Norma Talmadge home


The Short Films of Norma Talmadge, 1914: Reviews

Note, this is not necessarily all of the films for this year, just the ones for which I've been able to locate review or have viewing comments. For list of all the films, see the Filmography



Officer John Donovan
The Vavasour Ball
His Little Page
Sawdust and Salome
(with viewing comments)
The Hero
The Sacrifice of Kathleen
Old Reliable
A Helpful Sisterhood
(with viewing comments and link to online video)
Cupid Versus Money
Miser Murray's Wedding Present
The Right of Way
A Wayward Daughter
Fogg's Millions
John Rance, Gentleman
(with viewing comments)
The Memories in Men's Souls
The Hidden Letters
Politics and the Press
The Loan Shark King
The Peacemaker
Goodbye Summer
Under False Colors
The Curing of Myra May
Sunshine and Shadows
A Question of Clothes


Officer John Donovan

Released January 10, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Scenario: Van Dyke Brooke and W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Kate Price, Anders Randolf. 2000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, January 24, 1914

OFFICER JOHN DONOVAN (Vitagraph). January 10-This is an absorbing two-reel number, featuring Van Dyke Brook as a policeman, who subsequently becomes a detective. Leo Delaney appears as the wayward son and Kate Price and Norma Talmadge are in the cast. This is a straight-away crook story, with good views of the gang's headquarters. The raid in the second reel is exciting and the substitution of the detective for Mike Ellis was done very convincingly. Realistic crook drama.


The Vavasour Ball

Released January 20, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Scenario: Marguerite Bertsch from a story by Frances Livingstone. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Ada Gifford, Arthur Ashley. 2000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, February 7, 1914

THE VAVASOUR BALL (Vitagraph). January 20-This fine two-reel subject is notable for several factors. By all odds the best is the character work of Van Dyke Brooke as the Jewish pawnbroker. It is straight portrayal. Mr. Brooke makes of the pawnbroker a kindly old man, strict in business and worshipping his daughter. Leo Delaney is the playwright and Norma Talmadge is his wife, who pawns her necklace when her husband tells her he cannot afford to buy her a new gown for the ball. Ada Gifford is the daughter of the pawnbroker who from her father's safe abstracts the necklace that she may wear it to another ball. All do splendid work. Mr. Brooke is also entitled to the credit of directing the production. The staging is done with unusual care, the scenes of the ball and the settings of the pawnbroker's shop and home being especially praiseworthy. The story holds all the way and contains many dramatic moments. It is written by Francis Livingstone.

Another review from Moving Picture World, January 10, 1914

"The Vavasour Ball."

Special Vitagraph Feature in Two Parts

Reviewed by Louis Reeves Harrison.

High comedy of original plot, this entertaining feature offers a criticism of character that is effective without being obtrusive; amusing in its situations, it drives straight at a dangerously common form of vanity and incidentally touches on the delicate art of lying without uttering a word. But for the nourishment furnished by press agents and trade-paper boosters, lying might suffer a serious relapse into the coma of commonplace, now that telling the truth and staying sober are becoming fashionable.

Francis Livingston is credited with being the author of "The Vavasour Ball," and talented Marguerite Bertsch had to do with its reconstruction-she "picturized" it-but they both skimmed over and skirted around some of the complications resulting from the plot. Perhaps they were limited to two reels, but interest was aroused in several minor issues brought to no conclusion. A thumb-nail sketch of the story may serve in explanation.

Leo Delaney, dramatist, tells his wife, Nora [sic] Talmadge, via subtitle, that he cannot spare her money "for a new gown," as he needs to put on his "new play." She is set on having a new gown for the Vavasour Ball and decides to pawn her only necklace, one of peculiar design, without telling her husband how she managed to raise the money. She leaves the jewels with a pawnbroker, Van Dyke Brooke, satisfies her sex craving-ladies depend upon appearances rather than conduct to make an impression-and goes to the ball in gorgeous array, explaining the absence of the necklace by declaring it out of harmony with her attire.

