Approved Courses

From Undergraduate Engineering Handbook

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
 
(27 intermediate revisions not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
-
<br>
+
== 2014-15 Approved School of Engineering Breadth Courses<br> ==
-
{| width="800" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="1" border="1" class="red-header"
 
-
|+
 
-
=== 2013-14 Approved School of Engineering Breadth Courses  ===
 
-
'''Find below links to SoE-approved courses to use for Math, Science, Technology in Society, and Engineering Fundamentals requirements for School of Engineering majors.'''
 
-
[http://www.stanford.edu/group/ughb/2011-14/SoE%20Approved%20Math_Statistics%20Courses%202013-14.pdf '''Math Courses 2013-14''']  
+
{| width="800" cellspacing="1" cellpadding="1" border="1" class="red-header"
-
 
+
|+ <br> '''Find below links to SoE-approved courses to fulfill 2014-15 Math, Science, Technology in Society, and Engineering Fundamentals requirements for School of Engineering majors.''' <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">''See text below the chart for more information on which math and/or science courses to take and when.''</span><br> [http://web.stanford.edu/group/ughb/cgi-bin/handbook/index.php/Math_Courses_2014-15 '''Math Courses 2014-15'''] New Course: CME 103/EE 103 Introduction to Matrix Methods, 5 units, A Note: For students who elect to take the MATH 50 series but would like to gain experience in MATLAB, MATH 51M is offered autumn quarter for 1 unit, and can be taken simultaneously with MATH 51. OR take 4-week course CME 192 A, W, or S quarters. [[Science Courses 2014-15|'''Science Courses 2014-15''']]<span style="color: rgb(153, 0, 0);">&nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);">
-
Note: For students who elect to take the MATH 50 series but would like to gain experience in MATLAB, MATH 51M is offered autumn quarter for 1 unit, and can be taken simultaneously with MATH 51.  
+
</span><span style="color: rgb(153, 0, 0);">  
-
 
+
</span> </span><br> [[Engineering Fundamentals Approved Courses|'''Engineering Fundamentals Courses 2014-15''']] <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">The newest version of ENGR 40 (ENGR 40M) will be offered twice in 2014-15, Aut &amp; Spr; enrollment no longer capped.</span> <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">3-5 units</span>. See ExploreCourses for more detail. <br> <u><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 128);">'''Course Chart for the 2014-15 TiS Requirement'''</span></u> <u>Note: CE and MS&amp;E majors must choose from among the courses marked “X” in the major columns. Students in other majors may choose from any of the following courses, although only BMC majors may use HUMBIO 174, BIOE 131 is limited to 20 students (preference to BioE majors), &amp; only CS majors may take CS 181W. <br></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u> <u></u>  
-
[http://www.stanford.edu/group/ughb/2011-14/SoE%20Approved%20Science%20Courses%202013-14.pdf '''Science Courses 2013-14''']<span style="color: rgb(153, 0, 0);">  
+
==== <u><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">2014-15 Technology in Society</span></u><u></u><br>  ====
-
</span>
+
-
 
+
-
'''Technology in Society Courses <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">Now updated for 2013-14</span> (see below) Note: '''<span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);">'''TiS Course COMM 169 Computers &amp; Interfaces is cancelled Winter quarter '''due to the sudden passing of Professor Nass.</span><span style="color: rgb(153, 0, 0);">  
+
-
</span>  
+
-
 
+
-
[http://www.stanford.edu/group/ughb/2011-14/SoE%20Approved%20ENGR%20Fundamentals%20Courses%202013-14.pdf '''Engineering Fundamentals Courses 2013-14''']  
+
-
 
+
-
<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">The abbreviated version of ENGR 40 will continue to be offered 2013-14: </span>'''<span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">ENGR 40A</span>''', <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">3 units, 7 weeks of instruction</span>. See ExploreCourses for more detail. Allowed for EE, MATSCI, MGTSC, CS, and most subplan majors (though students may need to make up the extra 2 units by taking another ENGR Fundamentals or depth course). Not allowed for ME or EPhys majors, who must take E 40, or CEE students (due to ABET rules).
+
-
 
