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The Short Films of Clara Kimball Young, 1909-1912: Reviews

Note, this is not necessarily all of the films for this year, just the ones for which I've been able to locate review or have viewing comments. For list of all the films, see the Filmography

I have not seen these films and cannot confirm Young's appearance in them. I have found that some films, for which she is listed in some sources, she does not actually appear (i.e. Ransomed, or, A Prisoner of War (1910), Lady Godiva (1911)). She was definitely at Vitagraph in 1912, but until I actually see her in one of these, I'm skeptical that she was there before that.



1909


Richelieu

1910


The Sepoy's Wife
The Last of the Saxons

1912


Cardinal Wolsey
The Old Kent Road
Dr. Lafleur's Theory
The Picture Idol (viewing comments and link to online video)
Half a Hero
Lulu's Doctor (viewing comments and link to online video)
The Troublesome Step-Daughters
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
Lincoln's Gettysburg Address
When Roses Wither
A Lively Affair
Wanted, a Sister
Popular Betty
A Vitagraph Romance
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
The Irony of Fate
Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgers
A Mistake in Spelling
Poet and Peasant
Lessons in Courtship (with viewing comments)
Lord Browning and Cinderella
(with viewing comments)
The Eavesdropper
In the Flat Above
Love Hath Wrought A Miracle
(with viewing comments)

1909

Richelieu, or The Conspiracy

Released Dec. 31, 1909. Vitagraph. Director: J. Stuart Blackton. Scenario: Eugene Mullin from Edwin Booth's adaptation of E. Bulwer Lytton's novel "Richelieu. Cast: Maurice Costello, William Humphreys, James Young? Clara Kimball Young?. 600 ft. Held by the George Eastman House (unconfirmed).

Review from Moving Picture World, January 22, 1910

"Richelieu" (Vitagraph).-A sumptuous and strongly dramatic production of an episode in the life of the famous Cardinal, dealing with a conspiracy in which the lives of important French government officials were threatened. Much time and money were expended upon the staging of this picture, and the costumes and settings are as nearly historically correct as it is possible to make them. A love story runs through the picture, adding materially to its interest, since jealousy, however repulsive an exhibition of it may be, supplies a reasonable motive for the movements of different actors which might not otherwise seem plain. Dramatically this picture will rank with the best productions of the Vitagraph's capable players. And what is perhaps more pleasing to a critical audience, the acting is well balanced and evenly sustained through the different scenes. Perhaps it is not too much to say that the acting is convincing, each actor giving what seems to be a good reason for his movements. Such elaborate pictures, presented with the beautiful stage settings and sumptuous costumes, add materially to the educational value of the motion picture, and what is of even more importance, they furnish an opportunity whereby those who cannot afford expensive theater tickets are enabled to see and enjoy dramatic masterpieces. The influence of such pictures is beneficial. They stimulate interest in important historic events and they graphically present the beauties of literary masterpieces. Under their influence public taste will improve and the artistic and literary impulses will be cultivated and become stronger. It is one important feature of the diffusion of artistic and literary education through the medium of the motion picture.

1910

The Sepoy's Wife

Released Sept. 17, 1910. Vitagraph. Cast: Maurice Costello, with Clara Kimball Young?. 990 ft. Held by the National Film and Television Archive, London (unconfirmed) and The Library of Congress (no reference copy as yet).

Review from Moving Picture World, September 24, 1910

"The Sepoy's Wife" (Vitagraph).-A drama based upon the facts of the Sepoy uprising in India in 1859, and the march of the Scotch Highlanders to the relief of Lucknow. The play is magnificently staged, and the scenes seem to be accurately reproduced. Some of the fighting is altogether too realistic for comfort. The scenes when the fight with the garrison is in progress is in progress are about as real as one cares to see on the screen or anywhere else. The Sepoy's wife is a well developed, well played character. Perhaps the English doctor represents a type that really had much to do with that uprising and were indirectly responsible for much of the disturbance of those times. A picture like this often sets one thinking and considering the various impressions and influences which lfow from the cttion of certain men or a certain type of men. And not infrequently such disturbances are fostered by the arrogant appearance or actions of those in authority.

The Last of the Saxons

Released October 8, 1910. Vitagraph. Director: J. Stuart Blackton. Cast: Clara Kimball Young? James Young? 1007 ft. Held by the National Film and Television Archive, London (unconfirmed).