She goes alone, while the husband, who had intended to stay home and scheme-he has already tried to borrow from the same pawnbroker-is induced to look in at a less formal affair at the studio of an artist in search of Hebrew types for a great picture. The artist has invited, with characteristic lack of discrimination, the daughter of the pawnbroker, Ada Gifford, and she steals the necklace from her father's safe from the same motive that led the dramatist's wife to pawn her jewels. The dramatist recognizes the necklace at the artist's studio, pretends to love the wearer and manages to obtain possession of the coveted article. He makes a quick getaway, goes home an finds the pawn ticket in a safe where the jewels were kept. Meanwhile, the loss is discovered, and the man who hurried away is suspected. The unhappy Jewess returns home in shame and confesses her guilt. Ethics become decidedly mixed when the dramatist visits the pawnbroker with both trinket and ticket and holds up the poor old man for a heavy loan.

Unless the moral that virtue is its own reward is to be conveyed, the honest pawnbroker being the principal sufferer, the young Jewess should have entered at the moment of the hold-up and identified the thief. "When a reasonable expectation is aroused, it can be baffled only at the author's peril," says an authority on play-making. The situation would have become more complicated than ever, big enough for one or two more reels, and some delightful ingenuity could however, and serves its purpose, though in lesser degree than have been expended in solving it. The comedy is well acted, might have been expected under the circumstances. Perhaps it would be spoiled by any attempt to make it appear probable. One who is well-posted on the subject says "in this day of discreditable facts, lying for its own sake has become one of the fine arts." [note: this paragraph actually reads this way in the original, perhaps they left out a line]


His Little Page

Released Feb. 14, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney. 1000 ft

Review from Moving Picture World, March 7, 1914

HIS LITTLE PAGE (Vitagraph), Feb. 20.-A comedy number, in which the young artist attires his wife as a boy page in order to deceive his uncle, who is opposed to matrimony. Not a very new idea, but handled in an enjoyable manner. Van Dyke Brooke, Norma Talmadge and Leo Delaney in the cast. The photography is excellent.


Sawdust and Salome

Released February 14, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Valentine Fulton. Cast: Norma Talmadge, T, Leo Delaney, Van Dyke Brooke, Wm. Shea, Louise Beaudet, Jane Fearnley, Ada Gifford. 1000 ft. A copy of this film is in the Blackhawk Film collection. This film is available on video.

Review from Moving Picture World, February 28, 1914

SAWDUST AND SALOME (Vitagraph), Feb. 16-A love story of well defined type that will please. Its heroine (Norma Talmadge) is a clean-hearted circus performer who, as bride of the son of social climbers (Leo Delaney, too old for this part), is not acceptable to her "in-laws." It is shown that the girl, whom the man's parents wanted him to marry, dances a Salome whirl at a ball. The man finds his young wife, who has been snubbed, about to run away to the clean sawdust and, looking back at Salome, decides to go with her. Of its situations, half are fresh and half are old. It is well made, clear and will be counted a good entertainment.

Viewing comments

Sawdust and Salome (1914) is a bit of a letdown, being comparatively abrupt and underdeveloped. Norma plays a circus girl married to a young man who's family disapproves ("You have married a woman who has worn tights"!). After the witnessing one of his society friends at a costume party dancing very badly in a belly dance costume (worn over a chemise, of course), she leaves him to return "to the clean circus sawdust."

Print viewed: Videotape: The Films of Norma Talmadge (1911-1916). B & W. The tape runs approximately two hours and has an appropriate musical score. The Films of Norma Talmadge is now available on DVD from Grapevine Video, though the films are the same analog transfers as were on the videotape, which Jack Hardy notes on his site.


The Hero

Released Feb. 21, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Frederick Thompson. Author: Florence E. Turner. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Hughie Mack, James Morrison, George Cooper, William Shea, Frederick Thompson. 750 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, March 14, 1914

THE HERO (Vitagraph), Feb. 25.-This offering did make some laugh in the audience. There is no accounting for different tastes, but how such a cute little picture of femininity as Nora [sic] Talmadge could admire a creature of avoirdupois as Hughie Mack, presented, in comparison with her brother's friend is beyond ken. Mr. Mack was very unctuous in his role. James Morrison, George Cooper and William Shea ably assisted in the making of this an amusing number. The photography is as good as the Vitagraph brand always make.


