1742

 

 

Jan [1/]12

[Edward Holdsworth in Rome to Charles Jennens]

 

[…] I am much pleas’d that our journey is defer’d till the weather in all probability will be more favourable. And as you are so good to express so much tenderness & concern for my health, I flatter my self that this news will not be unwellcome to you. And ’twill be an additional pleasure to you to know that in this new scheme Musick was my friend. After Mr Pitt had heard 2 or 3 recitals of the Opera, He began to be inclin’d to stay; and tho’ He was sure of finding another at Venice, & perhaps a better, yet he cou’d not bear the thoughts of setting out on a journey in the middle of an Opera, & fasting 8 or 10 days from Musick. I don’t doubt but you will much applaud his tast. The best voice we have here is Conti, who is much applauded; and is I think reckon’d the best Superano now in Italy. Tho’, if I mistake not, He was not esteem’d very much in England. But He may be improv’d; or else you are more nice, & not so easily pleas’d as the Italians. I am sorry to hear yt the chief thing to be remark’d of yr Opera is the expence of it, especially at this time. I wish for your sake that it had prov’d a better entertainment, that you might have had something to amuse you, during Handel’s absence. […]

            […] Notwithstanding I have submitted evr’y thing to you that relates to Philippi, yet I beg you will allow me to put a negative on the motto. I am oblig’d to you for the complement you intend me thereby, but I think ’twou’d be very imodest in me to suffer such to be publish’d. I therefore pray put a stop to it as soon as you receive this. As for my part, I can think of none a propos. Nor do I see and necessity indeed of having any. Mons.r Vaillant I know is so much a Frenchman that he thinks a gentleman cannot appear in publick without a feather in his Cap, but I am such a plain fellow, that I had much rather be without one; at least I wou’d by no means wear such a gaudy one, as I think wou’d give me too much the air of a Coxcomb […]

            Since I rec.vd your letter I have search’d the Shops for ye “Concordantiae Hebraicae” but can find no more than the 2 first vol. of it. I have desir’d the best bookseller in Rome to enquire for it, but he despairs of getting it, tho’ t’was printed here but in the year 1621 […]

            If I should happen to meet with it & the grammer before I leave this place, I will send them with Mr Pitt’s books, as I shall yr Themistocles wch I have in my custom […][1]

 

 

 

Jan 4, Dublin

[Minutes of Mercer’s Hospital]

 

At a meeting of Governors, Jan. 4, 1742.  Present—John

Rochfort, Esq., in the chair; Richd. Baldwin, Esq., John Putland,

Esq., Rev. Dean Owen, Dr. Hutchinson, Archdn. Congreve,

Mr. Stone, Mr. Daunt, Dr. Anderson.

Ordered—That John Rochfort, John Putland, and Richd.

Baldwin, Esqrs., be desired to apply in the name of the Governors

of Mercer’s Hospital, to the Revd. the Dean and Chapter of St.

Patrick’s, Dublin, for their leave that such of the choir as shall be

willing may assist at the Philharmonick Society Performances,

which are principally intended for the benefit of the sd. Hospital.

And to notifie to them that the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church

have been pleased to grant them the same request.[2]

 

 

 

Jan 9, Dublin

By their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s special Command, at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday next, the 13th Day of January (being the second Night of Mr. Handel’s Musical Entertainments by Subscription) will be performed, L’Allegro, il Penseroso, & il Moderato, with several Concertos on the Organ and other Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers (by sending their Subscription Ticket) on Tuesday and Wednesday next, from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.  And no Person can be admitted without a Subscribers Ticket.  Printed Books are sold at the same Place, Price a British Six pence.  To begin at 7 o’clock.[3]

 

 

 

Jan 16, Dublin

By their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s special Command, at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday next, being the 20th Day of January, will be performed, Acis and Galatea; to which will be added, an Ode for St. Cecilia’s Day, written by Mr. Dryden, and newly set to Musick by Mr. Handel, with several Concertos on the Organ and other Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers (by sending their Subscription Ticket) on Tuesday and Wednesday at the said Hall, from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.  And no Person can be admitted without a Subscribers Ticket.  To begin at 7 o’clock.————NB. Gentlemen and Ladies are desired to order their Coaches and Chairs to come down Fishamble-street, which will prevent a great deal of Inconveniency that happened the Night before; and as there is a good convenient Room hired as an Addition to a former Place for the Footmen, it is hoped the Ladies will order them to attend there till called for.—Printed Books are sold at the same Place, Price a British Six pence.[4]

 

 

 

Jan 23, Dublin

By their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s special

Command, at the New Musick-hall . . . on Wednesday next

will be performed, Acis and Galatea; to which will be added an Ode for

St. Cecilia’s Day.[5]

 

 

 

Jan 23, Dublin

[Minutes of Mercer’s Hospital]

 

The Gentlemen deputed by this Board to the Chapter of St Patricks

reported that they had applied to them according to the Order, Janry 4

1741[-42], & receiv’d the following answer. [Deutsch, 536]

The Dean and Chapter of St. Patricks are ready to concur

with the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, in permitting the

Choir to assist at the Musical Performance of the Philharmonick

Society,—if the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church will concur

with them in permitting the Choir to assist at Mr. Handel’s.  They

think that every argument in favour of the one, may be urged with [55]

equal strength at least in favour of the other.  Particularly that

which with them is of greatest weight, the advantage of Mercer’s

Hospital.  Mr. Handel having offer’d, and being still ready, in

return for such a favour, to give the Governors some of his choicest

Musick, and to direct and assist at the performance of it for the

benefit of the hospital, which will in one night raise a considerable

sum for their use, without lessening the annual Contribution of the

Philharmonic Society, or any of their other funds; and in order to

prevent this permission to be brought into a precedent, which some

time or other may be of evil consequence, the Dean and Chapter

of St. Patricks will concur with the Dean and Chapter of Christ

Church, in any proper rule to hinder their voices or other members

of the Choir from performing at any public musical performance

excepting in Churches, without the joint permission of both Deans

and Chapters first had and obtained. [Townsend, 54-55]

The above answer being read and a motion being made that application

be made to the Chapter of Christ Church in persuance to the desire of the

Chapter of St Patricks—is passed in the negative. [Deutsch, 536][6]

 

 

 

Jan 30, Dublin

By their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s special Command, at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday next will be performed, an Oratorio called ESTHER, with Additions, and several Concertos on the Organ and other Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers (by sending their Subscription Ticket) on Tuesday and Wednesday next, at the said Hall, from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.—To begin at 7 o’clock.——Printed Books are sold at the same Place, Price a British Six-pence.——NB.  It is humbly hoped that no Gentlemen or Ladies will take it ill, that none but Subscribers can be admitted, and that no Single Tickets will be delivered, or Money taken at the Door.[7]

 

 

 

Jan 30, Dublin

By the Desire of several Persons of Quality and Distinction, there will be a new Subscription made for Mr. Handel’s Musical Entertainments, for Six Nights more, on the same Footing as the last.  No more than 150 Subscriptions will be taken in, and no single Tickets sold, or any Money taken at the Door.  Subscriptions will be taken in at Mr. Handel’s House in Abby-street [sic], near Lyffey-street, on Monday next, being the 8th Day of February, from 9 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.  The Performances are to continue once a Week, till the 6 Nights are over.

