1731

 

 

Jan 13

THURSDAY, Jan. 14.

[...]

Last night his R. Highness the Prince had a private Ball

for a particular sett of Quality, at Mr. Heydegger’s in the

Hay-market.  P.  A Ball at the Theatre in the Hay-market,

for the entertainment of divers Persons of Quality and

Distinction, which held till 5 this morning.  LE.[1]

 

 

 

Jan 14

LONDON.

On Thursday last in the Evening, at the

Academy of Vocal and Instrumental Musick, (Mr.

Gates, Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal

being Director for the Night, and a numerous

Assembly of Nobility and Gentry being present)

were performed, with universal Applause, the

following Compositions:

1. A Madrigal for 5 Voices, by Abbot Stefani,

late President of the Academy.

2. A Piece of Vocal and Instrumental Musick,

by Sig. Faux, Chapel Master to the Emperor.

3. A Madrigal for 5 Voices, by Sig. Antonio

Lotti, Chapel Master to the Doge of Venice.

4. Mr. Handell’s Great Te Deum and Jubilate.[2]

 

 

 

Feb 4

FRIDAY, Feb. 5.

Last night his R. H. the Prince had a private Ball at

Mr. Heydegger’s house in the Hay-market, for a particular

set of Quality.  P.[3]

 

 

 

Feb 18

The Royal Academy of Musick have discharged several noted

Hands from their Service, and voted in Mr. Gethin, one of the

Gentlemen in his Majesty’s Band of Musick.

The Musick that was performed at St. Paul’s for the Peace of

Utrecht, composed by Mr. Handel, is to be performed before the

Sons of the Clergy at St. Paul’s.[4]

 

 

 

Feb 22

AT Mr. HICKFORD’S Great Room in

Panton-street near the Hay-market, on Friday next, being

the 26th Day of February, Mr. CASTRUCCI, first Violin to

the Opera, will have a compleat Entertainment of Vocal and

Instrumental MUSICK; with several Concerto’s of his own

Composition, particularly a Sola [sic], in which he will perform 24 Notes

with one Bow; and the 1st and 8th Concerto of his Master the

famous Corelli.[5]

 

 

 

Feb 23

We hear that very shortly there will be a

compleat Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Musick

for the Benefit of the last Violin of Goodmans-

Fields Play-House, in which he will perform several

Concerto’s of his own Composition, and particularly

one Solo, in which he will execute five

and twenty Notes with one Bow: This is esteem’d

the more extraordinary, because it is one Note

more than the Famous first Violin of the Opera

can play.[6]

 

 

 

Feb 23

Last Night their Majesties, the Princesses

Royal and Carolina went to the Opera House

in the Haymarket, and saw the Opera of

Porus.[7]

 

 

 

Feb 23

Yesterday there was a Rehearsal at St.

Paul’s, of the Musick that will be performed

on Thursday before the Sons of the Clergy,

at their annual Meeting, at which there was

a great Appearance of Persons of the first

Rank and Figure; and their Collection on

that Occasion amounted to above 200 l.[8]

 

 

 

Feb 24

THE ANNUAL FEAST of the SONS of the CLERGY

will be held at Merchant-Taylor’s-Hall in

Threadneedle-Street, To-morrow the 25th Inst.

TICKETS may be had at the Chapter and Child’s

Coffee-Houses in St. Paul’s Church-Yard; Tom’s

Coffee-House in Covent-Garden; Rainbow and Richard’s

Coffee-Houses at Temple-Bar; Batson’s Coffee-House in

Cornhill; Oliver’s Coffee-House at Westminster-Hall-Gate;

Sussex Coffee-House in Fleet-Street; and Wigan’s

Coffee-House in King-Street by Guildhall.

N. B. Stewards are provided for the Year ensuing.

Mr. HANDELL’s Te Deum and Jubilate, together

with TWO of his Anthems, will be Vocally and

Instrumentally perform’d at Divine Service; and those

that bring Feast Tickets will be admitted into the

Choir.[9]

 

 

 

Feb 24

Yesterday were rehearsed at St. Paul’s, for the Festival of

the Sons of the Clergy, which is to be celebrated To-morrow,

the Great Te Deum and Jubilate, composed by Mr. Handel

for the publick Thanksgiving upon the Peace of Utrecht,

together with the two Anthems made by him for the Coronation

of his present Majesty: As they are esteemed by all good

Judges some of the grandest Compositions in Church Musick,

and were perform’d by a much greater Number of Voices and

Instruments than usual upon the like Occasion, so there was

a nobler Audience, and a more generous Contribution to the

Charity, than has been known, the Collection amounting to

203 l. 9 s. 7 d. which is very near double what has been given

in any other Year.