The Sacrifice of Kathleen

Released February 28, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: George C. Patterson. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Leo Delaney, Van Dyke Brooke, Juanita Sponsler. 2000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, March 21, 1914

THE SACRIFICE OF KATHLEEN (Vitagraph), Mar. 3.-An acceptable two-part story through which, although the situation is not wholly convincing as shown and therefore does not get across with any "grip," there is a deeply interesting human drift. It is freshly conceived, clearly told, never drags and has a good romantic atmosphere. The truly interesting figure in it is the slavey, played by Norma Talmadge. She doesn't look anything like a slavey, except in the first scenes, but she puts over the emotional content of the developing situation strongly and makes a very pleasing human heart portrayal. The author is George C. Peterson and Van Dyke Brooke produced it. The camera work is good.


Old Reliable

Released March 14, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Wm. A Tremaynen. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Anders Randolf, Julia Swayne Gordon, Arthur Cozine. 2000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, April 4, 1914

OLD RELIABLE (Vitagraph), Mar. 21.-This two-part subject introduced a beautiful character, "Old Reliable," portrayed by Van Dyke Brooke, who made of it such a lovable old fellow, in his tribulations, that one almost forgot it was a picture. There was some frivolousness in some of the acting that marred one or two scenes and the continuity of the story seemed broken in the second reel. However, it is enjoyable and the finale bears with it a lesson and a moral that is wholesome.


A Helpful Sisterhood

Released March 28, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Margaret P. Dryden. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Van Dyke Brooke, Mary Weirman, Mary Maurice, Marie Tenen, Ernest Cozzens, Mary Anderson, Cortland Van Deusen, Arthur Cozine, Constance Talmadge. 2000 ft. This film is available on video, and online at the The Internet Archive and Google Video (sorry, the quality is not so good)

Review from Moving Picture World, April 18, 1914

A HELPFUL SISTERHOOD (Vitagraph), Mar. 31.-There are peculiarities about this offering that to the reviewer seem faulty. If the working out of the plot were as clear as the photography it would be a superior picture. The bevy of girls in the cast, in good looks and acting could scarcely be improved upon.

Viewing comments

The Helpful Sisterhood has an affecting performance by Talmadge, at first a carefree and rather silly young girl who joins a fashionable sorority, then increasingly despondent and desperate as the financial demands of keeping up with her friends becomes too much for her. I can't imagine how the above reviewer thought the plot unclear, it actually made a lot more sense than many of these short films. There is a lovely atmospheric close to the film. In addition, sister Constance is clearly visible as one or the sorority girls.

Print viewed: Videotape: The Films of Norma Talmadge (1911-1916). B & W. The tape runs approximately two hours and has an appropriate musical score. The Films of Norma Talmadge is now available on DVD from Grapevine Video, though the films are the same analog transfers as were on the videotape, which Jack Hardy notes on his site.


Cupid Versus Money

Released May 2, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: George Wood. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Leo Delaney, Rose Tapley, Van Dyke Brooke, James Lackaye, Mr. Marble, Mrs. Kimball. 2 reels.remaynen. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Anders Randolf, Julia Swayne Gordon, Arthur Cozine. 2000 ft.

Review from Moving Picture World, May 16, 1914

CUPID VERSUS MONEY (Vitagraph), May 4.-Norma Talmadge and Leo Delaney, showing a fine appreciation of the subtlety of the comedy situations, make this picture a particularly good one. Mary Drew (Miss Talmadge) marries Tom Hardy (Mr. Delaney) to comply with the provisions of her uncle's will, the agreement calling for a separation immediately after the wedding ceremony. Cupid steps in and routs Mammon, making he separation of the newlyweds impossible


Miser Murray's Wedding Present

Released May 9, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: George M. Plympton. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Rose Tapley, Leo Delaney, Jack Harvey, Anders Randolf, Mr. Hines.

Review from Moving Picture World, May 23, 1914

MISER MURRAY'S WEDDING PRESENT (Vitagraph), May 11.-A legitimate comedy presentation with a love story on the side to give the picture a wide appeal. How a miser who has been compelled to give his daughter an expensive wedding gift, and has stolen the gift back again, is made quite liberal, with the aid of a pseudo detective and the police, is unfolded in the plot.