+
-
=== <br> Course Chart for the 2013-14 TiS Requirement ===
+
-
 
+
-
Note: CE, EnvE, and MS&amp;E majors must choose from among the courses marked “X” in the major columns. Students in other majors may choose from any of the following courses, although only BMC majors may use HUMBIO 174, BIOE 131 is limited to 20 students (preference to BioE majors), &amp; only CS majors may take CS 181W. '''<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">PD Majors: See your [http://www.stanford.edu/group/ughb/cgi-bin/handbook/index.php/Product_Design_Program Major page] for updates on using ME 120.</span>'''<br><br>  
+
-
 
+
-
==== <span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 255);">2013-2014 Technology in Society</span><br>  ====
+
Line 33: Line 15:
| '''Title'''  
| '''Title'''  
| '''Qtr'''<br>  
| '''Qtr'''<br>  
-
| '''CEE'''<br>  
+
| '''CE'''<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; *<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; *<br>  
| '''MS&amp;E'''<br>
| '''MS&amp;E'''<br>
-
|-
 
-
| ENGR 130<br>
 
-
| Science Technology, and Contemporary, 4-5 units- <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">Not Offered 2013-14</span><br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; -<br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 
-
| &nbsp; <br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 
-
|-
 
-
| ENGR 131<br>
 
-
| Ethical Issues in Engineering, 4 units<br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; -<br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 
-
| &nbsp; <br>
 
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 
-
|-
 
-
| ENGR 145<br>
 
-
| Technology Entrepreneurship, 4 units<br>
 
-
| &nbsp; A,W<br>
 
-
| <br>
 
-
| <br>
 
|-
|-
| BIOE 131 (WIM)<br>  
| BIOE 131 (WIM)<br>  
Line 64: Line 26:
| <br>
| <br>
|-
|-
-
| CLASSART 113
+
| CLASSICS 151<br>
-
| Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design (must take for at least 4 units)
+
| Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design, 3 units<br>
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; W
+
| &nbsp;&nbsp; A<br>
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
Line 72: Line 34:
|-
|-
| COMM 120W (WIM)<br>  
| COMM 120W (WIM)<br>  
-
| Digital Media in Society, 5 units<br>  
+
| Digital Media in Society, 5 units <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">Not Offered 2014-15</span><br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; A<br>  
+
| <br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>  
+
| <br>  
| <br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
+
| <br>
 +
| <br>
|-
|-
-
| <span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);">COMM 169 </span><br>
+
| COMM 169  
-
| <span style="color: rgb(128, 0, 128);"> Computers and Interfaces CANCELLED due to sudden passing of Prof Nass
+
| Computers and Interfaces, 4-5 units<br>  
-
 