Review in Moving Picture World, October 22, 1910

"The Last of the Saxons." (Vitagraph).-A spectacular production dealing with the episode in English history by which Harold, Duke of Wessex, came to the throne in 1066. Then came William the Conqueror, who defeated Harold at the Battle of Hastings, where Harold was slain, and William came to the throne on Christmas Day in 1066. The picture has to do with the love affairs of Harold and Lady Edith. The magnificent ceremonies connected with the betrothal are produced with care. Then comes the political necessity of marrying Princess Aldyth. But Harold and Lady Edith keep in communication. She is the one who bids him a mournful farewell just before he starts for the fatal battle, and it is she who searches for his body among the slain after the battle ends. Perhaps this is the most elaborate picture of the week. How accurately it may reproduce the scenes of which it treats the writer cannot say. Yet it has all the appearance of accuracy and it is produced with so much care that it seems safe to accept it as historically correct. Love stories are the same whether the principal characters be royalty or peasants; but the costuming and the staging afford opportunities to acquire knowledge of the life and customs of that time more graphically than would be possible by long reading. Here is where motion picture performs a service which cannot be equalled.

1912

Cardinal Wolsey

Released Mar. 2, 1912 Vitagraph. Director: J. Stuart Blackton and Lawrence Trimble. Scenario: Hal Reid, partly based on Henry VIII by William Shakespeare. Cast: Clara Kimball Young, with Hal Reid, Julia Swayne Gordon, Tefft Johnson, Robert Gaullard, Logan Paul, George Ober. 1000 ft Held by the National Film and Television Archive, London (unconfirmed).

Review from Moving Picture World, March 16, 1912

"CARDINAL WOLSEY" (Vitagraph). March 5.-This historical, dramatic series of scenes suggested by Shakespeare's "Henry VIII," is the week's big release. It is in one reel (1,000 feet); but it is so magnificently acted, costumed, set and pictured that it leaves a very deep impression. The great cardinal is played with most remarkable success by Mr. Hal Reid. This portrayal, we believe, reaches a very high plane of art and is very worth while seeing. Even if he were not Cardinal Wolsey, he was every inch a cardinal. Catherine of Arragon [sic] is played by Julia Swayne Gordon, who shows the outraged queen in a dignified, royal way that stirs our sympathy. Anne Boleyn is played by Clara Kimball Young, who makes the pretty young lady-in-waiting a bit frightened at first, yet not very reluctant. She seemed somewhat awed by her honors as she passed in the coronation pagent. This out-of-doors parade is the picture's only weak point. It wasn't very suggestive, hardly could be; because the cast couldn't fill the space and there were no spectators, no citizens crowding for a look at their new queen. It would have "got over" better, if it had passed through the hall-setting used in other scenes. Teft Johnson played King Henry and, at moments, looked very much indeed like this king's portrait. The picture is a big, educational feature. By the way, the reviewer got four people who were sitting near him into a discussion about it. They seemed to lose it altogether. One young boy of about eighteen seemed to think the cardinal was making love to the queen whom he was comforting.

The Old Kent Road

Released April 22, 1912.) Vitagraph. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Van Dyke Brooke, Kate Price, Maurice Costello, Charles Eldridge, Robert Gaillord, Adele De Garde. 1,000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture world, May 18, 1912

"THE OLD KENT ROAD"(Vitagraph), April 30. Mr. Van Dyke Brooke adds, in this picture, another very human characterization to his already admirable list. The "Old Kent Road" seems to stand for a fairly well defined station in life. Lowly it is; there's little room for vanity on the Old Kent Road. The old man and his family-Kate Price plays the mother; Miss Clara Kimball Young plays Sue; Mr. Costello, plays Sue's costermonger sweetheart, Harry-were well content until he gets a legacy. He and the family move out of the "Road," and their moving out is worth seeing. He now thinks Harry isn't good enough for Sue. All this, as well as the train of circumstances that brought him back again to "Old Road" and to the old simplicity and contentment, are told in a delightfully humanly droll way. IT makes what may be called a good heart-comedy. It isn't played for the loud laughs. It is very good. We notice in the picture also, Chas. Eldridge, Robert Gaillord and Miss Adele de Garde.

