Posts Tagged ‘word’

Techie Tip of the Week: Adding Dummy Text in Word

Friday, November 16th, 2012

Ever find yourself wanting to test out a new layout for a brochure, poster, or article but don’t want to use actual content? The typesetting industry has for centuries used latin text to do exactly this (generally starting with “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit”).

Microsoft Word makes it easy to add this dummy text, and the newer versions of Word give you greater choice in the type of fake content you can add.

Here’s how to add dummy text using MS Word:

All Macintosh versions of MS Word and all versions of Word from 2003 and earlier:

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences with the sentence “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, use this command:

=rand(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences of “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”, use the command =rand(1,5):

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – “Quick brown fox”

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences with the sentence “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, use this command:

=rand.old(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences of “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.”, use the command =rand.old(1,5):

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – Random text from the help sections

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences from the help section, use this command:

=rand(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 1 paragraph with 5 sentences from the help section, use the command =rand(1,5):

On the Insert tab, the galleries include items that are designed to coordinate with the overall look of your document. You can use these galleries to insert tables, headers, footers, lists, cover pages, and other document building blocks. When you create pictures, charts, or diagrams, they also coordinate with your current document look.

 


 

Word 2007 and 2010 – Lorem Ipsum

To generate a number of paragraphs and sentences using the classic Lorem Ipsum text, use this command:

=lorem(number of paragraphs, number of sentences)

For example, to generate 3 paragraphs with 2 sentences of Lorem Ipsum, use the command =lorem(3,2):

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Maecenas porttitor congue massa.

Fusce posuere, magna sed pulvinar ultricies, purus lectus malesuada libero, sit amet commodo magna eros quis urna. Nunc viverra imperdiet enim.

Fusce est. Vivamus a tellus.

 

Techie Tip of the Week: Use Word’s Mail Merge to Send Email to Multiple Recipients

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Did you know that you can easily create and send personalized email newsletters and messages to multiple recipients using Microsoft Word (coupled with Excel)?  Although the bulk of the content of the email will be the same, you can customize or personalize parts of the email.

Each message will be a unique email, and you can personalize each one — for example, by addressing each recipient by name. The names and email addresses would come from a data source, like an Excel spreadsheet. Since each email is a separate message, you can use the To: field instead of the Bcc: field! This can make it less likely that your recipient’s email servers will treat the email as spam.

For detailed step-by-step instructions:

 

 

Mac Users: MS Office Interactive Command Reference Guides – 2008 to the new interface!

Friday, December 2nd, 2011

A few weeks ago we spotlighted the Interactive Command Reference Guides for Windows users. Mac users, have no fear! Here are the links to the Interactive Command Reference Guides for you!

Finally making the leap from Office 2004 or 2008 to 2011? Wondering where your favorite commands are located in the new interface? Or just want to explore the new interface with a little guidance?

Use AutoCorrect in MS Office to Save Typing Time!

Friday, October 21st, 2011

Here’s a great time-saving technique in Microsoft Office — use AutoCorrect to automatically enter text that you often use. Most people realize that AutoCorrect automatically corrects misspelled words — for example, the misspelled word abbout is automatically corrected to about.

But did you know that you can create your own set of keyboard shortcuts to automatically write phrases or words you often use? For example, if you often type Stanford University in a document, you can set the letters su to automatically be replaced with the phrase Stanford University.

Here’s how to add phrases and words in the AutoCorrect options:

Office 2003/2004/2008/2011

  1. On the Tools menu, click AutoCorrect.
  2. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  3. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  4. Click Add, and then click OK.

Office 2007/2010

  1. Click the Office Button (2007) or the File button (2010).
  2. Click Options.
  3. Click Proofing.
  4. Click AutoCorrect Options.
  5. In the Replace text as you type section, in the Replace field, enter the shortcut text (e.g., su).
  6. In the With field, enter the text you wish it to be replaced by (e.g., Stanford University).
  7. Click Add, and then click OK.

MS Office Interactive Command Reference Guides – 2003 to the new interface!

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

Finally making the leap from Office 2003 to 2007 or 2010? Wondering where your favorite 2003 commands are located in the new interface? Or just want to explore the new interface with a little guidance?

Microsoft has put together a handful of interactive web applications that will help ease the transition. Check them out!

Techie Tip of the Week: Inserting Images in Microsoft Office – Layout Status

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Original blog posting: http://bit.ly/q0Fx3v

Have you ever noticed that when you insert a photo or other image in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) that it sometimes “floats” around the document, but sometimes it stays inline with the rest of the document?

That’s because in MS Office, there are 5 layout statuses you can use when inserting an image, some that keep the image inline with the rest of the document, and others that allow the image to float.