+
| A
-
</span>
+
| &nbsp; X  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; W<br>
+
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
+
| <br>  
| <br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
+
| &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; X
|-
|-
-
| CS 181 (Prereq CS 106B<br>  
+
| CS 181 (Prereq CS 106B or X)<br>  
| Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (Prereq: CS 106B or X), 4 units<br>  
| Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (Prereq: CS 106B or X), 4 units<br>  
-
| &nbsp; A,S<br>  
+
| A,W,S<br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>  
+
| <br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; <br>  
+
| <br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
+
| <br>
|-
|-
| CS 181W (WIM)<br>  
| CS 181W (WIM)<br>  
| Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (for CS majors only), 4 units<br>  
| Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (for CS majors only), 4 units<br>  
-
| &nbsp; A,S<br>  
+
| A,W,S<br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
|-
 +
| ECON 116<br>
 +
| American Economic History, 5 units (prereq of ECON 1 or 1A)<br>
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
|-
 +
| ENGR 129 (online)
 +
| The Internet in Global Context (for BOSP abroad students only), 4 units
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; S
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
|-
 +
| ENGR 130<br>
 +
| Science Technology, and Contemporary, 4-5 units-&nbsp;&nbsp; <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">Not Offered 2014-15</span><br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; -<br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 +
| &nbsp; <br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 +
|-
 +
| ENGR 131<br>
 +
| Ethical Issues in Engineering, 4 units<br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; -<br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 +
| &nbsp; <br>
 +
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
 +
|-
 +
| ENGR 145<br>
 +
| Technology Entrepreneurship, 4 units<br>
 +
| &nbsp; A,W<br>
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>
| <br>
|-
|-
| HUMBIO 174<br>  
| HUMBIO 174<br>  
-
| Foundations of Bioethics (BMC Majors), 3 units<br>  
+
| Foundations of Bioethics (BMC Majors; prereq of HUMBIO core), 3 units<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; S<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; S<br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
Line 108: Line 102:
| <br>
| <br>
|-
|-
-
| <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">-- ME 120 --</span><br>
+
| <br>
-
| &nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);"> -- no longer a TiS course (PD majors refer to your [http://www.stanford.edu/group/ughb/cgi-bin/handbook/index.php/Product_Design_Program Major page] for further instruction) --</span><br>  
+
| &nbsp;<span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);"> -- ME 120 -- is </span><span style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51);">no longer a TiS course (PD majors may take any other approved course listed)</span><br>  
| &nbsp; <br>  
| &nbsp; <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
Line 118: Line 112:
| Issues in Tech &amp; Work for Post-Industrial Economy, 3 units<br>  
| Issues in Tech &amp; Work for Post-Industrial Economy, 3 units<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; S<br>  
| &nbsp;&nbsp; S<br>  
-
| &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>  
+
| &nbsp;&nbsp; <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
| &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
| &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp; X<br>
Line 131: Line 125:
| MS&amp;E 197<br>  
| MS&amp;E 197<br>  
| Ethics and Public Policy, 5 units<br>  
| Ethics and Public Policy, 5 units<br>  
-
| <br>  
+
| &nbsp; W<br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>  
Line 151: Line 145:
|-
|-
| PUBLPOL 194  
| PUBLPOL 194  
-
| Technology Policy, 5 units  
+
| Technology Policy, 4 units  
| &nbsp; W  
| &nbsp; W  
| &nbsp; X  
| &nbsp; X  
 +
| <br>
 +
| <br>
 +
|-
 +
| STS 1<br>
 +
| The Public Life of Science and Technology, 5 units<br>
 +
| &nbsp; W<br>
 +
| <br>
| <br>  
| <br>  
| <br>
| <br>
Line 161: Line 162:
ME 120 is no longer a TiS course for any SoE major program.  
ME 120 is no longer a TiS course for any SoE major program.  
 +
 +
=== <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">MATHEMATICS COURSES</span> ===
 +
 +
<br> As a general rule, students interested in an engineering major should take a sequence of mathematics courses in their first year. Choosing which sequence to take, however, requires careful thought and the assistance of your advisor. Stanford offers several different entry points and options:
 +
 +
<br> • MATH 41 and 42 present single variable calculus, with an emphasis on differential calculus in the first quarter and integral calculus in the second.<br>• MATH 19, 20, and 21 cover the same material as MATH 41 and 42, but do so in three quarters instead of two.<br>• CME 100, 102, and 104 or 106 (same as ENGR 154, 155A, 155B, and 155C) are taken by students who enter Stanford with 10 units of AP credit, or who have completed either MATH 42 or MATH 21. The CME courses were developed for undergraduates interested in engineering, and are recommended by almost all engineering departments. CME 100 presents multivariable calculus with engineering applications, and introduces MATLAB, which is incorporated throughout the CME series and will be useful in many later engineering and science courses. CME 102 covers ordinary differential equations, CME 104 covers linear algebra and partial differential equations, and CME 106 covers probability and statistics for engineering – all with an emphasis on engineering examples and topics. CME 102 may be taken before or after CME 100, while CME 106 requires either CME 100 or Math 51 as a prerequisite. CME 104 requires CME 102 as a prerequisite. <br>• MATH 51, 52, and 53* may be taken by students who enter Stanford with 10 units of AP credit, or who have completed either MATH 42 or MATH 21. The 50 series covers similar material, but in a different order than in the CME series and without a focus on engineering examples and topics. These courses are taught in an integrated fashion, with differential calculus of several variables and linear algebra being taught in MATH 51, integral calculus with linear algebra in MATH 52, and differential equations, including matrix methods for solving systems, in MATH 53. Math 51 and 52 can be replaced by CME100, although students who take both MATH 51 and CME 100 will receive only 7-8 units of credit due to duplication of material. Students who are unsure of their mathematics preparation should consult with an advisor in the mathematics department or with the Office of Student Affairs in 135 Huang to determine math placement and what requirements can be waived.<br>* Note: These courses do not include MATLAB. To get MATLAB experience with the MATH 50 series take 1-unit courses MATH 51M (autumn quarter only) or CME 192 (4-week course offered A, W, S).<br>