Dr. LaFleur's Theory

Clipping of Dr. LaFleur's Theory
A clipping which mistakenly dates the film to 1907! Van Dyke Brooke is also in the picture, seated at the table.

Released May 4, 1912. Vitagraph. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello, Van Dyke Brooke, James Morrison. 1,000 ft. Held by the Fundacion Cinemateca Argentina (unconfirmed)

Review from Moving Picture World, May 18, 1912

"DR. LAFLEUR"S THEORY" (Vitagraph), May 5. Dr. Lafleur, played by Mr. Costello, had a theory that crime was a disease. The picture's situation, which is interesting and commendably handled, brings him into contact with three crooks, played by Mr. Van Dyke Brooke, Miss Clara Kimball Young and Mr. Morrison. These three are in the thieving business. Dr. Lafleur breaks up this partnership and gives the love story of the girl and younger man a chance to grow. The picture is distinctly dramatic, very well acted and charmingly set and photographed. It is a good, strong picture.

The Picture Idol

Released May 25, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: James Young. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello, Charles Eldridge, James W. Morrison, Mrs. Mary Maurice. 1,000 ft. Held by The Nederlands Filmmusum with Dutch intertitles, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York,and the Archives do Film du CNC (unconfirmed). A sequence from this film Peter Delpeut's film Lyrisch Nitraat (AKA Lyrical Nitrate) (1991) and it is available online

Review from Moving Picture World, June 15, 1912

"THE PICTURE IDOL" (Vitagraph). May 31.-The Vitagraph Company was well supplied with a leading man to play this situation-its own star romantic hero filled the bill. All the players seem to have enjoyed playing it; it is full of good comedy and made, on Broadway, where it was perhaps best understood, many good, appreciative laughs. A schoolgirl, played by Clara Kimball Young, falls in love with a picture hero, played by Maurice Costello. The girl's parents (Mr. Eldridge and Mrs. Maurice), as well as her schoolboy sweetheart (Mr. Morrison), are troubled. The father goes to see the picture idol and they make up a plan to disillusion the girl. His table manners made laughs, but didn't quite cure the girl; so they made up one of the boys as the idol's wife, and got four kids to come in from the street. This did the business. The camera work was very good.

Viewing comments: In this amusing film, Young mugs shamelessly as a schoolgirl with a big crush on matinee idol Maurice Costello, who is not happy about her unwanted attentions. He plots with her parents to disillusion her. Interesting scenes of the inside and outside of a nickelodeon. Dutch intertitles, but perfectly easy to follow. Print viewed: (online video at Thought Equity)

Half a Hero

Released June 1, 1912. Vitagraph. Director & Scenario: James Young. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello, Charles Eldridge.

Review from Moving Picture World, June 29, 1912

"HALF A HERO" (Vitagraph). June 8.-A little country village comedy in which Mr. Costello plays a young grocer's clerk. This clerk and the daughter (Clara Kimball Young) of a G.A.R. fire-eater (Mr. Eldridge) are in love, much to the old man's disgust. He wants his daughter to marry a brave man, a soldier. AN unexpected denouement makes the clerk seem to be a hero. The plot is slight; but clever and fresh enough to be entertaining; but the scene-making and the acting are fine. That country store is perfect, and the coming of the fire engine, when the veteran's house is burning, seems like the real thing. The minor incidents are bright and snappy. A good picture.

Lulu's Doctor

Released June 8, 1912) Vitagraph. Director & Scenario: James Young. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice and Helene & Dolores Costello. 1000 ft. Held by the Nederlands Film Archives with Dutch intertitles, also available online. Formerly available on video from Grapevine on the compilation Matinee Ladies, a very contrasty print that is missing its final sequence. Also held by Eastman House (16 mm.)and UCLA (16mm).

Review from Moving Picture World, June 22, 1912

"LULU'S DOCTOR" (Vitagraph), June 10. A pleasant little picture that doesn't pretend to any special freshness, but one that has an exquisite scene in which little Helen Costello, as Lulu, a little orphan, helps Aunty Madge (Clara Kimball Young) at washing dishes. Aunty and her fiancé, the doctor (Maurice Costello), had had a quarrel. The little girl Lulu calls at his office, not knowing who he is, to have him doctor a broken doll. This is the beginning of a happy ending. The photography is excellent.