NB.  The Tickets for the last Night of the First Subscription, will be delivered to the Subscribers on Tuesday and Wednesday next, at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon; where Subscriptions are taken in likewise.[8]

 

 

 

Feb 4-8

[Charles Jennens in London to Edward Holdsworth]

 

Dear Sir,

Your last letter cam[e] just time enough to prevent the motto being printed: for I had deliver’d your letters to Mr Vaillant with the motto in the Title-page, that he & Mr Benger the printer might make a calculation of the expenses, & they were return’d to me only for a day or two when your letter arrived very seasonably, upon the receipt of which I struck out the motto, & the next day parted with them finally in order to their being printed. After all, I see no harm in the motto. There is no more imply’d in it than you have expressly understated in the letters themselves, & more than once intimated that you have perform’d what you understood; which had been but modestly limited to the word cogitat.

And as for Motto’s in general, I find that many of our best Authors make use of them. For my own part, I own my self so much a Friend to them, that whenever I scribble to the publick, I cannot resist the Temptation of adorning my Title page with any significant motto that comes into my head & seems a propos: nay, I gave Handel a couple before an Oratorio, one Greek & the other Latin; not to show my acquaintance with the two Languages, but to point out more strongly my own Sentiments express’d in some parts of the Oratorio, & to justify them by two considerable Authoritys from the Heathen Moralists. If any Critick thought me a Coxcomb [1v] for this, ’tis more than I know, or care. If I am to decline my own Sense of things for fear of Censure, I must never attempt to speak or write rationally; for those who do neither will, be sure to find fault. But enough of the Motto. ’Tis struck out, & let it go.

I have receiv’d the Box, in which I find two volumes of Cardinal Thomasius publish’d by Blanchini, which I take to be no part of his Vindiciae. I who buy all Books have no exception to those: but Mr Sandford of Baliol on a view of the first Tome of the Vindiciae, lik’d it so well, that he resolv’d to buy it; & I have given him hopes that you will procure it him, but the other two volumes he does not intend to meddle with. I suppose you may send it among Mr. Pitt’s Goods, if this finds you still at Rome.

[…] Handel’s Friends were very well pleas’d with Conti, but the Favourers of the opposite Opera lik’d neither him nor any other who sung for Handel; & for that very reason, because they sung for Handel. We consider’d him a rising Genius, too young at that time for Perfection, but promising an equality with the first Singers in Europe. And by the account you, as well as others give of him, I find we were not mistaken. [2r]

            [2v…] You have furnish’d me with a motto from Horace I think a very pretty one, & if you had not declar’d against all mottos, I might perhaps have prefer’d it to your Book. But you are so fearful of the Criticks! If I had not been in Fear of a more formidable enemy, I would have given you a specimen of my Courage in facing them, & led up the Van with you most amicably. As it is, I have done what I could: I make no secret of the person the letters were writ to: indeed how should I? For I own I take a pride in the publication of it, & am determin’d that all the world should observe, (I mean all who know anything of me) how punctually I practice my own […] I have therefore made my Printer and Bookbinder so acquainted with it, without any injunction of secrecy […]

            [3r…] Perhaps some will say the Argument is forc’d & unnatural, & censure me as injudicious (or something grosser) for approving it & desiring it might be publish’d: this is nothing; I expect it of course; I have stood this kind of Fire already, & came off unhurt. A little piece I wrote at Mr. Handel’s request to be subjoyn’d to Milton’s Allegro & Penseroso, to which He gave the Name of Il Moderato, & which united those two independent Poems in one Moral Design, met with smart censures from I don’t know who. I overheard one in the Theatre saying it was Moderato indeed, & the Wits at Tom’s Coffee-house honour’d it with the Name of Moderatissimo. But the Opinion of many others, who signify’d their approbation of it in Print as well as in Conversation, together with the account Mr. Handel sends me of it’s Reception in Ireland, have made me ample amends for those random expressions of Contempt, if I wanted any amends; but indeed they make no impression; I satisfy my self with contemning them in my turn, I look upon the whole herd of vulgar Criticks as Servum Pecus, & he who stands in Awe of them is Servus [3v] Servorum (not Dei, but) Deae, of a certain Goddess you are not acquainted with, but may find her with a crowd of Votaries in the Dunciad.

[…] By what I have seen of the Italian Opera’s you sent me, they seem to be of the usual stamp, very defective both in Judgement & Invention, contriv’d without Art, & executed without Spirit; the Harmony thin; the Airs dry & inexpressive, yet capricious; passages frequently repeated, tho’ tiresome at the first hearing; & all this stuff intermix’d with such long tedious Recitative, that I think I could not bear to sit out one of the Italian Operas, or if I did, it must be for Penance, not for Entertainment. I have made so many Trials of their most celebrated pieces, & with such ill success, that I believe I shall never give you any more trouble on that score. The Baron d’ Astorga is so much superior to the Opera-makers, & indeed so good a composer, that I wish I had more of him. I think you said he dealt chiefly in Church-Musick, of which you sent me only the Stabat Mater: the Subject is a melancholy one, but does he never set Thanksgivings? I would fain see his Style in a more chearfull piece of Devotion, & rather in the Vulgate Psalms than in such rhyming Verses as these; to say no more.

 

[4v…]

[postscript:]

I doubt my Letter has tir’d you as much as an Italian Opera would me. By many interruptions it is now Feb. 8.[9]

 

 

 

Feb 6, Dublin

In the Press, and will speedily be Publish’d,

C A second Edition of Original Poems on

Various Subjects serious and diverting, by Laurence

Whyte, to which will be annex’d in the same Volume,

several other Poems moral and entertaining not in

the former Edition, by the same Author, viz.

1st. A Poem on the General Effect and Excellency

of Musick, particularly, on the famous Mr. Handel[’]s

performance, who has been lately invited into this

Kingdom by his Grace the Duke of Devonshire Lord

Lieutenant of Ireland, for the Entertainment of the

Nobility and Gentry, &c. [...][10]

 

 

 

Feb 6, Dublin

By the Desire of several Persons of Quality and Distinction,

there will be a new Subscription made for Mr. Handel’s Musical

Entertainments, for Six Nights more, on the same Footing as the

last.  No more than 150 Subscriptions will be taken in, and no

Single Tickets sold, or any money taken at the door.  Subscriptions

will be taken in at Mr. Handel’s House in Abby street

near Lyffee street, on Monday next, being the 8th Day of

February, from 9 in the Morning, till 3 in the Afternoon.  The

performances are to continue once a week, till the 6 Nights are

over.  N.B. The Tickets for the last Night of the first Subscription,

will be delivered to the Subscribers on Tuesday and Wednesday

next at the New Musick Hall in Fishamble street, from 10 o’clock

in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon, where Subscriptions are

taken in likewise.[11]

 

 

 

Feb 9, Dublin

Whereas several of the Nobility and Gentry have been pleased to desire a second Subscription for Mr. Handel’s Musical Entertainments, on the same Terms as the first; Mr. Handel, being a Stranger, and not knowing where to wait on every Gentleman, who was a Subscriber to his first, to pay his Compliments, hopes that those who have a Mind to subscribe again, will be pleased to send in their Names this Day (being Tuesday the 9th of February) and To-morrow, at the Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, where Attendance will be given from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon, and every following Day at his House in Abby [sic] street near Liffey-street.