Here’s how to change the Layout status of an image:

  1. Insert the image.
  2. Right-click the image and select Format Picture.
  3. Click Layout, and then click the desired Wrapping Style:

    1. In line with text – puts the image in the same line as the text (as if it were another character in the document)
    2. Square – floats the image, and places the surrounding text in a square shape around the image
    3. Tight – floats the image and puts the surrounding text as close as possible to the image
    4. Behind text – floats the image behind the text (as in a watermark)
    5. In front of text – floats the image on top of the text (without moving the text around it)
  4. Then, click OK.

Here are examples of the 5 wrapping styles:

  1. In line with text:
  2. Square:
  3. Tight:
  4. Behind text:
  5. In front of text:

IT Services Tip of the Week: Use Styles instead of Direct Formatting

Friday, August 5th, 2011

When creating or updating content using Microsoft Office products (e.g., Microsoft Word), you have two main options for formatting the document to change how it looks:

  • direct formatting (using the formatting toolbars)
  • styles

Direct Formatting

Direct formatting involves selecting the text, and then using the various drop- down menus and icons to select the formatting.

For example, to format a heading, you might select the text that will become the heading, click the B button to make it bold, change the font, and then change the size.

Direct formatting is a reasonable choice for a relatively small document, but for most documents, direct formatting can cause problems:

  • it’s easy to make mistakes (if you have multiple headings, you’ll need to make sure that each heading looks exactly the same, and apply exactly the same formatting choices)
  • it’s difficult to modify (if you decide later that you want a different style for the headings, you’ll need to modify each and every heading with the new style)

Styles

While most people tend to use direct formatting, a better choice is to use styles. Styles are:

  • a combination of formatting properties (e.g., font, font size, and paragraph indentation) that are named and saved as a set. When styles are applied to selected text, all the formatting properties in that style are applied.
  • semi-permanent repositories of formatting information. Once you create a style, you can reuse that same style in future documents.
  • easily modified. If you change your mind about how a particular style should look, modify the style, and all content attached to that style is likewise affected.

If you format your document using styles instead of direct formatting, you will be able to quickly and easily apply formatting choices consistently throughout the document.

To create or modify styles in MS Office 2003/2004/2008:

  1. On the Format menu, click Styles and Formatting (2003) or Style (2004/2008).
  2. Click New to create a new style.
    Or, to modify an existing style, select it and click Modify.
  3. Define your style by selecting the font choices and the paragraph settings. Click OK.
  4. Then, in the Style window, click Apply.
  5. To use your style, select the text. Then, on the Styles toolbar, click the desired style.

To create or modify styles in MS Office 2007/2010/2011:

  1. To create a new style, in the Styles group, click the Styles Pane icon, and then the New Style icon.
    Or, to modify an existing style, right-click the style and click Modify.
  2. Define your style by selecting the font choices and the paragraph settings. Then, click OK.
  3. To use your style, select the text. Then, in the Styles group, click the desired style.

Techie Tip of the Week: Adding Special Characters in MS Office (Accents, Umlauts, Tildes, etc.)

Friday, April 1st, 2011

If you write letters, create presentations, or other documents in languages other than English, you will often need to add special characters not found in the English character set (é, ü ñ, ¿, etc.)

To add these characters in Microsoft Office:

  • à è ì ò ù – À È Ì Ò Ù
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the ` key, and then press the desired letter.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the ` key, and then press the desired letter.
  • á é í ó ú ý – Á É Í Ó Ú Ý
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the ‘ key, and then press the desired letter.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the e key, and then press the desired letter.
  • â ê î ô û – Â Ê Î Ô Û
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the ^ key, and then press the desired letter.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the i key, and then press the desired letter.
  • ã ñ õ – Ã Ñ Õ
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the ~ key, and then press the desired letter.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the n key, and then press the desired letter.
  • ä ë ï ö ü ÿ – Ä Ë Ï Ö Ü Ÿ
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the : key, and then press the desired letter.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the u key, and then press the desired letter.
  • å Å
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the @ key, and then press the letter a or A.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter a or A.
  • æ
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press & and then press the letter a.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key.  Then press the ‘ key.
  • œ
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the & key, and then press the letter o.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter q.
  • ç Ç
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press  the + key, and then press the letter c or C.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter c or C.
  • ð
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the ‘ key, and then press the letter d.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter d.
  • ø Ø
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the + key.  Then press the / key, and then press the letter o or O.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter o or O.
  • ¿
    • Windows: Hold down the Alt key. Then hold down the Control key, and then press the ? key.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the Shift key, and then press the ? key.
  • ¡
    • Windows: Hold down the Alt key. Then hold down the Control key, and then press the ! key.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the 1 key.
  • ß
    • Windows: Hold down the Control key. Then press the & key, and then press the letter s.
    • Mac: Hold down the Option key. Then press the letter s.