Viewing Comments

Viewing comments: Nederlands Filmmuseum verision: A much better print than the old Grapevine video which, as it turns out ended abruptly just before the end of the penultimate scene. This one ends abruptly as well, though. Van Dyke Brook is in the film as well. It's fun watching Maurice Costello getting to play with his little girl. Print viewed: (online video at Thought Equity)

Grapevine version:Charming story of a woman and her doctor boyfriend brought back together by her young sister's broken doll. On the Grapevine video the faces are quite washed out.


The Troublesome Step-Daughters

Released June 29, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: George D. Baker. Scenario: Marguerite Bertsch. Cast: John Bunny, Edith Storey, Clara Kimball Young, Norma Talmadge, Julia Swayne Gordon, Lillian Walker, Dorothy Kelly, Edith Halleran. 1,000 ft. A copy of this film is located at the Nederlands Filmmuseum in Amsterdam (35 mm, Dutch intertitles) and is available online

Viewing comments

John Bunny (with a mustache) is a widower with five young daughters. He is sent overseas for a few years and comes back with a new wife (Julia Swayne Gordon). He's shown her a picture of the girls but forgotten to tell her that it was taken several years before, and when she arrives she finds that the children are nearly grown up and quite unruly. Edith Story, Lillian Walker, Dorothy Kelly, Edith Ealleran, and Norma Talmadge play the girls--Norma being the most raucous. Clara Kimball Young has a bit working at the counter in the toy store. It's a fun little film and apparently in good condition. Print viewed: (online video at Thought Equity)

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address

Released June 29, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: J. Stuart Blackton and James Young. Scenario: Beta Breuil from Lincoln's speech. Cast: Ralph Ince, Tefft Jounston, James Young, Clara Kimball Young, L. Rogers Lytton, Edith Storey. 1,000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, June 15,1912

"Lincoln's Gettysburg Address"

A Vitagraph One-Reel Feature for Independence Day that Will Have a Perennial Value.

WHAT is so rare as a reliable historical moving picture? On a certain day in this month of June, the Vitagraph Company exhibited in private its Fourth of July release. It comes somewhere near being an historical picture. It agrees with what boys and girls are taught at school. It does not insult anyone's intelligence by dragging in some fictitious love affair, commonly known as "heart interest." The great trouble with almost every historical moving picture that has been made is, that the manufacturer or producer would persist in introducing an entirely foreign love episode, that never had anything to do with any part of American history.

Since the schools have begun to recognize the moving picture as a beneficial institution, the exhibitor has been more keen than ever to book reliable historical pictures, or at least those that will not give the school children a wrong idea of American history. The progressive picture theater manager wi know will hail with delight this latest Vitagraph feature, which is one of the best Forth of July offerings that has been made for a long time.

As a first assurance of success they left out the fictitious love story. They then proceeded to illustrate, step by step, that famous oration made by Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863. By Lincoln, the battlefield was dedicated as a national cemetery. His memorial speech on that occasion has come to be recognized as one of the classics o the English language. In the compass of a couple of hundred well chosen words, Lincoln embodied a composition that is remarkable for the great volume of thought which it contains. Each sentence of his address sums up a gigantic undertaking of days gone by or days to come. Each sentence contains a story, with great picture possibilities therein. The Vitagraph Company has simply taken this address and illustrated it, sentence by sentence, in such a capable manner as to class the entire picture as one of the finest war subjects that has ever been produced by a motion picture company. As an undertaking the picture represents great expense, study and patriotic sentiment. The expense of staging the battle scenes was enormous, to say nothing of the labor and patience involved in maneuvering hundreds of troops in such realistic sham battles. A sham battle in the open, from a military point of view, is one thing, and the feat of getting it within range of a motion picture camera is still another thing, more difficult than the former.