NB.  To-morrow being the last Night of Performance of his first Subscription, the Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers this Day and To-morrow at the Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, from 10 o’clock in the Morning till three in the Afternoon; where new Subscriptions are taken in likewise.

It is humbly requested that the Ladies will order their Coaches to come down Fishamble street [sic] every Saturday to the Assembly, as they do so to Mr. Handel’s Entertainment, which will prevent a great many Inconveniences. [...][12]

 

 

 

Feb 9, Dublin

It is humbly requested that the Ladies will order their Coaches

to come down Fishamble-street every Saturday to the Assembly, as

they do to Mr. Handel’s Entertainment, which will prevent a great

many inconveniences.[13]

 

 

 

Feb 16, Dublin

By their Graces the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire’s special

Command, at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday next

will be performed, Alexander’s Feast, with Additions,

and several Concertos on the Organ.  Attendance will be given

this Day at Mr. Handel’s House in Abby-street, and on Monday,

Tuesday, and Wednesday at the Musick-hall in Fi<sham>ble-street,

in order to deliver to the Subscribers their <new Sub>scription Ticket

(by sending the Subscription Money) <in which> Places Subscriptions

are taken in likewise.  None but <> Tickets can be admitted to the

Publick Rehearsals— <NB.  For> the Conveniency of the ready

emptying the H<ouse, no Chairs> [3] will be admitted in waiting but

hazard Chairs at the new Passage in Copper-alley.

[...]

It is humbly requested that the Ladies will order their Coaches

to come down Fishamble-street every Saturday to the Assembly,

as they do to Mr. Handel’s Entertainment, which will prevent a

great many Inconveniencies.[14]

 

 

 

Feb 16, Dublin

For the Benefit of Mr. Barrington, by his Majesty’s Company of Comedians at the Theatre-royal in Aungler-street, on Friday the 19th of February, will be acted a Tragedy called Venice Preserved; or, a Plot Discovered, Belvidera to be performed by Mrs. Cibber.  At the End of the Play Mr. Barrington will Sing his celebrated RORATORIO.[15]

 

 

 

Feb 20, Dublin

At the New Musick-hall, in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday

the 24 Inst. will be performed, Alexander’s Feast, with Additions,

and several Concertos on the Organ.  The Tickets will be

delivered to the Subscribers on Tuesday and Wednesday next,

from 10 o’clock in the Morning till 3 in the Afternoon. ———

NB. For the Conveniency of the ready emptying the House, no

Chairs will be admitted in waiting but hazard Chairs at the new

Passage in Copper-alley.[16]

 

 

 

Feb 23, Dublin

Several Derbyshire Gentlemen having deposited a Guinea each,

in order to their dining together, afterwards agreed to give the Money

to Mercer’s Hospital, and it was accordingly last Week paid to John

 Putland, Esq;-Treasurer of the said Hospital.

One of Mr. Handel’s Principal Singers having fallen Sick,

Alexander’s Feast, that was to have been performed to Morrow

is put off till Tuesday next being the second of March.[17]

 

 

 

Feb 27, Dublin

At the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Tuesday next

will be performed, Alexander’s Feast, with Additions, and

Concertos on the Organ.  The Tickets will be delivered to the

Subscribers on Monday and Tuesday next, from 10 o’clock in the

Morning till 3 in the Afternoon. ——— For the Conveniency of the

ready emptying the House, no Chairs will be admitted in waiting

but hazard Chairs at the new Passage in Copper-alley.

NB. The Gentlemen of the Charitable Society on College-green,

at the Request of Mr. Handel, have put off their weekly

Concert until Tuesday the 9th of March.

[...]

At the particular desire of several Persons of Quality, for the Benefit of

Monsieur de Rheiner, a distress’d foreign Gentleman, at the Theatre in

Smock-Alley, on Thursday the fourth of March, will be acted a Comedy

call’d, The Constant Couple; or, A Trip to the Jubilee, the Part of Sir

Harry Wildair, to be attempted by Monsieur de Rheiner. — N. B. Monsieur

de Rheiner has been oblig’d to put off his Day, which was to have been on

Tuesday next, on account of all the best Musick being engaged to Mr. Handel’s

Concert; and as he was oblig’d to give a considerable Praemium to obtain

another Day, besides other extraordinary Expences, he humbly hopes that

no Person will desire Admittance for less than full Prices during the whole

Performance. [...][18]

 

 

 

February

A

POEM

ON

The general Effect and Excellency of MUSICK, but now more particularly on the famous Mr. HANDEL’s Performance, and Compositions, who has been lately invited into this Kingdom, by his Grace the DUKE of DEVONSHIRE, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.

[line]

 

Hoc est cur cantet vinctus quoque Compede Fossor,

Indocili Numero cum grave mollit Opus.

Cantet et initens limosae pronus Arenae,

Adverso tardam qui trahit Amne ratem,

Quique refert pariter lentos ad Pectora Remos,

In Numerum pulsâ Brachia versat Aqua.

Fessus ut incubuit Baculo, Saxove resedit

Pastor; Arundineo Carmine mulcet Oves.

Cantantis pariter, pariter data Pensa trahentis

Fallitur Ancillae dicipiturque Labor.

Fertur et abducta Lyrneside tristis Achilles

Haemoniâ curas attenuasse Lyrâ.

Cum traheret Sylvas Orpheus et dura canendo

Saxa, bis amissa Conjuge moestus erat.

OVID. Lib. 4. Eleg. 1. de Trist.

———Nihil hic nisi Carmina desunt.  VIRG. Ecl. 8.

 

SHALL Irish Bards be silent at this time?

Or can the Irish Harp forbear to chime?

Peruse, ye Bards, the Volumes on you[r] Shelves!

Invoke the Muses, and divert yourselves, [2]

Neptune surrounds you with his foaming Billows,

Bids you to waken from your downy Pillows,

When at the Helm great Devonshire presides,

And blest Hibernia safe at Anchor rides,

Enjoying all the Plenty she can wish,

And most indulg’d when rul’d by Cavendish;

Who has her Welfare, as his own at Heart,

And gives her Pledges from a tender Part,

Part of himself has he vouchsaf’d to give,

On Irish Soil to flourish, and to live;

The lovely Branch he gives to Beshrough’s Heir,

To cherish and enjoy the noblest Fair;

Both thus united shall with Fruit abound,

And spread their Branches over Irish Ground.