 +
 +
<br>
 +
 +
=== <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">PHYSICS COURSES</span> ===
 +
 +
<br> The decision of whether to take a physics course in your first year is not nearly as simple as your decision about mathematics. Given the fact that you will also be taking required courses in writing and the humanities, taking both mathematics and physics in your first year pretty much fills your schedule, leaving little room for seminars or other courses that may spark new interests. Furthermore, although all engineering majors require physics, it is often unnecessary to take physics so early in your undergraduate program. For students interested in engineering majors that depend heavily on physics, such as Engineering Physics, some aspects of Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering, taking physics in your first year makes a great deal of sense because physics is a prerequisite for many of the advanced courses. For most other engineering majors, however, it probably makes sense to delay physics until your sophomore year, giving you more flexibility in your course schedule.
 +
 +
<br> As with mathematics, there are several possible sequences that are appropriate for first-year students:
 +
 +
• PHYSICS 41, 43, and 45 constitute the standard introductory sequence in physics and cover mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and light and heat, respectively. These courses are calculus-based and are generally far more intensive than typical high-school offerings, even at the advanced placement level. Even students who have taken AP Physics—and therefore do not in fact need the credits for these courses—find them challenging. Because the Stanford courses cover so much more material and do so with greater depth and rigor, it often makes sense to give up the Advanced Placement credits and take these courses. Talk with your advisor for guidance in this area. Note that PHYSICS 41 has prerequisites of high school physics or PHYSICS 19, and MATH 41 or 20 or 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Minimum corequisite: MATH 42 or 21 or 51 or CME 100. See Figure 3-2, Courses Approved for the Science Requirement, in Chapter 3 for detail on all the physics courses.<br>• PHYSICS 61, 63, and 65 offer a more advanced sequence designed for students who have mastered physics and calculus at the level of AP Physics C and AP Calculus B/C in high school. This series is a good choice for prospective Engineering Physics or Physics majors and those interested in a more rigorous introduction to the field.<br>• PHYSICS 21, 23, and 25 provide a lower-level introduction to basic physics primarily intended for premedical students. Most departments in the School of Engineering do not accept these courses and require students to take the 40 series or a more advanced offering. However, if you are intending to major in a discipline that allows students to take these courses, such as Computer Science or many of the degree options in Management Science and Engineering, these courses may represent an attractive option.<br>
 +
 +
<br>
 +
 +
=== <span style="color: rgb(255, 0, 255);">CHEMISTRY COURSES</span> ===
 +
 +
<br> For some engineering majors, such as Chemical Engineering and the School of Engineering majors associated with biology or medicine, taking a chemistry course in your first year is far more important than taking physics, largely because Stanford requires students to take a year of introductory chemistry before enrolling in biology. In order to get any advanced biology courses into a four-year degree, it is critical to begin the chemistry sequence early.
 +
 +
<br> The two-quarter sequence Chemistry 31A and 31B is offered in the autumn and winter quarters respectively, and the one-quarter accelerated course, Chemistry 31X, is offered in the autumn quarter only. Additionally, students with a score of 5 on the Chemistry Advanced Placement Exam may continue to start in Chemistry 33, which is offered winter and spring quarters, but see the last paragraph in this section, below, about consequences for those preparing to apply to medical school.
 +
 +
Chemistry 31A and Chemistry 31B cover all the essential topics in general chemistry that are required to prepare students for the subsequent courses in the curriculum. Only the more advanced portions of these same topics are covered in Chemistry 31X. Both tracks use the same textbook and will arrive at the same endpoint. Thus, Chemistry 31X is an accelerated course for students with a strong background in high school chemistry. Chemistry 31A and 31B is for students with moderate or no background in high school chemistry. Chemistry 31A is a prerequisite for taking Chemistry 31B. Students must decide before autumn quarter whether or not they will take the two-quarter track because it will not be offered again until the following year. <br>
 +
 +
<br>
=== ABET Unit Count for Use in Program Sheets from 2010-11 and Before (CHE, CE, EE, ENV, ME only)  ===
=== ABET Unit Count for Use in Program Sheets from 2010-11 and Before (CHE, CE, EE, ENV, ME only)  ===
Line 377: Line 406:
|}
|}
-
<u>Unit Allocation Lists for Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering</u> can be found in the 2010-11 UGHB, Chapter 5, the major programs section; see Handbooks page.<br>
+
&lt;u&gt;Unit Allocation Lists for Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering&lt;/u&gt; can be found in the 2010-11 UGHB, Chapter 5, the major programs section; see Handbooks page.<br>