The picture begins with the sub-title repeating the first sentence of the Gettysburg address: "Forescore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation." LUTIONARY War, Conforming to this, the first scene represents the siege of Yorktown and the surrender of Lord Cornwallis to General Washington and other Revolutionary incidents, such as the famous trio of fifer, drummer and flag-bearer, who represent so well the Spirit of '76. The second phrase of the first sentence of Lincoln's address goes on as follows: "Conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.: This phrase, as a sub-title, opens to our vision the story of the Liberty Bell, ringing out its message of freedom to mankind, which falls as music upon the ears of the assembled multitude outside the State House at Philadelphia. A scene well done and entirely fraught with meaning to every American citizen. The second sentence of Lincoln's address begins. "Now we are engaged in a great Civil War." Another vista of the greatest magnitude opens its broad expanse with those words. IT involves the great Civil War with its momentous times and consequences, among which the Battle of Gettysburg was only one of many bloody conflicts. The sentence goes on to say: "Testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and dedicated can long endure," This brings us to the meditations of those wise and loyal men who were at that time in charge of the nation's affairs, and who brought their country through the crisis with such nobility and sacrifice. Lincoln's Cabinet is shown to illustrate the labors and anxieties of that faithful body of men. An so on through the famous address the scenes alluded to are one by one taken up and shown in the fullest of detail.

[Omitted, photo with cutline: A Meeting of Lincoln's Cabinet-Scene from the Vitagraph Patriotic Feature, "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address."]

Ralph Ince as Lincoln is, of course, the central figure of the picture. Hiss well-known characterization of Abraham Lincoln is conceded to be one of the best historical make-ups that has ever been seen in moving pictures of elsewhere. Mr. Ince has made a special study of Lincoln. In his portrayal of that character, he has gone far beneath the surface or exterior appearance. He has studied Lincoln's moods and manners and gestures. He has exhausted many volumes to perfect the personal characteristics of the martyred President. On a number of other occasions he has appeared in the character of Lincoln, and no one who has seen hem play the part will ever forget it.

[Omitted, photo with the cutline: Slaveship Scene from "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address."]

This picture of "Lincoln's Gettysburg Address" was conceived by that splendid actor, Mr. James Young. The idea and inspiration were his, and for that he deserves much credit. He also had a considerable part in the making of the production, although no one man deserves the credit for the entire production. Mr. J. Stuart Blackton is the man who really put through the finer points of photographic work and studio ensembles, including some double and triple exposure work that reveals the hand of a wizard. Mr. Young, having been a military man, had much to do with the battle scenes, while they were being taken. These battle scenes are the kind that start the blood in one's veins. There is one of them where the artillery firing from the edge of a plateau that is a little masterpiece of composition. It reminds one of those exquisite groupings of Edouard D'Etaile or Meissosnier.

"Lincoln's Gettysburg Address" is one a mere transitory Forth of July release, it is one of those efforts that will last, like a well written book. It can be used on every patriotic holiday throughout the year, and no one would become weary of looking at it. It is a great undertaking, well done, and it is a pleasure to recommend it, not only to moving picture men, but to everybody. Release date, July 3. H.F.H.

When Roses Wither

Released June 22, 1912 Vitagraph. Director and Scenario: James Young. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello, Mary Maurice. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, July 13, 1912

"WHEN ROSES WITHER" (Vitagraph). June 26. Mrs. Maurice is interesting in a drama of which pathos is the chief note. Costello and Miss Young carry out their parts acceptably, but it cannot be said there is much to be said of the story as a story.

Review from Moving Picture World, vol. 12 no. 12 June 22, 1912, page 1154

WHEN ROSES WITHER (June 26) -- After the death of her husband, Mrs. Bennett is left alone in the old farmhouse to dwell upon the memories and keepsakes of the past. Her son Howard, who went out into the world at an early age, now a man of wealth, residing in the city, is married to a woman of social prominence. He wants his mother to come to the city to live with him. She is loathe to leave. She takes particular pleasure in her little rose garden, in which are the graves of her husband and daughter. Howard does everything possible to make her residence with his pleasant, but she does not seem to enter into the modern ideas of society. She grieves, and longs to be back in the quiet and hallowed surroundings of her own home. She gets possession of the key, which she had given to her son when she left the old farmhouse. Gathering her few belongings together, she leaves the mansion and makes her way back to her own domicile. As she passes through her garden she finds the roses withered and pauses to shed a loving tear over the graves of her dear ones. She enters the old sitting room, sits down to rest and meditate in sweet communion with her cherished memories. Opening her Bible, she finds between the pages the pressed roses, tokens of her husband's thought of her. Her son discovers his mother's absence. He and his wife go to his mother's home, where they find her sitting in the old arm chair, with the open Bible before her, her finger pointing to the words: "And in this place again, they shall enter into My rest!" a smile upon her lips, gone to meet those who have gone before her.