May all their Days be happy and serene,

And may their Race new Honours still obtain.

Our Isle’s from Famine and Contagion free,

What now remains but Song and Harmony,

But Devonshire, to make it more compleat,

Has brought us Handel in his Science great,

Grand in his Aspect, Faculties, and Skill,

With Compositions flowing from his Quill,

He charms the World, which still cries out for more

Expected from his unexhausted Store,

He from few * Notes can various Strains compose,

With such harmonious Concords they perclose,

That even Discords shall amuse the Ear,

And by surprising Thoughts are brought to bear,

When such a Hand as our Duburgh shall swell,

A single Note, like Lover’s last farewel [sic];

And then transport us with some sudden Flight,

Which entertains his Audience with Delight,

Some Barrs [sic] we see, whose Notes but three or four,

By graceful Touches mounted to a Score;

With all the Fuges and Fancies,—in a Word,

Which that celestial Science can afford. [3]

When Orpheus wrote the argonautick Tale,

He, but his Harp, on Mountains cou’d prevail,

To dance and follow, as the Bards relate,

By giving Life to Things inanimate,

’Twas by his Harp and Musick’s powerful Spell,

That he releas’d Euridice from Hell,

’Tis nothing strange that Animals admire

The Sound of Musick on the Lute and Lyre,

The Insect Bee pursues the Noise of Brass,

And ev’ry Brute admires it but the Ass,

The learn’d alone can hear it in the Spheres,

And all Mankind admire it, that have Ears,

Dolphins to hear it follow Ships and Boats,

And Birds by Nature warble out their Notes,

(|) Arion’s Harp made Dolphins waft him o’er,

Safe from the Latian to the Lesbian Shore,

The winged Choirs, melodious ev’ry where,

Their various Notes in Symphonies compare,

The Trumpet’s sound shall animate the Steed,

And make the Coward fight in time of Need,

Take Arms with Courage in his Countries Cause,

Or bravely die, or come off with Applause.

With double Vigour Hero’s stand their Ground,

Despising Danger, at the Trumpet’s Sound,

March on to Battle, at the Beat of Drum,

To face their Foes, tho’ sure to meet their Doom.

Gaffer, with Geehup, drives the Cart or Plow,

When Gammer sings, she spins, or milks her Cow.

The Nurse by Musick lulls her Babe to rest,

In Heaven it is the Practice of the blest.

Whilst they sing Hymns to great Jehovah’s Name,

And all his Works in Anthems they proclaim,

When Saul, with evil Spirit was possest,

The royal Psalmist drove it from his Breast,

Such were the Powers of his Harp and Lays,

When both were tun’d to his Creator’s Praise, [sic] [4]

Our German Orpheus now surpasses Greece,

In ev’ry tuneful Opera and Piece;

Which he performs with wonderful Command,

By Motions not unlike the slight of Hand;

His Works, as precious Patterns, long shall last,

That future Ages may attempt his Taste:

If by Industry, Time shou’d raise again

Another Handel with his happy Vein:

Hibernia’s Sons, his Strains must now admire,

Who are true Lovers of their antient Lyre,

Their Country’s Arms, a Type by Heaven’s Decree,

Of Concord, Plenty, Peace and Liberty.

When at the Organ, or the trembling * Wire,

Both Hands employ’d, and more it might require,

In different Parts, and diff’rent Spheres they move,

And both conduce to Harmony and Love,

His Fingers fly with universal sway,

Whilst Hundreds stand amaz’d to hear him play

No Key can pass untouch’d, or idle stand,

And ev’ry Note is humble to his Hand;

These are his Subjects, he their lawful Prince,

Triumphant rides them, but gives no offence,

If pedal Bases grumble for their King,

The Trebles warble like the Birds in Spring,

Thus he employs his Hands, and eke his Feet,

In Time and Measure, and in Movements sweet;

In each Degree such Melody they make,

Yet at his Touch they tremble and they shake,

Both high and low obedient at his call,

And by his Influence they shall rise or fall;

’Twixt both extreams the Tenor comes in slow,

As Mediator ’twixt the high and low.

To him sometimes, great Revenues they bring

Without a Tax, unless it be to sing,

Or exercis’d an Hour or two at Play,

And then to rest ’till next succeeding Day. [5]

Since Caesar’s Vice Roy thus he entertains,

And Nobles hear his elevating Strains,

Apollo and the Muses give their Votes,

To chuse him Prince of Harmony and Notes.

Soft Musick with surprising Intervals

Nor cloys the Ear, nor Fancy ever palls;

The swift Allegro, and Adagio grave,

Both in their kind such Excellencies have,

This soft and sweet, melodiously complains,

That sings, and rants, with loud and lofty Strains,

The one all Life, with little Thoughts of care,

The other walks with solemn serious Air.

What sweet Recess from Cares, and Toils of Day,

It is to hear a Band in Consort play?

The noblest Passions here are mov’d so strong,

No Mortal can resist the Power of Song.

The Iliad made the Son of Phillip great,

And fir’d the Youth to ev’ry martial Feat,

Perform’d by antient Hero’s brave and bold,

In Trojan Wars, and Grecian Story told.

When on the Lute Amphion sweetly play’d,

For Theban Walls the first Foundation laid,

At which the savage Nation was surpriz’d,

Obey’d his Laws, grew tame and civiliz’d.

 

COROLLARIES.

Hence sprung great Cities, Commonwealths and Kings,

Hence sprung our Knowledge of celestial Things;

Hence sprung Mechanics, Sciences and Arts,

Hence sprung Philosophy with all it’s Parts.

From Musick’s Charms all Happiness we draw,

Our Peace and Concord, Liberty and Law;

’Tis by it’s Charms most chearfully we pray,

Without it there’s no Merriment or Play,

And Bards without it, nothing more cou’d say. [6]

 

CONCLUSION.

Thus Devonshire, our Sorrows to allay,

Invites the Nation to hear Handel play;

Soon as his Grace appear’d on Irish Ground;

Our two Year’s Famine were in Lethe drown’d;

Contagions fly, and Plenty crowns the Field;

No more shall Lands lie barren and untill’d:

Since for our Wants his Grace was heard to moan,

In recommending Tillage from the Throne.

Long may he rule, to prop this sinking Isle,

And all her Foes to Reason reconcile,

Give Trade that Freedom formerly enjoy’d

That all industrious Hands may be imploy’d

This Blessing, cou’d Hybernia once obtain,

No more shou’d any murmur or complain.[19]

 

 

 

Mar 4

[Horace Walpole to Horace Mann]

 

London, March 3d, 1742.

 

[... 353 ... 355 ...]

Thursday evening.

[... 356 ... 358 ...]