The Right of Way

Released June 6, 1914.Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Van Dyke Brooke, Leo Delaney, Harry Northrup, Logan Paul, Anders Randolf. 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, June 27, 1914

THE RIGHT OF WAY (Vitagraph), June 9.-A two-reel pictureplay that is full of intrigue and intense interest. Many complications occur. An unscrupulous financier determines to get the right of way for a railroad which is being put through. He has little conscience in his operations and disregards the welfare of all others in his transactions. Eventually he is forced to buy the right of way at an equitable price. A very good and well produced picture.


A Wayward Daughter

Released June 13, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Van Dyke Brooke, Harry Northrup, Kalman Matus, Mrs. A. E. Eberle, Mr. Kendall. 2 reels

Review from Moving Picture World, July 4, 1914

A WAYWARD DAUGHTER (Vitagraph), June 16.-This picture is in two parts and although somewhat conventional in plot and theme contains much that is of heart interest and should be a wholesome lesson to girls who are disposed to be headstrong, and to disregard the admonitions of their parents and friends. This is a well-produced picture in both city and country scenes. Norma Talmadge, as Betty, the wayward girl, gives a clever portrayal of the part, and Van Dyke Brooke as Luke Hardy, the country storekeeper and postmaster, is impressive. All the characters are well sustained. An offering worthy of a place on any program.


Fogg's Millions

Released July 11, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Elizabeth R. Carpenter. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Rose Tapley, Van Dyke Brooke, Beatrice McKay, Kalman Matus, Harry Kendall, Jack Harvey, Antonio Moreno, Harry Davenport. 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, August 1, 1914

FOGG'S MILLIONS (Vitagraph), July 14.-This is a well-produced two-part picture in all respects, and it holds the attention of the spectator by its sheer worthiness. It contains much that demonstrates human frailties, which in the end-in sequence-boomerangs to punish the culprits. Elizabeth R. Carpenter must be given the credit for having produced a splendid vehicle for a superior cast. Van Dyke Brooke, who plays the leading part, Peter Fogg, is the director. Jack Harvey portrays in a natural manner the wronged husband. Norma Talmadge, Kalman Matus and Harry Kendall are in the cast.


John Rance, Gentleman

Released July 25, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author. Elizabeth R. Carpenter. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Antonio Moreno, Harry Kendall. 2 reels. This film is available on video

Review from Moving Picture World, July 25, 1914

"JOHN RANCE, GENTLEMAN"-(Special.-two parts--July 28).-John Rance, a young hospital interne, becomes ill from overwork and goes to a summer hotel for rest. There her meets Lesbia vane, a frivolous, pleasure-seeking girl, who flirts with him. On return to the city, Lesbia scorns John's love and flouts him. He is heartbroken, leaves the hospital and takes up medical work among the sailors. He meets an old friend, George Cummings, who is about to start on a cruise around the world. John tells him of Lesbia, without disclosing the girl's name. Cummings, while abroad, meets and marries Lesbia. Three years later, he returns with her to America and invites John to come and visit them. Lesbia is cold and indifferent to her husband's love, and when she and John come face to face, realizes she really loves him. She essays the role of temptress, but John turns from her coldly. Later, her husband overhears lesbian passionately declaring her love for his friend, who tells her, "I love you as of old, but your husband is my dearest friend." Cummings is dazed, and disappears, leaving a note saying he wishes to make lesbian and John happy by his action. John finds the note, and later, his friend's body, realizes the tremendous sacrifice Cummings has made, and determines his own renunciation shall be as great. Shortly afterwards when Lesbia tells him, "I am free, I am wealthy ; let us be happy," John sternly hands her the note left by her husband. Her better self is awakened and with an understanding of the nobility of the two men turns sadly away, leaving John Rance alone with the consciousness of having been true to his friend and himself.

Moving Picture World, August 15, 1914.

"JOHN RANCE, GENTLEMAN" (Vitagraph), July 28.-This two-part picture is very commendable in all respects. The author is Elizabeth R. Carpenter and the director, van Dyke Brooke, has ably produced it. Norma Talmadge, Antonio Moreno and Harry Kendall have the leading roles. The theme of the plot is full of heart interest and illustrates that even when a man is tempted by a woman whom he dearly loves he remains faithful to his friend. Mr. Moreno makes of John Rance a noble character. This is a superior number.