 

[Craftsman:] On Thursday at the Feast, at Merchant Taylors Hall,

the Collection amounted to 476 1.[10]

 

 

 

Feb 25

The same Day being the Annual Meeting

of the Sons of the Clergy at the Cathedral

Church of St. Paul’s, an excellent Sermon

was preach’d by the Reverend Mr. Spateman

suitable to the Occasion; when Mr.

Handel’s Te Deum and Jubilate, together

with two of his Anthems, were performed

both vocally and instrumentally, before a

numerous and crowded Congregation.

Afterwards they proceeded to Merchant

Taylor’s Hall, where a fine Entertainment was

provided, at which were present many of

the Right Reverend the Lords Bishops and

Clergy, with several Persons of Distinction;

when we hear the Collection of the Bason

on this Occasion, towards the usual Charity,

amounted to much more than the last Year.[11]

 

 

Thursday was held the annual Feast of the Sons of the Clergy,

when Mr. Handel’s Te Deum and Jubilate, composed for the

Publick Thanksgiving upon the Peace of Utrecht; together with the

two Anthems made by him for the Coronation of his present Majesty,

were perform’d before them at St. Paul’s Cathedral.  The Collection

made then and at the Rehearsal last Tuesday amounted to upwards

of 700 l.[12]

 

 

 

Mar 5

[Viscount Percival’s Diary, Friday 5 March 1730-31]

 

This evening I revived my winter concert.  The performers

were Mr. Needler, Mr. Mellan, Mr. Withrington, Mr. Mercer, and

Mr. Vernor on the fiddle, Mr. Dobson, Mr. Pain on the bass-viol,

Mr. Fabry and Mr. ————— on the harpsichord.

The company were the Earl of Grantham, Earl of Shaftesbury,

Lord Howard of Effingham, Sir John Evelyn, Mr. Hill, Mr. Walker,

brother Parker, Mr. Tripland, Mr. Greenvil, Mr. Le Grand, Mr. Clerk,

Countess of Torrington, Lady Frances Nassau, and her sister,

Lady Anne —————, sister Percival, cousin Le Grand and

cousin Betty Southwell, Lady Ranelagh, Lady Humphreys and

her daughter, Mrs. Donellan, Mrs. Minshull.[13]

 

 

 

Mar 7

Last Night their Majesties, his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the three eldest Princesses, were at the Kings Theatre in the Haymarket and saw the Opera of Sosarmes.[14]

 

 

 

Mar 14

Last Night their Majesties, his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the three eldest Princesses, were at the King’s Theatre in the Haymarket, and saw the Opera of Sosarmes.[15]

 

 

 

Apr 8

[Viscount Percival’s Diary, Thursday 8 April 1731]

 

I returned home to dinner, and found there my cousin Fortrey,

Mr. Fabry and his wife.[16]

 

 

 

Apr 24

This is to give Notice

To all Shopkeepers and Others,

THat at the Printing-House in Bow Church Yard, Cheapside, London, all manner of Business in Printing, either at the Letter-Press or Rolling-Press, continues to be carried on by THOMAS COBB, who married the Widow of the late Mr. JOHN CLUER, who kept the said Printing House;

            Where Shopkeepers Bills, and Bills of Parcels are curiously engraved on Copper: Also Marks for Tobacconists, Haberdashers of Hats, &c. are engraved on Wood or Copper.

            Labels for Surgeons Chests, Apothecaries, Grocers, &c. may be had there, painted or plain.

            Also Blank Receipts for Taxes, &c. Titles for Hungary-Water, Directions for Dassey’s Elixir, and Spirits of Scurvey-Grass.

            Likewise Club-Orders and Funeral Tickets.

            Feast-Tickets for Gardeners and Florists, are printed there, from a curious new Copper Plate, just Engriv’d, being the best ever yet done.

            All Sorts of Pictures painted or plain, Lottery Pictures for Children, Copy-Book Covers, and a new Round-Hand Copy-Book with the Copies set on the Top of every Leaf for Learners to write underneath.

            *** At the abovesaid Printing-Office may be had all Sorts of Paper for Writing Musick, sold cheaper than at any other Place.

            Likewise Mr. Handel’s Opera’s, and many other Books of Musick, are there Engraved, Printed and Sold.