We have got another opera, which is liked: there was to have

been a vast elephant, but the just directors designing to give the

audience the full weight of one for their money, made it so heavy that

at the prova it broke through the stage.  It was to have carried twenty

soldiers with Monticelli on a throne in the middle.  There is a new

subscription begun for next year, thirty subscribers at two hundred

pounds each.  Would you believe that I am one? — you need not

believe it quite, for I am but half an one; Mr Conway and I take a share

between us.  We keep Monticelli and Amorevoli, and to please Lord

Middlesex, that odious Muscovita, but shall discard Mr Vaneschi.  We

are to have the Barberina and the two Faussans; so at least the singers

and dancers will be equal to anything in Europe.

[... 359 ...] Your sister is with mine at the Park; they came to town

last Tuesday for the opera and returned next day.  After supper, I

prevailed on your sister to sing, and though I had heard her before,

I thought I never heard anything beyond it.  There is a sweetness in

her voice equal to Cuzzoni’s, with a better manner.[20]

 

 

 

Mar 4, Dublin

[Minutes of Mercer’s Hospital]

 

At a meeting of Governors, March 4, 1742.  Present:—John

Putland, Esq.; Mr. Baldwin, Dean Owen, Dean Hutchinson,

Dean Maturine.

Whereas Mr. Putland reported from a Committee appointed

to consider of a Performance designed for the benefit of this

Hospital, the Infirmary, and the Prisoners of the Marshalseas, That

it was the desire of the Gentlemen of that Committee, that a

Deputation from the Trustees for those several Charities should

Attend the Deans and Chapters of Christ Church and St. Patrick, to

desire their leave that the Choir of both Cathedrals may assist at

the said Performance.

Ordered—That the Trustees of this Hospital do concur with

the Committee provided that the whole Benefit of the said

Performance, and of all Rehearsals previous to it, shall be entirely

applied to the Support of the said Charities, and that Tickets be

given out for whatever Rehearsals shall be necessary, at such prices

as shall be thought most convenient by the Trustees of said Charities.[21]

 

 

 

Mar 6, Dublin

The new Serenata called HYMEN, that was to have been

performed on Wednesday next, at Mr. Handel’s Musical

Entertainments at the New Musick-Hall in Fishamble-street, is by the

sudden Illness of Mrs. Cibber, put off to the Wednesday following;

and as many of Mr. Handel’s Subscribers are obliged to go

out of Town soon, it is humbly, hoped that they will accept of

the Allegro ed il Penseroso for the next Night’s Performance,

which will be on Wednesday the 10th of March.—Tickets will

be delivered to the Subscribers on Tuesday and Wednesday next,

at the Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, from 10 o’clock in the

Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.[22]

 

 

 

Mar 9, Dublin

Several Gentlemen and Ladies Subscribers to Mr. Handel’s

Musical En<t>ertainments having desired that the Musical

Performance should be put off till Wednesday se’night the 17th of

March, Mrs. Cibber being in a fair Way of Recovery.  The new

Serenata called Hymen, will be certainly performed on that Day.[23]

 

 

 

Mar 13, Dublin

At the new Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday

next, being the 17th of March, will be performed a new Serenata

called HYMEN.  With Concertos on the Organ and other

Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers on

Tuesday and Wednesday next, from 10 o’clock in the Morning

till 3 in the Afternoon.[24]

 

 

 

Mar 16, Dublin

At the new Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, To-morrow,

being Wednesday the 17th of March, will be performed L’ Allegro

ed il Penseroso, with Concertos on the Organ; Mrs. Cibber

continuing so ill that the new Serenata called HYMEN cannot be

performed on that Day.  The Tickets will be delivered to the

Subscribers this Day and To-morrow, from 10 o’clock in the

Morning till 3 in the Afternoon.[25]

 

 

 

Mar 20, Dublin

At the new Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday

next, being the 24th of March, will be performed a new Serenata

called HYMEN, with Concertos on the Organ and other

Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers on

Tuesday and Wednesday next, from 10 o’clock in the Morning

till 3 in the Afternoon.[26]

 

 

 

Mar 20, Dublin

For the benefit of Signora Avolio at the Musick-Hall in Fishamble-street, on Tuesday the 6th of April, will be a Concert of Vocal and Instrumental Musick.  As Signora Avolio is a Stranger in this Country, she most humbly hopes, that the Nobility and Gentry, whom she hath had the Honour of performing before, will be pleased to honour her benefit with their Presence, which she will acknowledge in the most grateful Manner.  Tickets to be had at her Lodgings at Mr. Madden’s in Strand-street, and the Printer’s hereof, at a British Crown each.[27]

 

 

 

Mar 23

[4th Earl of Radnor in Twitenham to James Harris, 23 March 1742]

 

            Charles Jennings and I whent last Friday for the 2nd time to Alexanders Feast[,] which was performed a little better then before[;] I think upon the whole Arn is the best (even alowing his thefts from Handel) of the young composers.[28]

 

 

 

Mar 27, Dublin

At the new Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, on Wednesday

next, being the 31st of March, will be presented a new Serenata

called HYMEN, with Concertos on the Organ and other

Instruments.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers on

Tuesday and Wednesday next, from 10 o’Clock in the Morning

till 3 in the Afternoon.

For Relief of the Prisoners in the several Goals, and for the

Support of Mercer’s Hospital in Stephen’s Street, and of the

Charitable Infirmary on the Inns Quay, on Monday the 12th of April,

will be performed at the Musick Hall in Fishamble Street, Mr.

Handel’s new Grand Oratorio, call’d the MESSIAH, in which

the Gentlemen of the Choirs of both Cathedrals will assist, with

some Concertoes on the Organ, by Mr. Handell.  Tickets to be

had at the Musick Hall, and at Mr. Neal’s in Christ-Church-

Yard, at half a Guinea each.  N. B. No Person will be admitted

to the Rehearsal without a Rehearsal Ticket, which will be given

gratis with the Ticket for the Performance when pay’d for.[29]

 

 

 

Mar 27, Dublin

For Relief of the Prisoners in the several Goals [sic], and for the Support of Mercer’s Hospital in Stephen’s Street, and of the Charitable Infirmary on the Inns Quay, on Monday the 12th of April, will be performed at the Musick Hall in Fishamble Street, Mr. Handel’s new Grand Oratorio, call’d the MESSIAH, in which the Gentlemen of the Choirs of both Cathedrals will assist, with some Concertoes [sic] on the Organ, by Mr. Handell.  Tickets to be had at the Musick Hall, and at Mr. Neal’s in Christ-Church-Yard, at half a Guinea each.  N. B. No Person will be admitted to the Rehearsal without a Rehearsal Ticket, which will be given gratis with the Ticket for the Performance when pay’d for.[30]

 

 

 

Apr 3, Dublin

At the new Musick Hall in Fishamble-street on Wednesday next, being the 7th of April, will be performed an Oratorio call’d ESTHER, with Concertos on the Organ, being the last Time of Mr. Handel’s Subscription Performance.  The Tickets will be delivered to the Subscribers on Tuesday next at Mr. Handel’s House in Abby-street, from Ten o’clock in the Morning till the Time of Performance.

