Vera Gribanova

Introduction to Minimalist Syntax, Spring 2011. Natalia Silveira's exposition of Backward Control, Polinsky and Potsdam 2002.
2014-2015: Sabbatical

2013-2014:
Spring:
Seminar on Morphological Theories (graduate, with Paul Kiparsky)
Crosslinguistic Syntax (undergraduate)

2012-2013:
Fall:
Foundations of Syntactic Theory I (graduate)
Linguistic Field Methods: Kazakh (graduate, with Rob Podesva)

Winter:
Linguistic Field Methods: Kazakh (graduate, with Rob Podesva)
Foundations of Syntactic Theory II (graduate, with Tom Wasow)

Spring: Introduction to Minimalist Syntax (graduate)

2011-2012:
Fall: Foundations of Syntactic Theory I (graduate)

Winter:
The Syntax-Phonology Interface (graduate)
Undergraduate Research Seminar

Spring: Crosslinguistic Syntax (undergraduate)

2010-2011:
Winter: Seminar on Morphological Theories (graduate, with Paul Kiparsky)
This course investigates the theoretical and empirical consequences of two classes of morphosyntactic theories --- broadly construed, Lexicalism and Distributed Morphology. Our goal is to dissect the assumptions behind these approaches and to investigate, using a number of case studies, the fine-grained predictions made by each kind of theory for complex linguistic data, including putative prosodic second-place effects, blocking phenomena, affix ordering, and locality effects in allomorphic selection. For each case study, we focus on understanding what combination of assumptions and theoretical devices are required for a satisfactory account to hold within each class of theory.

Spring:
Heritage Languages (undergraduate)
Introduction to Minimalist Syntax (graduate)