            [...][17]

 

 

 

Apr 29

[Viscount Percival’s Diary, Thursday 29 April 1731]

 

[...] After dinner I went to the Vocal Music Society.[18]

 

 

 

Apr 30

[Viscount Percival’s Diary, Friday 30 April 1731]

 

I returned home to dinner, and had my concert for the last time

this season.  The performers were Mr. Needler, Mr. Mulso,

Mr. Withrington, my brother Percival, Mr. Payn, Mr. Vernon,

Mr. Bagnal, and the great bass for the instrumental parts, and

Signor Fabri, Signora Bertholdi, Mrs. Demer and my daughter for

the vocal.

The company were Lady Evelyn, Lady Bland, Lady Leusham,

cousin Le Grand, sister Percival, Mrs. Minshull, aunt Whorwood,

Mrs. Schutz, etc., Lord Leusham, Sir John Evelyn and his son,

Mr. Le Grand, Mr. Wesley, Mr. Francis Clerke, etc.[19]

 

 

 

[April 30/] May 11

[Edward Holdsworth in Naples to Charles Jennens]

 

Dear Sr.

I thank God I am now so far recover’d of my indisposition yt I can ramble about with pleasure, but as my leg is still weak, I think ’twou’d be imprudent to venture as yet upon another journey, and therefore we propose to pass the summer here. […]

I am sorry yt I did not bring wth me the Musick wch I had copied for you at Rome, because I might have had an opportunity of forwarding it by some vessel from hence to England; but as I propos’d to make but a short stay here I unfortunately left it lock’d up at Rome.

There is now performing at Bologna an Opera wch ’tis believ’d will be the finest yt ever was heard on an Italian stage; The Performers are Cuzzoni (for out of respect I must name her first) Faustina, Teza, Farinelli, Scalzi, &c. in short all ye best voices in Italy. Several English gentlemen are flock’d thither to hear it; I wish yt curiosity had brought you thither too. […][20]

 

 

 

[May 28/] Jun 8

[John Herbert in Naples to Charles Jennens]

 

Dear Sr

I receiv’d yrs of ye 19th of April last week […] I hope we shall have the honour to see you at Bolognia where we are to go to hear ye finest Opera yt ever was <in> Italy there being the most all the finest voices in Europe to be there viz Cuzzoni, Faustina, Tesi, Fardinelli, & Carestina, we had the 20 of March about 4 in ye morning a terrible shock of an Earthquake which did no damage a[t] this side the Apenins but on ye other it has destroy’d one town belonging to the Emperour namely Foggia & most of ye towns there suffer’d pretty much. Mr Holdsworth finds his legg rather worse than it has been this month or two & he designs to go to Ischia an island about 20 miles of this place where he will take the baths […][21]

 

 

 

Jun 7

At the particular Request of the Gentlemen

of Deptford and Woolwich,

For the BENEFIT of Mr. RAY.

By the Company of COMEDINAS,

AT the Theatre-Royal in Lincoln’s-Inn-

Fields, this present Monday, being the 7th of June,

will be performed, A Comedy, call’d,

The LONDON CUCKOLDS.

[...]

To which will be added,

FLORA; An OPERA

Of TWO ACTS:

[...]

With several ENTERTAINMENTS of DANCING,

[...] And at the End

of the Play the celebrated Water Musick, composed by Mr.

Handel, in which Mons. Poitier will beat the Kettle Drums.

[...] this will be

the last Time of the Company’s acting this Season.[22]

 

 

 

Jun 20

[Barbara Pisani in Vienna to Gio. Giacomo Zamboni, 20 June 1731]

 

I am infinitely indebted to your words and work on my behalf in London {...}, and if at present I were free to move and not engaged at the imperial court, where I must depend for every necessity on the wishes of my master [Charles VI] (from whom I hope shortly to have a most clement decision [concerning my permanence here]), I would have the opportunity to be able to decide.  At present, I have no such opportunity, unless I am released from service, in which case I will be allowed to tell you my thoughts clearly and succinctly, for thus I hold them, both for the duty and for the character they display {...}.  You already know this from what I wrote in reply to one with which Handel favoured me concerning this subject {...}, and I confirm and repeat what I expressed to him.  Please receive, sir, these, my sentiments, in good faith, and give me the opportunity to serve you there.  I will not fail in my duty to respond to you.  Only after some delay did I receive from Riva your courteous letter.[23]

 

 

 

Jun 30

The famous Signor Bonanchini, whom her

Grace the Junior Dutchess of Marlborough

allows 500 l. per Ann. for Life, for his several

fine Performances in Musick that he entertains

her Grace with twice a Week, has obtained

Leave of Absence for some Months to go for

France on his private Affairs.[24]

 

 

 

[Jun 30/] Jul 11

[Edward Holdsworth in Naples to Charles Jennens]

 

Dear Sr.