A Lively Affair

Released July 13, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: James Young from a story by Alice M. Moore. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Leo Delaney, Kate Price. 650 ft. The Library of Congress is listed as a holding library in the FIAF Treasures database for this film, but what they have is an earlier suffragette comedy that does not have Young in it.

Review from Moving Picture World, July 24, 1912

"A Lively Affair" (Vitagraph), July 16.-A clever comedy written by Alice M. Moore and played by Clara Kimball Young and Leo Delaney. There's a slip in the picture which may confuse some of those who see it. The landlady, Mrs. Price, brings a litter into Delaney's room and puts it on the dresser. One or two scenes later the postman delivers the same missive.

Wanted, a Sister

Released July 20, 1912. 1000 ft. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with George Cooper, James Young, Lillian Walker, Julia Swayne Gordon, Rosemary Theby.

Review from Moving Picture World, August 12, 1913

"WANTED, A SISTER" (Vitagraph), July 22.--A comedy revolving around aclever female impersonaltion. The plot seems to have been built with a view to utilizing hte company's available material; it is clever, but lacks real freshness. THe situation is kept clear, it is now allowe d to drag, and it amuses; but it has no laugh-compelling memonts. THe acting is fine. Mr. Geo. Cooper plays the "sister"; his work is well known and is good. Mr. Young plays the man who needed a sister, so that his fiancee (Clara K. Young) would believe his excuse. SHe had caught him in a restaurant with another girl. Miss Walker and Mrs. Gordon also appear in it. The mechanical work and photography are as usual with this make of picture, excellent.

Popular Betty

Released Sept. 7, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Adaptation: Daisy R. Stone. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Dorothy Kelly, Harold Wilson, James Young, Charles E. Bennett. 600 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, Sept. 28, 1912

"POPULAR BETTY" (Vitagraph), Sept. 14.-A summer hotel farce with a good, fresh idea that makes it so. Miss C.K. Young plays Betty, a society girl who "escaped" to a hotel where she wasn't known. Miss Dorothy Kelly and the other girls at the place are jealous of Bettty and this, with what comes of it, makes the picture acceptably dramatic. Mr. Harold Wilson, Mr. James Young and Mr. Chas. E. Bennet have roles. Miss Daisy R. Stone is the authoress; Mr. J. Young, the producer.

A Vitagraph Romance

Released Sept. 14, 1912. Vitagraph. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with James Morrison, Edward Kimball, Flora Finch, James Young, Florence Turner, J. Stuart Blackton, Maurice Costello, Albert Smith, "Pop" Rock. Held by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Blackhawk Films (both 16mm.) and The Nederlands Film Archives (the most complete print but with Dutch intertitles). 1,000 ft.

Review of Moving Picture World, September 28, 1912

"A Vitagraph Romance" (Vitagraph), Sept. 18.-A dandy offering that we feel sure will please. It tells a good story convincingly and uses the Vitagraph plant as a background and in a very interesting way. The romance has its beginning at a seaside resort of which we have seen some pretty glimpses. It is here that a young author (James Morrison) meets and falls in love with the daughter of a senator (Clara Kimball Young). The senator (Edward Kimball) refuses his consent and sends the girl to boarding school where we find Flora Finch as the principal. There's a moonlight elopement from the school troubled waters for the young people and then they get a job with The ViItagraph Company where at length the forgiving senator finds them. The Vitagraph scenes are very good. In the office, Messrs. W.T. Rock, A.E. Smith and J. Stewart Blackton are in consultation. Mr..S.M. Spedon enters for a moment just before the senator is introduced. The visitor is conducted through the yard so to the studio where one of Miss Florence Turner's pictures is being made. This he interrupts to greet his daughter right in the middle of a scene. Mr. James Young is both author and producer and has made an excellent offering. The Irony of Fate. Released Sept. 21, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: Hettie Gray Baker. Cast: Florence Turner, E.K. Lincoln, Rogerly Hon, James Young, Clara Kimball Young. 1,000 ft.