On Thursday next being the 8th Inst. at the Musick Hall in Fishamble-street, will be the Rehearsal of Mr. Handel’s new Grand Sacred Oratorio called The MESSIAH, in which the Gentlemen of both Choirs will assist: With some Concertos on the Organ by Mr. Handel.  The Doors will be opened at Eleven, and no Person to be admitted without a Rehearsal Ticket, which is given Gratis with the Tickets for the Performance, when paid for.——Tickets to be had at the Musick Hall, and at Mr. Neal’s in Christ-church-yard, at Half a Guinea each.[31]

 

 

 

Apr 9, Dublin

Yesterday Mr. Handell’s new Grand Sacred Oratorio, called, The MESSIAH, was rehearsed at the Musick-Hall in Fishamble Street, to a most Grand, Polite and crouded [sic] Audience; and was performed so well, that it gave universal Satisfaction to all present; and was allowed by the greatest Judges to be the finest Composition of Musick that ever was heard, and the sacred Words as properly adapted for the Occasion.

N.B.  At the Desire of several Persons of Distinction, the above Performance is put off to Tuesday next[.]  The Doors will be opened at Eleven, and the Performance begin at Twelve.

Many Ladies and Gentlemen who are well-wishers to this Noble and Grand Charity for which this Oratorio was composed, request it as a Favour, that the Ladies who honour this Performance with their Presence would be pleased to come without Hoops, as it will greatly encrease the Charity, by making Room for more Company.[32]

 

 

 

Apr 12

The Trustees of the Publick Infirmary in James-Street, Westminster, have lately receiv’d a Benefaction of 50 l. from Charles Jennens, of Gopsall in Leicestershire, Esq; and 20 l. from a Lady unknown, for both which Sums they thus publickly return their grateful Acknowledgment.[33]

 

 

 

Apr 13, Dublin

This day will be performed Mr. Handell’s new Grand Sacred [88]

Oratorio, called the MESSIAH.  The doors will be opened at Eleven,

and the performance begin at Twelve.

The Stewards of the Charitable Musical Society request the

Favour of the ladies not to come with hoops this day to the Musick

Hall in Fishamble Street.  The Gentlemen are desired to come

without their swords.[34]

 

 

 

This Day will be performed Mr. Handell’s new Grand Sacred Oratorio,

called The MESSIAH.  The Doors will be opened at Eleven, and the Performance begin at Twelve.

This being Passion-Week, Mrs. Hambleton and Mrs. Walter’s Assembly is put off to the

Saturday following.[35]

 

 

 

Apr 13, Dublin

On Tuesday last Mr. Handel’s Sacred Grand Oratorio, the MESSIAH, was performed in the New Musick-Hall in Fishamble-street; the best Judges allowed it to be the most finished piece of Musick.  Words are wanting to express the exquisite Delight it afforded to the admiring crouded [sic] Audience.  The Sublime, the Grand, and the Tender, adapted to the most elevated, majestick and moving Words, conspired to transport and charm the ravished Heart and Ear.  It is but Justice to Mr. Handel, that the World should know, he generously gave the Money arising from this Grand Performance, to be equally shared by the Society for relieving Prisoners, the Charitable Infirmary, and Mercer[’]s Hospital, for which they will for ever gratefully remember his Name; and that the Gentlemen of the two Choirs, Mr. Dubourg, Mrs. Avolio, and Mrs. Cibber, who all performed their Parts to Admiration, acted also on the same disinterested Principle, satisfied with the deserved Applause of the Publick, and the conscious Pleasure of promoting such useful, and extensive Charity.  There were above 700 People in the Room, and the Sum collected for that Noble and Pious Charity amounted to about 400l. out of which 127l. goes to each of the three great and pious Charities.[36]

 

 

 

Apr 15

[Horace Walpole to Horace Mann]

 

April 15, 1742.

 

[... 397 ... 398 ...]

Here!  Amorevoli has sent me another letter.  Would you believe

that our wise directors for next year will not keep the Visconti, and

have sent for the Fumagalli?  She will not be heard to the first row

of the pit.[37]

 

 

 

Apr 20, Dublin

On Mr. Handel’s performance of his Oratorio, call’d the

Messiah, for the Support of Hospitals and other pious Uses, at the

Musick Hall in Fishamble-street, on Tuesday, April 13th, 1742,

before the Lords Justices, and a vast Assembly of the Nobility and

Gentry of both Sexes.  By Mr. L. Whyte.

 

What can we offer more in Handel’s praise?

Since his Messiah gain’d him groves of bays;

Groves that can never wither nor decay,

Whose Vistos his Ability display:

Here Nature smiles, when grac’d with Handel’s art,

Transports the ear, and ravishes the heart;

To all the nobler Passions we are mov’d,

When various strains repeated and improv’d,

Express each different Circumstance and State,

As if each sound became articulate.

None but the Great Messiah could inflame,

And raise his Soul to so Sublime a Theme, [90]

Profound the Thoughts, the subject all divine,

Not like the tales of Pindus and the Nine:

Or Heathen Deities, those Sons of Fiction,

Sprung from old Fables, stuff’d with contradiction;

But our Messiah, blessed be his name!

Both Heaven and Earth his Miracles proclaim.

His Birth, his Passion, and his Resurrection,

With his ascension have a strong connection;

What Prophets spoke, or Sybils could relate,

In him were all their Prophecies compleat.

The Word made Flesh, both God and Man became;

Then let all nations glorify his name!

Let Halleluiahs round the Globe be sung,

To our Messiah, from a virgin sprung.[38]

 

 

 

Apr 21

On reading the Advertisement for Sig. Geminiani’s Concert,

at the Theatre in the Hay-Market, on Thursday the 22d inst.

 

SHOU’D Orpheus leave the Shades, and re-appear,

Who wou’d not croud his heavenly Strains to hear?

Britons be just, and present Worth allow:

What Orpheus was, Geminiani’s now.[39]

 

 

 

[Apr 23/] May 4

[Edward Holdsworth in Venice to Charles Jennens]

 

[…] Your letter came time enough for me to pack up the first Vol. of the Vindiciae among Mr Pitt’s books for yr friend Mr Sandford. The box is sent by Sea. So He must run the risque of falling into the hands of the Privateers. My sending you the 2 Volumes of Cardl. Thomasius wth Blanchini’s Vindiciae, was an imposition of the Bookseller, who assur’d me when I bought the first Vol. that the rest was coming out. Upon wch I order’d him to send it bound like the other, as soon as publish’d. And did not discover the mistake, till after I had paid for them, & was packing them up, when ’twas too late to return them. However I am glad you have no exception to them. The other part of the Vindiciae is not yet publish’d, but the Bookseller assur’d me when I was last there that ’tis in the Press. But I don’t give much credit to a man who has once trick’d me.