Viewing comments

John Rance-Gentleman (1914) has Norma in an unsympathetic role as Lesbia Vane, a spoiled society girl who flirts with and abandons a very handsome but rather dull young doctor, played by another future star, Antonio Moreno. She even lights up a cigarette when she rejects him, so we know she's bad news. She married his best friend, an avid hunter, and apparently tired of living in a house full of dead animals, throws herself at Moreno. The denouement is rather bizarre. Unfortunately, the print quality of this film is very bad--faded and washed out-and it seems to be slipping off the screen, with most of the intertitles not fully visible.

Print viewed: Videotape: The Films of Norma Talmadge (1911-1916). B & W. The tape runs approximately two hours and has an appropriate musical score. The Films of Norma Talmadge is now available on DVD from Grapevine Video, though the films are the same analog transfers as were on the videotape, which Jack Hardy notes on his site.


The Memories in Men's Souls

Released August 1, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: James Hopper. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Van Dyke Brooke, Antonio Moreno, Walter Horton, Charles Eldridge, Thomas Gordon, Audrey Berry, Grace E. Stevens . 2 reels. A copy of this film is located at the National Film and Television Archive in London (35 mm.)

THE MEMORIES IN MEN'S SOULS (Vitagraph), August 6.-This two-part drama contains many thrilling situations full of heart interest. Van Dyke Brooke, Norma Talmadge and Antonio Moreno have the leading parts. A little child, who is very clever, saves his father from dishonor. He remains loyal to his child and wife. There is a sand ending to this finely-produced offering. It holds the strictest attention.


The Hidden Letters

Review from Moving Picture World, September 19, 1914

THE HIDDEN LETTERS (Vitagraph), September 1.--A two-part drama featuring Norma Talmadge, Julius [sic!] Swayne Gordon and Antonio Moreno, supported by an excellent company. A young girl falls deeply in love with a man whom she thinks is unmarried. She finds out that the wife is carrying on a flirtation with her cousin, an artist. The woman is killed in an automobile accident and the girl, to obtain letters written to the wife by her cousin, surreptitiously enters the residence of the man she loves. In an intense scene occuring when he surprises her in her search, he shows her the bundle of letters which he has already found. Realizing the sacrifice she is making for his welfare, he asks to to later become his wife. This is a well acted and highly interesting picture.


Politics and the Press

Released September 12, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Wm. A. Tremayne Cast: NT, Antonio Moreno, Van Dyke Brooke.

Review from Moving Picture World, October 3, 1914

POLITICS AND THE PRESS (Vitagraph), September 17.-Written by William A. Tremayne. Van Dyke Brook [sic] did the directing and also had the role of the political boss of Griggsville, a rube city. Norma Talmadge appears as his daughter. The Press, a local newspaper, is opposed to him and he scares the editor our of town. A new one arrives (Antonio Moreno) who refused to be scared and then war is declared, which furnishes the action for many intense scenes. In the finale the young editor's life is saved by the boss's daughter, and then there is a love mix-up, of course


The Loan Shark King

Released October 3, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Laura Colfax. Cast: Norma Talmadge, with Van Dyke Brooke, Antonio Moreno. A copy of this film is available at the National Film and Television Museum in London (35 mm.)

Review from Moving Picture World, October 24, 1914

THE LOAN SHARK KING (Vitagraph), October 8.-The author of this picture play, Laura Colfax has written a very convincing story, the scenes of which call heavily upon the sympathy of the audience. A father through his avarice brings suffering and death to his own child. There is a fine illustration of a young husband being forced to obtain a loan from the "loan shark," to provide necessities for his sick wife, for the payments of which he is hounded to desperation. Van Dyke Brooke, Norma Talmadge and Antonio Moreno most ably portray the leading characters. There is a surprising denouement which makes of this a most pleasing offering.