Latest revision as of 14:48, 30 June 2015

Contents

2014-15 Approved School of Engineering Breadth Courses


Find below links to SoE-approved courses to fulfill 2014-15 Math, Science, Technology in Society, and Engineering Fundamentals requirements for School of Engineering majors. See text below the chart for more information on which math and/or science courses to take and when.
Math Courses 2014-15 New Course: CME 103/EE 103 Introduction to Matrix Methods, 5 units, A Note: For students who elect to take the MATH 50 series but would like to gain experience in MATLAB, MATH 51M is offered autumn quarter for 1 unit, and can be taken simultaneously with MATH 51. OR take 4-week course CME 192 A, W, or S quarters. Science Courses 2014-15 
Engineering Fundamentals Courses 2014-15 The newest version of ENGR 40 (ENGR 40M) will be offered twice in 2014-15, Aut & Spr; enrollment no longer capped. 3-5 units. See ExploreCourses for more detail.
Course Chart for the 2014-15 TiS Requirement Note: CE and MS&E majors must choose from among the courses marked “X” in the major columns. Students in other majors may choose from any of the following courses, although only BMC majors may use HUMBIO 174, BIOE 131 is limited to 20 students (preference to BioE majors), & only CS majors may take CS 181W.

2014-15 Technology in Society

Course
Title Qtr
CE
   *
MS&E
BIOE 131 (WIM)
Ethics in Bioengineering (Preference to BioE Majors), 3 units
   S



CLASSICS 151
Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design, 3 units
   A



COMM 120W (WIM)
Digital Media in Society, 5 units Not Offered 2014-15




COMM 169 Computers and Interfaces, 4-5 units
A   X
    X
CS 181 (Prereq CS 106B or X)
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (Prereq: CS 106B or X), 4 units
A,W,S



CS 181W (WIM)
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy (for CS majors only), 4 units
A,W,S



ECON 116
American Economic History, 5 units (prereq of ECON 1 or 1A)




ENGR 129 (online) The Internet in Global Context (for BOSP abroad students only), 4 units    S


ENGR 130
Science Technology, and Contemporary, 4-5 units-   Not Offered 2014-15
   -
   X
 
   X
ENGR 131
Ethical Issues in Engineering, 4 units
   -
   X
 
   X
ENGR 145
Technology Entrepreneurship, 4 units
  A,W


HUMBIO 174
Foundations of Bioethics (BMC Majors; prereq of HUMBIO core), 3 units
   S




  -- ME 120 -- is no longer a TiS course (PD majors may take any other approved course listed)
 

 

MS&E 181
Issues in Tech & Work for Post-Industrial Economy, 3 units
   S
  

     X
MS&E 193/193W Technology and National Security, 3 units    A

     X
MS&E 197
Ethics and Public Policy, 5 units
  W


     X
POLISCI 114S International Security in a Changing World, 5 units   W
  

PUBLPOL 122 Biosecurity & Bioterrorism Response (must take for 4 units & have research topic approved in advance by Prof McGinn. Email him at <mcginn@stanford.edu> ) 4 units   S


PUBLPOL 194 Technology Policy, 4 units   W   X

STS 1
The Public Life of Science and Technology, 5 units
  W



  • ME students may now take any approved course on this list to satisfy the TiS requirement.

ME 120 is no longer a TiS course for any SoE major program.