Since I wrote to you last I have been again very much indispo’d, wch prevented my writing to you for some time. I thank god I am now perfectly recover’d, my unfortunate leg excepted; wch still continues so weak, yt I am not able to stand long upon it […]

The opera at Bologna wch had rais’d people’s expectation very high, and brought a vast concourse of Virtuosi thither from all parts, has succeeded very ill. The book was bad, and the Composition very mean, particularly Cuzzoni’s part, wch put ev’ry body very much out of humour; And may convince you, if you want a proof of it, yt the finest voices in ye world signify nothing without a H- - l [Handel]. […][25]

 

 

 

Aug 24

[Edward Holdsworth in Naples to Charles Jennens]

 

            […] We propose to spend some time in Florence before we leave Italy, and then I will inform my self about Botro’s Harpsicords, and of wt value one of them may be. And if you insist upon my giving my opinion of the sweetness of his instruments, you shall have it. And if the blind organist, whom I suppose you know, shou’d happen to travel into this country, pray desire him to choose some Pictures for you.[26]

 

 

 

Aug 31

[Viscount Percival’s Diary, Tuesday 31 August 1731]

 

[...] The 31, Mr. Botmar came

with Martini, the famous “hautboy,” and dined with me.  We

talked of the brutality and insolence of certain persons to their

superiors, and Botmar told us three instances of it.  Bononcini,

the famous composer, was in the Emperor Joseph’s favour to that

degree that he made him extraordinary presents above his salary,

yet he had the insolence often to refuse to play when he sent to

him for that purpose.  At last the Emperor made him come to

Court, and asked him, “Do you consider it is an Emperor whom

you refuse?”  “Yes,” replied the saucy fellow, “but there are

many sovereign princes, and only one Bononcini.”  This insolent

temper obliged him to leave that Court, and he came in the late

Queen’s time for England, where for a while he reigned supreme

over the commonwealth of music, and with justice for he is a very

great man in all kinds of composition.  At length came the more

famous Hendel from Hanover, a man of the vastest genius and

skill in music that perhaps has lived since Orpheus.  The great

variety of manner in his compositions, whether serious or brisk,

whether for the Church or the stage or the chamber, and that

agreeable mixture of styles that are in his works, that fire and

spirit far surpassing his brother musicians, soon gave him the

preference over Bononcini with the English.  So that after some

years’ struggle to maintain his throne, Bononcini abdicated, and

the present young Duchess of Marlborough took him into her house

with a salary of five hundred pounds a year, a sum no musician

ever had before from any Prince, nor ought to have.  While he was

there, the gentlemen of the King’s Chapel set up their club of vocal [202]

and instrumental music, of which I am a member, and Bononcini

accepted to be one of the principal conductors of it, Bishop

Stephani, formerly known by the name of Abbé Stephan, when

at Hanover, a person most famous for harmonious cantatas of two

voices, being declared our president, though absent.

For two or three years our concert proceeded with great union,

till last year (1730) two accidents fell out that divided us; nevertheless

we still hold on, though, like the fall of the angels in heaven,

the best of our vocal performers went off with Mr. Green, the

humpback, organist of St. Paul’s and the King’s Chapel, the chief

undoubtedly of our English composers now living.

Our first misfortune was the loss of Bishop Stephani, who died

that year, in honour of whom the club resolved not to elect a

president for the future, but to keep that post vacant, as if there

were no man living worthy to supply his place.  This was a resolution

insupportable to Bononcini, who had reason to expect that

honour, and thereupon he cooled very much in his affection to

the club, coming very seldom, but still he continued of us, and

favoured us at times with his compositions, which were generally

fine; at last (I now come to the second accident I spoke of) he

sent us by his friend Mr. Green a composition to be performed,

which one of the club, who is versed in foreign music, acquainted

us was not the work of Bononcini, but of the Emperor’s master

of the chapel, and proved it by showing that very composition

printed several years ago, and dedicated to the Emperor.  The

club were astonished that so great a man as Bononcini should

descend so low as to father another man’s works, and impose

them on us as his own, and mentioning their surprise in public,

Bononcini could not but soon hear of the matter.  He stormed

and maintained the gentlemen had accused him falsely, insisting

that music to be still his own; whereupon it was agreed to write

to Vienna to the composer to know the truth.  In the meantime,

Bononcini withdrew from our Society, and many of it, who are his

professed friends, taking his part, left us also.