The Peacemaker

Released October 10, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Wm. A. Tremayne. Cast: Van Dyke Brooke, Norma Talmadge, Antonio Moreno, Garry McGarry, Constance Talmadge, Maurice Costello. A copy of this film is located at the Museum of Modern Art in New York (35mm viewing copy and negative. Both show focus breathing printed in from the source nitrate)

Review from Moving Picture World, October 31, 1914

THE PEACEMAKER (Vitagraph), Oct. 14.-A comedy picture which does not contain a great deal of forcefulness, but which, nevertheless, is very interesting, from the fact that it is well played in a natural sort of a way by Van Dyke Brooke, "The Peacemaker," Antonio Moreno, Norma Talmadge, Garry McGarry and Constance Talmadge. There is much beautiful garden scenery shown which has been splendidly photographed. This is a fine, pleasing release.


Goodbye Summer

Released October 17, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Mrs. Owen Bronson. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Antonio Moreno, Van Dyke Brooke, Bobby Connelly, Paur Scardon, Rex Ingram (bit). 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, November 7, 1914

GOODBYE SUMMER (Vitagraph), Oct. 24.-A two-part feature, which is very artistically produced by a cast made up of Norma Talmadge, Antonio Moreno, Paul Scardon, Van Dyke Brooke, little Bobbie Connelly and others. Mrs. Owen Bronson is the author, who has used a theme which, while not new, is cleverly constructed. Miss Talmadge does some clever emotional work very convincingly. Some beautiful exterior scenes are used as backgrounds that have been artistically photographed. Comparatively speaking, it is an average release.


Under False Colors

Released October 17, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Jane Lennox. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Antonio Moreno, Van Dyke Brooke, Edwin Robbins, Ethel Cozzens.

Review from Moving Picture World, November 7, 1914

UNDER FALSE COLORS (Vitagraph), Oct. 21.-A farce comedy picture which is splendidly acted by Norma Talmadge, Van Dyke Brooke, Antonio Moreno, Edwina Robbins and Ethel Cozzens. The scenes are laid at Fort Henry and there is a military flavor throughout. The plot embraces complications that are not only interesting but laughable. The termination is most satisfactory and the demonstrations from those in the audience indicated that this picture was thoroughly enjoyed. The author is Jane Lennox.


The Curing of Myra May

Released November 21, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke (?). Author: A.M. Judge. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Donald Hall, Van Dyke Brooke. 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, Dec. 12, 1914

THE CURING OF MYRA MAY (Vitagraph), Nov. 27.-Norma Talmadge gives quite a good illustration of an addle-pated young miss of fourteen, who has romantic ideas, exaggerated by reading love stories. It is all very amusing, particularly where her mother discovers her in a long gown, talking to a man and takes the kinks out of her, sending Myra May back to short dresses and shooing away the man. It is a very amusing comedy and is well acted and produced.


Sunshine and Shadows

Released December 5, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: Mrs. Owen Bronson. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Mr. James. Antonio Moreno, Tommy Harper, Lillian Burns. 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, Dec. 26, 1914

SUNSHINE AND SHADOWS (Vitagraph), Dec. 8.-A special feature in two parts, filled with adventure and anguish, written by Mrs. Owen Bronson and directed by Van Dyke Brooke. Spitefulness on the part of one of the leading characters furnishes the major portion of the incidents in this plot, which at the finale end in a happy reunion, midst sunshine and love. The acting is admirable, particularly on the part of Mr. James and Norma Talmadge. A very entertaining number.


A Question of Clothes

Released December 12, 1914. Vitagraph. Director: Van Dyke Brooke. Author: W.A. Tremayne. Cast: Norma Talmadge, Garry McGarry. 2 reels.

Review from Moving Picture World, January 2, 1915

A QUESTION OF CLOTHES (Vitagraph), Dec. 17.-Transposed from a woman to a man, with the lone assistance of a man's wig, a young lady succeeds in deceiving family, friends, neighbors and strangers, including the man who really loves her. W.A. Tremayne is the author and Van Dyke Brooke has evidently did the best he could to make it reasonable. The cast is made up of the best Vitagraph talent, who do justice to their parts, and Norma Talmadge, in the leading role, deserves sympathy in endeavoring to fulfill an unwelcome task.





Back to Norma Talmadge Filmography
Back to Norma Talmadge Home

Last revised, November 2, 2011

Special contents 2008, by Greta de Groat, at gdegroat@stanford.edu . All Rights Reserved