MATHEMATICS COURSES


As a general rule, students interested in an engineering major should take a sequence of mathematics courses in their first year. Choosing which sequence to take, however, requires careful thought and the assistance of your advisor. Stanford offers several different entry points and options:


• MATH 41 and 42 present single variable calculus, with an emphasis on differential calculus in the first quarter and integral calculus in the second.
• MATH 19, 20, and 21 cover the same material as MATH 41 and 42, but do so in three quarters instead of two.
• CME 100, 102, and 104 or 106 (same as ENGR 154, 155A, 155B, and 155C) are taken by students who enter Stanford with 10 units of AP credit, or who have completed either MATH 42 or MATH 21. The CME courses were developed for undergraduates interested in engineering, and are recommended by almost all engineering departments. CME 100 presents multivariable calculus with engineering applications, and introduces MATLAB, which is incorporated throughout the CME series and will be useful in many later engineering and science courses. CME 102 covers ordinary differential equations, CME 104 covers linear algebra and partial differential equations, and CME 106 covers probability and statistics for engineering – all with an emphasis on engineering examples and topics. CME 102 may be taken before or after CME 100, while CME 106 requires either CME 100 or Math 51 as a prerequisite. CME 104 requires CME 102 as a prerequisite.
• MATH 51, 52, and 53* may be taken by students who enter Stanford with 10 units of AP credit, or who have completed either MATH 42 or MATH 21. The 50 series covers similar material, but in a different order than in the CME series and without a focus on engineering examples and topics. These courses are taught in an integrated fashion, with differential calculus of several variables and linear algebra being taught in MATH 51, integral calculus with linear algebra in MATH 52, and differential equations, including matrix methods for solving systems, in MATH 53. Math 51 and 52 can be replaced by CME100, although students who take both MATH 51 and CME 100 will receive only 7-8 units of credit due to duplication of material. Students who are unsure of their mathematics preparation should consult with an advisor in the mathematics department or with the Office of Student Affairs in 135 Huang to determine math placement and what requirements can be waived.
* Note: These courses do not include MATLAB. To get MATLAB experience with the MATH 50 series take 1-unit courses MATH 51M (autumn quarter only) or CME 192 (4-week course offered A, W, S).


PHYSICS COURSES


The decision of whether to take a physics course in your first year is not nearly as simple as your decision about mathematics. Given the fact that you will also be taking required courses in writing and the humanities, taking both mathematics and physics in your first year pretty much fills your schedule, leaving little room for seminars or other courses that may spark new interests. Furthermore, although all engineering majors require physics, it is often unnecessary to take physics so early in your undergraduate program. For students interested in engineering majors that depend heavily on physics, such as Engineering Physics, some aspects of Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering, taking physics in your first year makes a great deal of sense because physics is a prerequisite for many of the advanced courses. For most other engineering majors, however, it probably makes sense to delay physics until your sophomore year, giving you more flexibility in your course schedule.


As with mathematics, there are several possible sequences that are appropriate for first-year students:

• PHYSICS 41, 43, and 45 constitute the standard introductory sequence in physics and cover mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and light and heat, respectively. These courses are calculus-based and are generally far more intensive than typical high-school offerings, even at the advanced placement level. Even students who have taken AP Physics—and therefore do not in fact need the credits for these courses—find them challenging. Because the Stanford courses cover so much more material and do so with greater depth and rigor, it often makes sense to give up the Advanced Placement credits and take these courses. Talk with your advisor for guidance in this area. Note that PHYSICS 41 has prerequisites of high school physics or PHYSICS 19, and MATH 41 or 20 or 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Minimum corequisite: MATH 42 or 21 or 51 or CME 100. See Figure 3-2, Courses Approved for the Science Requirement, in Chapter 3 for detail on all the physics courses.
• PHYSICS 61, 63, and 65 offer a more advanced sequence designed for students who have mastered physics and calculus at the level of AP Physics C and AP Calculus B/C in high school. This series is a good choice for prospective Engineering Physics or Physics majors and those interested in a more rigorous introduction to the field.
• PHYSICS 21, 23, and 25 provide a lower-level introduction to basic physics primarily intended for premedical students. Most departments in the School of Engineering do not accept these courses and require students to take the 40 series or a more advanced offering. However, if you are intending to major in a discipline that allows students to take these courses, such as Computer Science or many of the degree options in Management Science and Engineering, these courses may represent an attractive option.


