STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING


QUEUEING & SCHEDULING IN PROCESSING NETWORKS

MS&E-335 / Autumn 2013

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ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION

 


COURSE DESCRIPTION

This is an advanced course on modeling, analysis and design of queueing systems and stochastic processing networks. Its purpose is to introduce Stanford graduate students to modern concepts, important models and key results used in the study of queueing systems, preparing them for further targeted study and research in engineering fields where "queueing phenomena" play an important role in system performance. Such is the case in congestion management, throughput or yield maximization, task scheduling and resource allocation in a variety of engineering systems, ranging from computer communication networks, distributed computing and the Internet ... to production systems, supply chains, service systems, business operations etc.

The course aims to develop the student's intuition and technical ability in modeling and analyzing complex queueing systems and networks.  Despite its seemingly high mathematical level, most emphasis is placed on identifying and explaining the deep concepts and intuition associated with the issues under consideration.

Solid understanding of probability and Markov chains will be useful background for this course.

The high-level structure of the course is following:

 


READING MATERIAL

 

 

 

GENERAL REFERENCES

  1. S. Asmussen.  Applied Probability and Queues, Wiley, 1987.
  2. F. Baccelli, P. Bremaud. Elements of Queueing Theory. Springer, 1991.
  3. A. Brandt, P. Franken, B. Lisek. Stationary Stochastic Models, Wiley. 1992.
  4. X. Chao, M. Miyazawa, M. Pinedo. Queueing Networks. Wiley, 1999.
  5. H. Chen, D. D. Yao. Fundamental of Queueing Networks, Springer, 2001.
  6. D. Gross, C. M. Harris. Fundamentals of Queueing Theory - 3rd edition. Wiley, 1998.
  7. F. Kelly. Reversibility and Stochastic Networks. Wiley. 1979.
  8. M. Y. Kitaev, V. V. Rykov. Controlled Queueing Systems. CRC Press, 1995.
  9. L. Kleinrock. Queueing Systems I & II, Wiley, 1975.
  10. R. Serfozo. Introduction to Stochastic Networks, Springer 1999.
  11. R. Wolff. Stochastic modeling and the theory of queues. Prentice-Hall, 1989.
  12. J. Walrand. Introduction to queueing networks. Prentice-Hall. 1989.