Three months ago Bononcini quarrelled with the Duchess, his

protector, on pretence she used him ill.  In return for the handsome

salary she gave him, he used to entertain her with concerts, which

she accepted, not imagining that he would bring her in a bill at

last to pay the performers, some of whom were promised three

guineas a time.  The Duchess, making a demur to paying them,

Bononcini took a distaste, left her, and has formed a scheme to

erect a music meeting at York buildings in opposition to the

Opera.  This is the story of this proud man, who if he had valued

himself less, the world would have esteemed him more.[27]

 

 

 

September

[Count Philip Josef Kinsky in London to Gio. Giacomo Zamboni, {September 1731}]

 

I have received letters saying that Pisani cannot come, since the doctors say that she has pulmonary consumption (p[h]tisie).  Thus Händl will be burned (voilà Mons. Händl flambé), unless he has other letters.[28]

 

 

 

Sep 30

Mr. Heydegger is putting the King’s Theatre in the Hay-market

into order to entertain the said Prince [i.e. the Duke of Lorrain] with Balls and Operas.[29]

 

 

 

Oct 7

[...] The report that was set about Friday last of the Queen’s death was the invention of the Spittlefeild wevers [sic] and the stock jobbers, to fall stock.  I ride out with her Saturday morning, she was very cheerfull and in very good humour, which one can’t be without one is in perfect good health. ...[30]

 

 

 

Nov 16

Last Night their Majesties, with the Princess

Royal and the other two eldest Princesses, went to

the Opera House in the Hay-Market, as did also

his serene Highness the Duke of Lorrain. His

Royal Highness the Prince of Wales being

indispos’d, prevented his coming.[31]

 

 

 

Nov 23

Last Tuesday Night [23 November] their Majesties, his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the Three Eldest Princesses, went to the Opera House in the Hay-Market, and saw an Opera call’d PORUS; at which Performance his Serene Highness the Duke of Lorrain, accompanied by several Persons of Distinction, were present.[32]

 

 

 

Nov 27

AT the KING’s THEATRE in the

HAY-MARKET, this present Saturday, being the 27th

Day of November, will be perform’d, An OPERA, call’d,

PORUS.

PIT and BOXES to be put together, and no Persons to be

admitted without TICKETS, which will be deliver’d

This Day, at the Office in the Hay-Market, at HALF a

GUINEA each.

GALLERY FIVE SHILLINGS.

By HIS MAJESTY’s COMMAND,

No Person whatever to be admitted behind the SCENES.

N. B. The SILVER TICKETS are ready to be deliver’d to

the SUBSCRIBERS, or their Order, on Payment of the

Subscription Money at the Office in the Hay-Market.[33]

 

 

 

Nov 27

NEW MUSICK,

And EDITIONS of MUSICK,

Lately Published,

Compos’d by Mr. HANDEL,

1.  The Whole Opera of Porus in Score[.]

2.  A compleat Set of all his late Opera’s in Score.

3.  The Mask of Acis and Galatea.

4.  Apollo’s Feast, 3 Vols. containing the choicest Songs out

of the late Opera’s.

5.  Twenty-four Overtures for Violins, &c. in 8 Parts: Also

the same Overtures curiously set for the Harpsichord.

6.  Six celebrated Songs for French Horns, &c. in 7 Parts.

7.  Seven Collections of Favourite Opera Aires, collected

from his Opera’s, curiously fitted for a German Flute, Violin,

or Harpsichord, Vol. 1.

6. [sic] The choicest Songs in the Opera’s of Lotharius,

Parthenope, and Porus, for a German Flute, &c. Vol. 2.  Part 1, 2.

7. [sic] A complete Set of all the Opera’s transposed for the

Flute, in Two Vols. 4to.

All printed for and sold by JOHN WALSH, Musick Printer

and Instrument-Maker to his Majesty, at the Harp and

Hautboy in Catherine-street in the Strand.[34]

 

 

 

Dec 7

Last Tuesday Night [7 December] the King and Queen, his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, and the Three Eldest Princesses, went to the Opera House in the Hay-market, and saw the Opera of Admetus.[35]

 



[1] The Grub-street Journal, no. 55, Thursday 21 January 1731, [2].

