Beth Levin: Students

Beth Levin

Department of Linguistics
Stanford University



Current Ph.D. Students:

Primary Advisor:

None currently

Committee Member:

Alex Djalali

External Advisor:

Maryse Grône, Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7.



Past Ph.D. Students:

Primary Advisor:

Jason Grafmiller Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2013.
The Semantics of Syntactic Choice: An Analysis of English Emotion Verbs.
Current position: Research Associate, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Scott Grimm, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2012.
Number and Individuation.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY.

Melanie Owens, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2012.
Serial Verb Constructions: Argument Structural Uniformity and Event Structural Diversity.

Jingxia Lin, Ph.D., East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University, 2011.
The Encoding of Motion Events in Chinese: Multi-morpheme Motion Constructions. (Chao Fen Sun, co-chair)
Current position: Assistant Professor, Division of Chinese, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Iván García-Álvarez, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2009.
Generality and Exception: A Study in the Semantics of Exceptives. (David Beaver, co-chair)
Current position: Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, School of Languages, University of Salford, UK.

Itamar Francez, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2007.
Existential Propositions. (Cleo Condoravdi, co-chair)
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Chicago.

Andrew Koontz-Garboden, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2007.
States, Changes of State, and the Monotonicity Hypothesis.
Current position: Senior Lecturer in Linguistics, University of Manchester, UK.

John Beavers, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2006.
Argument/Oblique Alternations and the Structure of Lexical Meaning.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Texas, Austin, TX.

Jean-Philippe Marcotte, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2005.
Causative Alternation Errors in Child Language. (Eve Clark, co-chair)
Current position: Contract Assistant Professor, Institute of Linguistics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Saundra Wright, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 2001.
Internally Caused and Externally Caused Change of State Verbs. (Chris Kennedy, co-chair)
Current position: Associate Professor, Assistant Chair, and ESL Coordinator, Department of English, California State University, Chico, CA.

Michele Feist, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 2000.
On In and On: An Investigation into the Linguistic Encoding of Spatial Scenes. (Dedre Gentner, co-chair)
Current position: Associate Professor, Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Louisiana at Lafayette.

Larin Adams, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1999.
Complex Events and the Semantics of -ing Sentential Complements.
Current position: Instructor, Department of Linguistics, Payap University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; also SIL International, Dallas, TX.

Linda DiDesidero, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1999.
Psych Verbs: Acquisition, Lexical Semantics, and Event Structure.
Current position: Director, Communication Studies and Professional Writing, University of Maryland University College, Adelphi, MD.

Grace Song, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1997.
Cross-linguistic Differences in the Expression of Motion Events: Implications for Second Language Acquisition.
Current position: ESL Instructor, English Language Support Program, Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Victoria Muehleisen, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1997.
Antonymy and Semantic Range in English.
Current position: Associate Professor in English, International College, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan.

Talke Macfarland, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1995.
Cognate Objects and the Argument/Adjunct Distinction.
Current position: Adjunct Faculty, Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD.

Mari Olsen, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1994.
A Semantic and Pragmatic Model of Lexical and Grammatical Aspect. (Published by Garland, 1997.)
Current position: Senior Lead International Project Engineer, Microsoft, Redmond, WA.

Committee Member:

Matthew E. Adams, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2014.
The Comparative Grammaticality of the English Comparative.
Current position: DAAD Postdoctoral researcher, Heinrich-Heine Universität, Düsseldorf, Germany

Marie-Catherine de Marneffe, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2013.
What's That Supposed to Mean? Modeling the Pragmatic Meaning of Utterances.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

Nola Stephens, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2010.
Given-before-new: The Effects of Discourse on Argument Structure in Early Child Language.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of English, Covenant College, Lookout Mountain, GA.

Douglas Ball, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2009.
Clause Structure and Argument Realization in Tongan.
Current position: Temporary Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Truman State University, Kirksville, MO.

Elizabeth Coppock, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2009.
The Logical and Empirical Foundations of Baker's Paradox.
Current position: Researcher, Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Elisabeth Norcliffe, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2009.
Head Marking in Usage and Grammar: A Study of Variation and Change in Yucatec Maya.
Current position: Research Staff, Language and Cognition Group, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Tatiana Nikitina (more information), Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2008.
The Mixing of Syntactic Properties and Language Change.
Current position: Chargée de recherches 1ère classe, Laboratoire Langage, Langues et Cultures d'Afrique Noire, C.N.R.S., Paris, France.

Ashwini Deo, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2006.
Tense and Aspect in Indo-Aryan Languages: Variation and Diachrony.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of Linguistics, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Judith Tonhauser, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2006.
The Temporal Semantics of Noun Phrases: Evidence from Guaraní.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Linguistics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

Veronica Gerassimova, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2005.
Unbounded Dependency Constructions in Western Austronesian.
Current position: Senior Search Quality Analyst, Yahoo.

Shiao Wei Tham, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2004.
Representing Possessive Predication: Semantic Dimensions and Pragmatic Bases.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA.

David McKercher, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2001.
The Polysemy of with in First Language.
Current position: Continuing Sessional Instructor, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC.

Ida Toivonen, Ph.D., Linguistics, Stanford University, 2001.
The Phrase Structure of Non-Projecting Words.
Current position: Assistant Professor, Institute of Cognitive Science and School of Linguistics and Language Studies, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON.

Raquel Klibanoff, Ph.D., Psychology, Northwestern University, 2000.
Conceptual and Perceptual Factors Contributing to the Role of Basic Level Categories in Children's Acquisition of Adjectives.

Phillip Wolff, Ph.D., Psychology, Northwestern University, 1999.
Events Construals and the Linguistic Coding of Causal Chains.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Pilar Ron, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1998.
The Position of the Subject in Spanish and Clausal Structure: Evidence from Dialectal Variation.
Current position: Profesor Titular, Filología Inglesa, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva, Spain.

Betty Birner, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1992.
The Discourse Function of Inversion in English.
Current position: Professor, Department of English, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL.

C.-H. Chang, Ph.D., EECS, Northwestern University, 1991.
Resolving Ambiguities in Mandarin Chinese.

Franziska Lys, Ph.D., Linguistics, Northwestern University, 1988.
An Analysis of Aspectual Compositionality in English and German.
Current position: Associate Professor, Department of German, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

Judy Shepard-Kegl, Ph.D., Linguistics, MIT, 1985.
Locative Relations in American Sign Language: Word Formation, Syntax and Discourse.
Current position: Professor, Department of Linguistics, University of Southern Maine, Portland, ME.


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