Posts Tagged ‘video’

Techie Tip of the Week: HTML5 video

Friday, March 9th, 2012

Prior to the HTML5 specification, there didn’t exist any standard way of displaying video content on web sites. Some video tools used the EMBED tag; others used OBJECT — and all required the visitor to download and install a plugin (like QuickTime or RealPlayer).

With the advent of HTML5, there is a new standard way: the VIDEO tag. Support for the VIDEO element is still evolving, so it doesn’t work yet on all browsers.

VIDEO ELEMENT SUPPORT

  • IE: 9.0+
  • FIREFOX: 3.5+
  • SAFARI: 3.0+
  • CHROME: 3.0+
  • OPERA: 10.5+
  • IPHONE: 1.0+
  • ANDROID: 2.0+

To further complicate matters, no one codec is supported across browsers. Some support mp4, others webm, others ogg. Here’s the current lay of the land:

VIDEO CODEC SUPPORT

  • IE: WebM and MP4
  • FIREFOX: OGG and WebM
  • SAFARI: MP4 (and other formats if their QuickTime plugins are also installed)
  • CHROME: OGG and WebM
  • OPERA: OGG and WebM
  • IPHONE: MP4
  • ANDROID: MP4 and WebM

For maximum compatibility, the video workflow wil be:

  1. Make one version that uses WebM (VP8 + Vorbis).
  2. Make another version that uses H.264 baseline video and AAC “low complexity” audio in an MP4 container.
  3. Make another version that uses Theora video and Vorbis audio in an Ogg container
  4. Link to all three video files from a single VIDEO element, and fall back to a Flash-based video player

The final markup uses a VIDEO element for HTML5 video, a nested OBJECT element for Flash fallback, and a small bit of script for the benefit of Android devices:

20120310-131246.jpg

For more information, visit http://diveintohtml5.info/video.html, from which parts of this posting were taken from (CC license agreement).

Techie Tip of the Week: Saving a PowerPoint Presentation as a Movie

Friday, November 11th, 2011

Macintosh users have been able to convert PowerPoint Presentations to a movie format for years. But until Office 2010, on the Windows side, if you wanted to convert a PowerPoint into a movie, you had to install 3rd party software like Captivate, Jing, or Camtasia. With the advent of PowerPoint 2010, however, Windows users can now save their PowerPoint files into the WMV movie format, which can be then uploaded to YouTube or other video hosting services.

To save your PowerPoint into a movie format:

  • PowerPoint 2010 (Windows) — WMV file format
    1. Create your PowerPoint Presentation.
    2. Click the File button, and then click Save & Send.
    3. In the File Types section, click Create a Video. Select the desired options, and then click Create Video.
    4. In the File name field, enter the name of the presentation/video.
    5. Click Save. Your presentation is now a WMV movie!
  • PowerPoint 2004/2008/2011 (Macintosh) — MOV file format
    1. Create your PowerPoint Presentation.
    2. On the File menu, click Make Movie.
    3. In the Save As box, enter the name of the presentation/video.
    4. Click Save. Your presentation is now a MOV movie!

Techie Tip of the Week – Convert video into different formats (for mobile, web, etc.)

Friday, June 17th, 2011

One of the biggest problems with video and the Web today is that each web browser supports different video formats. So if you create a video, and only upload one video type, chances are many people trying to watch your video will be unable to do so.

As of now, here are the browsers and their native support of video:

  • Mozilla Firefox: OGG, WebM, Flash
  • Opera: OGG, WebM, Flash
  • Chrome: OGG, WebM, Flash
  • Safari: MP4 (H.264), Flash
  • iPhone/iPad Safari: MP4 (H.264)
  • Android: MP4(H.264), Flash

So, to make sure you’ve covered all the bases, it would be best to make a copy of your video in the WebM format, one that uses the MP4/H.264 format, one that uses the OGG format, and another that uses the Flash format.

Fortunately, there are tools that can help easily convert your video into multiple formats.

Here are 3 of them:

  • Miro Video Converter – Free, open source tool for both Macintosh and Windows
  • Handbrake – Another free, open-source tool for both Macintosh and Windows
  • FireOGG – Free, open-source plug-in for the Firefox browser to create video in the OGG format

For more tips like this, come to our video class and our forthcoming HTML5 class!

Techie Tip of the Week — Captioning Videos

Friday, June 3rd, 2011

Last week we talked about editing videos in YouTube; this week, I want to talk briefly about captioning those videos you create.

Did you know you should always add captions to your videos?  Doing so is essential for complying with state and federal accessibility laws (to enable the deaf and hard-of-hearing to understand video content).

But adding captions offers other benefits as well:

  • Increased comprehension of the material presented, especially for non-native speakers.
  • Searching and indexing capabilities – think of the student who wants to review a video of a professor’s talk. Instead of having to listen through the entire presentation, that student could search for the desired term, and then jump straight to the appropriate timecode.

For more information on captioning, and its importance for Stanford University, visit Stanford Captioning.

For information on accessibility issues in general, visit the Stanford Online Accessibility Program.

One of the services on the Stanford Captioning web site is the Stanford Captioning System, an online tool you can use to have transcripts created for you (for a fee).

To add captions in YouTube:

  1. If you’re not already signed in, in your web browser, go to http://www.youtube.com/ and click Sign In.
  2. Go to http://www.youtube.com/my_videos
  3. Click Edit next to the desired video.
  4. Click Captions and Subtitles.
  5. If do not have an existing transcript, and you wish to use the YouTube Machine Transcription service, click Request Processing.
    If you do have an existing transcript (e.g., from the Stanford Captioning System), click Add New Captions or Transcript.
  6. Then, click Choose File, and locate and select the transcript.

To learn more about creating and editing video using YouTube, come take:

Creating and Basic Editing of Video for the Web

http://goo.gl/wPUGo

YouTube has become the second-most used search engine to find content on the Web.

In class, we will use YouTube’s new built-in editor, but the processes and concepts learned are transferable to all editing software programs.

In this hands-on, half-day class, you’ll learn:

  • the basics of creating a simple promotional video
  • how to shoot a short video clip
  • how to edit your video
  • how to upload to YouTube
  • how to create captions to comply with accessibility regulations
  • and how to publish your video on your web site.

ITS-2614
06/22/2011
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Techie Tip of the Week — Editing Video Online With YouTube

Friday, May 27th, 2011

Did you know that you can edit videos directly within YouTube?

With YouTube Editor, you can:

  • Combine videos
  • Add music using AudioSwap, YouTube’s free tool that allows you to easily add music to your videos
  • Trim clips
  • Insert transitions
  • Rotate clips
  • Stabilize clips

For more on YouTube’s editor, take a look at YouTube’s online help: http://bit.ly/j7Mgou


To learn more about creating and editing video using YouTube, come take:

Creating and Basic Editing of Video for the Web

http://goo.gl/wPUGo

YouTube has become the second-most used search engine to find content on the Web.

In class, we will use YouTube’s new built-in editor, but the processes and concepts learned are transferable to all editing software programs.

In this hands-on, half-day class, you’ll learn:

  • the basics of creating a simple promotional video
  • how to shoot a short video clip
  • how to edit your video
  • how to upload to YouTube
  • how to create captions to comply with accessibility regulations
  • and how to publish your video on your web site.

ITS-2614
06/22/2011
9:00 AM – 12:00 PM