[2] The Daily Journal, no. 3130, Saturday 16 January 1731, [1]; repr. Lowell Lindgren, “The Three Great Noises ‘Fatal to the Interests of Bononcini,’” The Musical Quarterly 61 (1975), 560-83: 567.

[3] The Grub-street Journal, no. 58, Thursday 11 February 1731, [2].

[4] The London Evening-Post, no. 503, Tuesday 16 – Thursday 18 February 1731, [1].

[5] The Daily Post, no. 3566, Monday 22 February 1731, [1].

[6] The Daily Post, no. 3567, Tuesday 23 February 1731, [1].

[7] The Daily Courant, no. 9167, Wednesday 24 February 1731, [2].

[8] The Daily Courant, no. 9167, Wednesday 24 February 1731, [2]; repr. Deutsch, .

[9] The Daily Journal, no. 3163, Wednesday 24 February 1731, [1].

[10] The Daily Journal, no. 3163, Wednesday 24 February 1731, [1]; repr. (with omissions) The Grub-street Journal, no. 60, Thursday 25 February 1731, [3]; repr. The Country Journal: or, The Craftsman, no. 243, Saturday 27 February 1730-31, [2]; repr. (Craftsman) Deutsch, 271.

[11] The Daily Courant, no. 9169, Friday 26 February 1731, [2].

[12] Read’s Weekly Journal, or, British-Gazetteer, no. 310, Saturday 27 February 1731, [2].

[13] Manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont: Diary of Viscount Percival afterwards First Earl of Egmont.  Vol. I. 1730-1733 (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), 155.

[14] The Daily Advertiser, no. 345, Wednesday 8 March 1731, [1].

[15] The Daily Advertiser, no. 351, Wednesday 15 March 1731, [1].

[16] Manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont: Diary of Viscount Percival afterwards First Earl of Egmont.  Vol. I. 1730-1733 (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), 175.

[17] The London Journal, no. 613, Saturday 24 April 1731, [4].

[18] Manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont: Diary of Viscount Percival afterwards First Earl of Egmont.  Vol. I. 1730-1733 (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), 187.

[19] Manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont: Diary of Viscount Percival afterwards First Earl of Egmont.  Vol. I. 1730-1733 (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), 188.

[20] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 1,” item 4, f. 3r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 87.

[21] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 1,” item 4, f. 1r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 87–88.

[22] The Daily Journal, no. 3251, Monday 7 June 1731, [1].

[23] Lowell Lindgren, “Musicians and Librettists in the Correspondence of Gio. Giacomo Zamboni (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MSS Rawlinson Letters 116-138),” [Royal Musical Association] Research Chronicle 24 (1991), 1-194: 128.

[24] The Daily Courant, no. 9249, Wednesday 30 June 1731, [2]; repr. Lowell Lindgren, “The Three Great Noises ‘Fatal to the Interests of Bononcini,’” The Musical Quarterly 61 (1975), 560-83: 572-73.

[25] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 1,” item 5, f. 1r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 88.

[26] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 1,” item 6, f. 1v; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 88.

[27] Manuscripts of the Earl of Egmont: Diary of Viscount Percival afterwards First Earl of Egmont.  Vol. I. 1730-1733 (London: His Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1920), 201-02; partly repr., Deutsch, 277.

[28] Lowell Lindgren, “Musicians and Librettists in the Correspondence of Gio. Giacomo Zamboni (Oxford, Bodleian Library, MSS Rawlinson Letters 116-138),” [Royal Musical Association] Research Chronicle 24 (1991), 1-194: 132.

[29] The London Evening-Post, no. 598, Tuesday 28 – Thursday 30 September 1731, [1].

[30] Peter Wentworth, London, 7 October 1731: The Wentworth Papers, 1705-1739, ed. by James J. Cartwright (London: Wyman & Sons, 1883), 474.

[31] The Daily Advertiser, no. 247, Wednesday 17 November 1731, [1].

[32] Read’s Weekly Journal, or, British-Gazetteer, no. 349, Saturday 27 November 1731, [4]; Chrissochoidis, 692.

[33] The Daily Journal, no. 3400, Saturday 27 November 1731, [2].

[34] The Daily Journal, no. 3400, Saturday 27 November 1731, [2].

[35] Read’s Weekly Journal, or, British-Gazetteer, no. 351, Saturday 11 December 1731, [3]; Chrissochoidis, 692.