Viewing Comments

Nederlands Film Archives print (online video at Thought Equity): To my surprise, another copy of this film turned up on the internet, much more complete than the Blackhawk version, but with intertitles in Dutch. This one begins with the efforts of the lovers to convince her father to let them marry, and their elopement, prior to the scenes at the Vitagraph Studio. These scenes lack the explanatory intertitles identifying the various people in the shots. There is a lovely shot of the lovers walking on the beach, dodging waves. The film ends abruptly.

Blackhawk/MOMA: This print has only a few minutes of this film, consisting mostly of the scenes of movie-making and the backstage scenes at the Vitagraph studio.

The Irony of Fate

Released Sept. 21, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: Hettie Gray Baker. Cast: Florence Turner, E.K. Lincoln, Rogerly Hon, James Young, Clara Kimball Young. 1,000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, October 12, 1912

"THE IRONY OF FATE" (Vitagraph). Sept. 28.-There is a widely-known poem telling of two who were made for each other and who came very near meeting, but never did. It is extremely sentimental and furnishes the idea used in this picture. Florence Turner plays thelead and the picture's quality comes not from the idea, which, after all, is not very deep or true, but from the handling. It was a poor choice of subject, for its very essence is a negation of action and, at every change in the situation, the action is quickly completed and ended. What is more, we don't believe that fatalism will appeal strongly to action-loving Americans. That it is finely acted and has well-made scenes is certain, but it is not dramatic. It was written by Hettie Gray Baker and produced by Albert WL. Hale. Besides Florence Turner; E.K. Lincoln, Roger Lytton, James Young, and Clara Kimball Young are in the cast.

Mrs. Lirriper's Lodgers

Released Oct. 12, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Scenario: W.A. Tremayne, from a chapter by Charles Dickens. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Mary Maurice, Courtney Foote, Van Dyke Brooke. 1,000 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, October 26, 1912

"MRS. LIRRIPER'S LODGERS" (Vitagraph), October 14.-Mr. Van Dyke Brooke, who produced this picture, an adaptation of a chapter from Dickens by W. A. Tremayne, and who also plays an important role in it, has made a thoroughly delightful offering, full of the real Dickens' atmosphere and full of old-time courtliness. Mrs. Mary Maurice plays Mrs. Lirriper and her work and her kindly face are too well known to need further comment. She fills the part of this very human boarding house keeper in a very pleasing way. Clara K. Young plays Mr. Edson, [sic] whom her worthless husband (Courtney Foote) abandons at Mrs. Lirriper's. Van D. Brooke plays Major Jackman. It is surely a fine offering and its humanity and heart interest pleased a large audience.

A Mistake in Spelling

Released Oct. 19, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: W.A.Tremayne. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello and Kate Price. 1,000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, November 2, 1912

"A MISTAKE IN SPELLING" (Vitagraph), Oct. 19.-Pretty comedy-drama in which Mr. Costello and Miss Yung have the leads. Mr. Costello, starting on a business trip to Europe, sends telegrams en route to New York assuring the young woman of his love. In the city just before boarding the steamer he sends another of which an error makes read "I leave you forever." The comedy comes when a messenger boy wakes Kate Price and gets her out of bed at 1:30 A.M. in order that the fiancée he assured that the man still loves her. Of course the fiancée is very much depressed at the receipt of the wrong message, but all is happily straightened out at the end of the trip.

Poet and Peasant

Released October. 26, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: W.V. Ranous. Scenario: W.L. Tremayne. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Herbert L. Barry, Charles Eldridge, James Young. 1,000 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, November 16, 1912

"POET AND PEASANT" (Vitagraph), October 31.-A modern story of France, telling the love of a beautiful peasant girl for a poet who left her to die of a broken heart. There is a hunchback in the village hopelessly in love with the girl, and pictured as watching her fading away in inner torment which he does not try to conceal. Mr. H. L. Barry plays the poet; Clara Kimball Young, the peasant girl. Her grace and beauty add much to the picture. Charles Eldridge plays the father, and James Yung, the hunchback. Mr. Young has done excellent work, but is weak in this role. The scenario is by W.L. Tremayne, and the producer is W. V. Ranous, who has been remarkably successful in giving it an old world atmosphere.