CHEMISTRY COURSES


For some engineering majors, such as Chemical Engineering and the School of Engineering majors associated with biology or medicine, taking a chemistry course in your first year is far more important than taking physics, largely because Stanford requires students to take a year of introductory chemistry before enrolling in biology. In order to get any advanced biology courses into a four-year degree, it is critical to begin the chemistry sequence early.


The two-quarter sequence Chemistry 31A and 31B is offered in the autumn and winter quarters respectively, and the one-quarter accelerated course, Chemistry 31X, is offered in the autumn quarter only. Additionally, students with a score of 5 on the Chemistry Advanced Placement Exam may continue to start in Chemistry 33, which is offered winter and spring quarters, but see the last paragraph in this section, below, about consequences for those preparing to apply to medical school.

Chemistry 31A and Chemistry 31B cover all the essential topics in general chemistry that are required to prepare students for the subsequent courses in the curriculum. Only the more advanced portions of these same topics are covered in Chemistry 31X. Both tracks use the same textbook and will arrive at the same endpoint. Thus, Chemistry 31X is an accelerated course for students with a strong background in high school chemistry. Chemistry 31A and 31B is for students with moderate or no background in high school chemistry. Chemistry 31A is a prerequisite for taking Chemistry 31B. Students must decide before autumn quarter whether or not they will take the two-quarter track because it will not be offered again until the following year.


ABET Unit Count for Use in Program Sheets from 2010-11 and Before (CHE, CE, EE, ENV, ME only)

Find below Engineering Science, Design, and Experimentation unit allocation for ENGR courses. For ABET values of departmental courses for the accredited majors (Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering), see individual sections within Chapter 5 of the Handbook.


Course
Engineering Courses (ENGR)                      
SCI
DES
EXP
Total
ENGR 10
Introduction to Engineering Analysis (Sum)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 14/14S
Applied Mechanics: Statics (A,S/W)
2
1
-
3
ENGR 15
Dynamics (A,S)
2
1
-
3
ENGR 20
Intro to Chemical Engineering (same as CHEMENG 20) (S)
2
1
-
3
ENGR 25B
Biotechnology (same as CHEMENG 25B) (S)
2
1
-
3
ENGR 25E

Energy: Chemical Transformation for Production,

Storage, and Use (same as CHEMENG 25E) (W)

2
1
-
3
ENGR 30
Engineering Thermodynamics (A,W)
3
-
-
3
ENGR 40
Introductory Electronics (A,S)
3
2
2
5
ENGR 50
Intro to Materials Science, Nantechnology Emphasis (W,S)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 50E
Intro to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis (W)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 50M
Intro to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis (A)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 60
Engineering Economy (A,S)
3
-
-
3
ENGR 62
Intro to Optimization (same as MS&E 111) (A,S)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 70A
Programming Methodology (A,W,S,Sum)
3
2
-
5
ENGR 70B
Programming Abstractions (A,W,S,Sum)
3
2
-
5
ENGR 70X
Programming Abstractions, Accelerated (A)
3
2
-
5
ENGR 80
Intro to Bioengineering (S)
4
-
-
4
ENGR 102E
Tech/Professional Writing for Electrical Engineers
-
-
-
1
ENGR 102M
Tech/Profess Writing for Mechanical Engrs
-
-
-
1
ENGR 105
Feedback Control Design (W,Sum)
1
2
-
3
ENGR 120
Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineer (A)
2
1
-
3
ENGR 205
Introduction to Control Design Techniques (A)
1
2
-
3
ENGR 206
Control System Design and Simulation (not given 2010-11)
-
3-4
-
3-4
ENGR 207A
Linear Control Systems I (not given 2010-11)
-
-
-
3
ENGR 207B
Linear Control Systems II (W)
1
2
2
3
ENGR 207C
Linear Control Systems III (A)
-
-
-
3
ENGR 209A
Analysis & Control of Nonlinear Systems (W)
-
3
-
3






<u>Unit Allocation Lists for Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering</u> can be found in the 2010-11 UGHB, Chapter 5, the major programs section; see Handbooks page.

Personal tools