I am sorry to hear the Italian Operas I sent you gave you so little pleasure. and I am the more concern’d, because besides Latilla’s Themistocles, wch you order’d, I had of my own head made a large purchase of Operas, Oratorios, Cantatas, & what not, for you, before I receiv’d yr letter. In short I have bought for you above 150l weight of musick, enough to fill a large box, wch I have order’d to be sent wth Mr Pitt’s things. I mention the wght, because as you know I am perfectly ignorant of Musick, I thought it the best way to buy it as some people do Libraries by the pound, and take my chance whether it prov’d good or bad. All that I can say of it is that ’tis part of Cardinal Ottoboni’s Collection; and most of it by celebrated hands, such as Scarlatti, Pollaroli, Mancini, Bencini, and Marcello. And the purchase not very great; the whole amounting not to above 40 Shillings, besides the expences of sending it home, so that in case it shou’d prove as bad as the rest you have from hence ’twill be almost worth the money for ye Housekepper to put under pyes. And one comfort is, that shou’d it [1v] fall into the hands of the Spaniards, the loss wou’d not be very deplorable. Since Baron D’Astorga is one of your favourites I am sorry his name was not amongst the others. But his compositions are scarce at Rome, and notwithstanding I enquir’d often for him, I never cou’d meet with any more of his pieces than those I sent you. I am told that Conti often talks with pleasure of returning again to England; wch I believe wou’d not be disagreable to you & some of your friends. […][40]

 

 

 

Apr 27, Dublin

We hear that Mrs. Cibber will perform next Friday at the Musick-hall

in Fishamble-street, to the Charitable and Musical Society.[41]

 

 

 

May 11, Dublin

As several of the Nobility and Gentry have desired to hear Mr. Handel’s Grand Oratorio of Saul, it will be performed on the 25th Inst. at the New Musick-hall in Fishamble-street, with some Concertos on the Organ.  Tickets will be delivered at Mr. Handel’s House in Abbey-street, and at Mr. Neal’s in Christ-church-yard, at Half a Guinea each.  A Ticket for the Rehearsal (which will be on Friday the 21st) will be given gratis with the Ticket for the Performance.  Both the Rehearsal and the Performance will begin at 12 at Noon.[42]

 

 

 

May 14

[Charles Jennens in Gopsall to Edward Holdsworth]

 

Your Ottobonian Collection will be welcome. The Cardinal was once a Patron of Handel’s, & I have one or two Pieces compos’d by Handel for his Eminence. This is some argument to me of Tast[e]. Besides, two of those you mention, Scarlatti & Marcello, are good Composers to my Knowledge: the rest I know not, but hope the best of ’em.

            […] Since I wrote last Mr Gordon has got the Hebrew Concordance from Paris, but wou’d still be obliged to you for the Grammer.[43]

 

 

 

May 17

[Benjamin Tate to the “Bloods”]

 

[“May 17th 1742”]

 

[...]

We shall send Fritz some of his Musick very soon, we have got Subscribers

enough to Pay for the printing of it, and will do all we can to get him a

little money in his Pocket, but I would not have him expect much, for the

People here are such goths that they seem resolved to like nothing but Geminiani.

[...][44]

 

 

 

May 21, Dublin

Yesterday there was a Rehearsal of the Oratorio of Saul, at the Musick-Hall in Fishamble-street, at which there was a most grand, polite and numerous Audience, which gave such universal Satisfaction, that it was agreed by all the Judges present, to have been the finest Performance that hath been heard in this Kingdom.[45]

 

 

 

May 25

[Horace Walpole to Horace Mann]

 

Downing Street, May 26, 1742.

 

TODAY calls itself May the 26th as you perceive by the date, but

I am writing to you by the fireside, instead of going to Vauxhall.

If we have one warm day in seven, We bless our stars and think it

luxury.  And yet we have as much waterworks and fresco diversions,

as if we lay ten degrees nearer warmth.  Two nights ago Ranelagh

Gardens were opened at Chelsea; the Prince, Princess, Duke, much

nobility, and much mob besides were there.  There is a vast

amphitheatre, finely gilt, painted and illuminated, into which everybody

that loves eating, drinking, staring, or crowding, is admitted for

twelvepence.  The building and disposition of the gardens cost £16,000.

Twice a week there are to be ridottos at guinea tickets, for which

you are to have a supper and music.  I was there last night, but did not

find the joy of it.  Vauxhall is a little better, for the garden is pleasanter,

and one goes by water.  Our operas are almost over; there were but

three and forty people last night in the pit and boxes.  There is a little [435]

simple farce at Drury Lane, called Miss Lucy in Town, in which Mrs

Clive mimics the Muscovita admirably, and Beard Amorevoli intolerably.

But all the run is now after Garrick, a wine merchant who

is turned player at Goodman’s Fields.  He plays all parts, and is a

very good mimic.  His acting I have seen, and may say to you, who

will not tell it again here, I see nothing wonderful in it; but it is

heresy to say so: [...][46]

 

 

 

May 29, Dublin

At the particular Desire of several of the Nobility and Gentry, on Thursday next, being the 3d Day of June, at the New Musick-Hall in Fishamble-street, will be performed, Mr. Handel’s new grand sacred Oratorio, called MESSIAH, with Concertos on the Organ.  Tickets will be delivered at Mr. Handel’s House in Abby-street, and at Mr. Neal’s in Christ-church-yard, at half a Guinea each.  A Rehearsal Ticket will be given gratis with the Ticket for the Performance.  The Rehearsal will be on Tuesday the 1st of June at 12, and the Performance at 7 in the Evening.  In order to keep the Room as cool as possible, a Pane of Glass will be removed from the Top of each of the Windows.——NB.  This will be the last Performance of Mr. Handel’s, during his Stay in this Kingdom.[47]

 

 

 

Jun 8, Dublin

Last Tuesday Mr. Gifford the celebrated Comedian arrived here from London; and Mr. Delane, Mr. Garrick and Miss Woffington are hourly expected here from England, to Play in Smock-Alley Theatre, [...][48]

 

 

 

Jun 13, Dublin

Mr. Garrick, Miss Woffington and Mrs. Barbarini arrived here last Sunday, and will entertain the Town at Smock Alley Theatre; [...][49]

 

 

 

Jun 24

[Edward Holdsworth in London to Charles Jennens]

 

[…] We have no news yet of Mr Pitt’s things wch was sent from Legorn. amongst wch is ye box of Musick of Cardl. Ottoboni’s Collection wch I mention’d to you before. In the same box is Latilla’s Themistocles, & the Vatican Virgil. Besides wch there is amongst Mr Pitt’s books, Mr Sandford’s, Vindiciae. […]

            […] There is likewise coming from Venice Concord. Heb.