Lessons in Courtship

(1912) Cast: E. K. Lincoln, CKY, George Cooper, Lillian Walker. Released Oct. 26, 1912/ Held by the Nederlands Filmmuseum (preserved) and is available online at Thought Equity

Viewing Comments

Not sure what is going on, but they are sure having fun doing it. Clara and Lillian Walker seem to be playing a trick on their boyfriends or something, they laugh themselves silly while watching one of the men put on a dress. We get a nice shot of Clara's shoes. Rather a short film, but enjoyable.

Lord Browning and Cinderella

Released Nov. 9, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Scenario: Josephine W. Crawford. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Maurice Costello, Julia Swayne Gordon Flora Finch, Leah Baird, Van Dyke Brooke. 1000 ft. Held by The Library of Congress (35 mm.) and The National Film and Television Archive, London (unconfirmed)

Review from Moving Picture World, November 30, 1912

"LORD BROWNING AND CINDERELLA" (Vitagraph), Nov. 13. -Cinderella pictures have from the start an advantage over others in one of the best situations possible. But in comparison with others of its kind, this very improbably and not very carefully made story of an English nobleman and an American mamma with two daughters and a stepdaughter suffers. One scene seems quite carelessly made. It show the Cinderella (Clara K. Young), slipshodly dressed, coming into a room where her mother and sisters, in stylish clothes, are seated. We haven't ben prepared by any insight into her state of mind regarding her short skirt, and for a moment she seems slovenly and s cheapened. Lord Browning's attitude toward the girls (he had merely heard about them as Americans) is super-romantic, and Cinderella is also cheapened by her attitude toward him, whom she has also only heard of. The authoress is Josephine W. Crawford, and the producer , Van Dyke Brooke. Maurice Costello is Lord Browning. Julia S. Gordon is the American mamma. Flora Finch the oldest, and Leah Baird the middle daughter. Van Dyke Brooke is the fisherman.

Viewing Comments

Charming fairy tale of a modern day Cinderella, attractively portrayed by Young, with Maurice Costello as her Prince Charming.

The Eavesdropper

Released Nov. 23, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Scenario: Eugene Mullin. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with Kenneth Casey, Adele De Garde, James Young, Kate Price, Rose Coughlan.

Review from Moving Picture World, December 14, 1912

"THE EVESDROPPERS' (Vitagraph), November 28.-On th same reel as the foregoing [Three Girls and a Man] is this little skit featuring Adele De Garde and Kenneth Casey. Mr. and Miss Young have the adult parts. The group makes a lot of fun.

In the Flat Above

Released Nov. 23, 1912. Vitagraph. Director & Scenario: James Young. Cast: Clara Kimball Young with L. Rogers Lytton, Flora Finch, Kate Price, James Young. 1000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, December 14, 1912

IN THE FLAT ABOVE (Vitagraph), Nov. 26.-An apartment house farcical love story with Roger Lytton as the occupant of the apartment above. He is an annoyed bachelor when a vocal music teacher, Clara Kimball Young, moves into the apartment below. His dislike isn't softened by the fact that he meets Flora Finch, a student, coming out and thinks she is the instructor. A little later, Kate Price, also a student, meets him and gives him a tongue thrashing The climax isn't convincing enough even for a farce, and the amusement that their roles gave the players, especially those who sing, kept them from seeming so amusing as they might have. James Young is both author and producer; but it surely isn't up to his good work.

Love Hath Wrought A Miracle

Released Dec. 28, 1912. Vitagraph. Director: James Young. Author: Beta Breuil. Cast: Clara Kimball Young, Rose Graham, James Young. 1000 ft. Held by the Library of Congress (35 mm.) and the National Film and Television Archive, London.

Review from Moving Picture World, January 18, 1913

"LOVE HATH WROUGHT A MIRACLE" (Vitagraph), Jan. 1.--Mrs. Breuil has used a very good idea in this picture which, at its climax, brings out the healing power of a great emotion/ but it is not one that is easy to make effective in cinematography and in this picture it is acted with (for a Vitagraph offering) startling amateurishness. The play who takes the leading part and on whom the whole picture necessarily depends, is unknown to us; we have never seen him before in any picture before, but he certainly fails in this. James Young produced it and Clara K. Young and Rose Graham have parts.

Viewing Comments

Young plays a woman who runs an orphanage at a house next door to an embittered wheelchair-bound man.


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Last revised, January 23, 2012