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About me...


I am a Ph.D. student in the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford University, where I work with Prof. Christos Kozyrakis. I am mainly interested in computer architecture and computer systems. Specifically, I work on QoS-aware scheduling and resource management techniques for large-scale datacenters. I believe that efficient, QoS-aware computer systems that operate in a predictable fashion should have a strong theoretical background. In the past I have also worked on modeling of datacenter workloads. I am a member of the MAST group, and I am also part of the SEDCL project.

I have previously earned an M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University (December 2011). In 2009 I graduated from the National Technical University of Athens with a diploma in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

I am currently supported by a Facebook Research Fellowship (2014-2015). Previously I was supported by the N. Arvanitidis Stanford Graduate Fellowship (2009-2013). I have also earned scholarships from the National Technical University of Athens (2005-2008), the State Scholarship Foundation (2007-2009), and the Greek National Scholarship Foundation (2005-2008).

Here is my CV.





The Satrapy

What a misfortune, although you are made
for fine and great works
this unjust fate of yours always
denies you encouragement and success;
that base customs should block you;
and pettiness and indifference.
And how terrible the day when you yield
(the day when you give up and yield),
and you leave on foot for Susa,
and you go to the monarch Artaxerxes
who favorably places you in his court,
and offers you satrapies and the like.
And you accept them with despair
these things that you do not want.
Your soul seeks other things, weeps for other things;
the praise of the public and the Sophists,
the hard-won and inestimable Well Done;
the Agora, the Theater, and the Laurels.
How can Artaxerxes give you these,
where will you find these in a satrapy;
and what life can you live without these.



by Constantine P. Cavafy (1910).