            […] [postcript] I have bought a Drawing of a person for whom you have a great respect wch I have left with yr Uncle C. for you.[50]

 

 

 

Jun 30, Dublin

Last Wednesday the ingenious Mr. Arne, Brother to Mrs. Cibber, and Composer of the Musick of Comus, together with his Wife (the celebrated Singer) arrived here from London.[51]

 

 

 

Jul 14

[Lord Guernsey to James Harris, 14 July 1742]

 

            As I have long had a promise of having the pleasure of seeing you at Packington, I hope it will not be long before I shall meet you & your brother there […] I […] am to meet Mr Jennens at Packington on Saturday night. Whatever time suits best for your conveniency will be agreeable to me […] Whenever you come Mr Jennens will give you the meeting, & I have bought a harpsicord which I want you to try.[52]

 

 

 

Jul 17

[Edward Holdsworth in London to Charles Jennens]

 

[postscript] Mr Pitt has advice yt his things are put on board the Jannet. Capn. Robt. Macklish from Leghorn.[53]

 

 

 

Aug 12 NS

[Horace Mann in Florence to Horace Walpole, Sunday 12 August (NS) 1742]

 

I have promised for the benefit of the accademia to get from England Hendal’s overtures and Corelli’s concerts, and in return I’ll send you all the pretty airs I can get.[54]

 

 

 

Aug 14, Dublin

Yesterday, the Right Hon. the Lady King, the celebrated Mr.

Handel, and several other Persons of Distinction, embarked on

board one of the Chester Traders, in order to go to Parkgate.[55]

 

 

 

Aug 20

[Horace Walpole to Horace Mann, Friday 20 August 1742 (OS)]

 

            I am now going to write to your brother to get you the overtures; and to dresire he will send them with some pamphlets and the magazines, which I left him in commission for you, at my leaving London.[56]

 

 

 

Aug 31

[Lord Guernsey in Packington near Coventry to James Harris, 31 August 1742]

 

Mr Jennens is now with me & desires his service to you & your brother.[57]

 

 

 

August

To Miss MARGARETTA W————— at Vaux hall.

 

HOW bright and how gladsome the scene,

   When sweet Margaretta appear’d;

Ye powers! what a shape! what a mien!

   Can ought with the nymph be compar’d?

[...]

But mark! how her wrapt senses stray,

   With Handel’s melodious choir;

See thoughtful regarding the lay,         

   Her bosom heaves time to the lyre.[58]

 

 

 

Sep 9

[Handel to Charles Jennens]

 

London Septr: 9th. 1742.

Dear Sr.

It was indeed Your humble Servant which intended You a visit in my

way from Ireland to London, for I certainly could have given You

a better Account by word of mouth, as by writing, how well Your

Messiah was received in that Country, yet as a Noble Lord, and

no less then [sic] the Bishop of Elphin (a Nobleman very learned in Musick)

has given his observations in writing of this Oratorio, I send

You here annexed the Contents of it in his own words. ———

I shall send the printed Book of the Messiah to Mr Isted for You.

As for my Success in general in that generous and polite Nation, I reserve

the Account of it till I have the Hon[n]our to see You in London.

The report that the Direction of the Opera next winter is com[m]itted

to my Care is groundless.  The gentlemen who have undertaken

to middle [sic] with Harmony can not agree, and are quite in a

Confusion.  Whether I shall do some thing in the Oratorio way

(as several of my friends desire) I can not determine as yet.

Certain it is that this time 12 month I shall continue my

Oratorio’s in Ireland, where they are a going to make a

large Subscription allready for that Purpose. ———

If had know’n that My Lord Guernsey was so near when I [verso]

pass’d Coventry, You may easily imagine, Sir, that I should not have

neglected of paying my Respects to him, since you know the

particular Esteem I have for His Lordship.  I think it a very long

time to the month of November next when I can have some hopes

of seeng you here in Town.  Pray let me hear mean while of your

Health and Wellfare, of which I take a real Share beeng with an

uncommon sincerity and Respect

Sr

Your

most obliged humble Servant

George Frideric Handel[59]

 

 

 

Sep [‘7ber.’] 10

[Edward Holdsworth in London (at ‘Mrs Drake’s in Downing Street Westminster’) to Charles Jennens]

 

[…] I suppose you have heard of Mr Handel’s return to London, wch wou’d have been great joy to you, if you did not at ye same time hear that He is to return again to Ireland for ye winter. […][60]

 

 

 

[April-August]

[Edward Synge Bishop of Elphin]

 

As Mr. Handel in his oratorio’s greatly excells all other

Composers I am acquainted with, so in the famous one, called

the Messiah he seems to have excell’d himself. The whole

is beyond any thing I had a notion of till I Read and heard it.

It seems to be a Species of Musick different from any

other, and this is particularly remarkable of it, That

tho’ the Composition is very Masterly & artificial, yet

the Harmony is so great and open, as to please all who

have Ears & will hear, learned & unlearn’d.

Without doubt this Superior Excellence is owing in

some measure to the great care & exactness which Mr

Handel seems to have us’d in preparing this Piece.

But Some reasons may be given why He has Succeeded

better in this than perhaps He could with all his skill

fully exerted, have done in any other.

 

1.

one is the Subject, which is the greatest & most

interesting, It Seems to have inspir’d him.

2.

another is the Words, which are all Sublime, or

affecting in the greatest degree. [1v]

3.

a third reason for the Superior Excellence of this

piece, ’Tis this there is no Dialogue. In every

Drame there must be a great deal, & often broken

into very Short Speeches & Answers. If these

be flat, & insipid, they move laughter or Contempt.

 

Whereas in this Piece the attension [sic] of the Audience is

Engag’d from one end to the other: And the Parts Set in

Recitativo, being Continu’d Sentences, & Some times adorn’d

with so much applause by the audience as the rest. –

They Seem’d indeed throughly engag’d frome one end to the

other. And, to their great honour, tho the young &

gay of both Sexes were present in great numbers, their

behaviour was uniformly grave & decent, which Show’d

that they were not only pleas’d but affected with the

performance. Many, I hope, were instructed by it,

and had proper Sentiments impres’d in a Stronger Manner

on their Minds.

If these observations be just, they may furnish

Mr. Handel with Some hints for any future pieces,

which He may undertake to Compose. [2r]

Instead of giving Rules for this, I’ll point out

an instance or two.

 

Plan for an Oratorio

Title. the Penitent.

Part: 1.

To be made up with of passages describing the Right-

eousness of God. That He is of purer Eyes than to behold

iniquity — is just to punish Sinners, mercifull to them

that repent, loves & cherishes the good, but Shews indig-

nation aginst [sic] them that do evil — a number of particulars

will easily offer themselves here.

Part 2d.

Two Characters to be introduc’d 1. a Good man

obedient to the Laws of God, flourishing like a green

bay tree, enjoying peace of mind & prosperity, & on a

reverse of fortune patient & resign’d in adversity,

trusting in God, and by him supported & reliev’d & 2.

a Wicked man acting in defiance of God, Saying Just

I shall never be mov’d Strenghtening [sic] himself in his

wickedness for a time, but at last visited with Evils,

under which He falls into misery & some horrors, at

first without any Compunction or thought, of returning

to God. These two Characters may be mix’d, as the [2v]

L’ Allegro ed il Penseroso are, which would have a

very good effect, & it would not be amiss to introduce

the wicked man as insulting the good in affliction &

tempting him to forsake God. The Book of Job will

furnish variety of fine passages for this purpose.

Part. 3.

To begin with the good man exhorting the wicked

loaded with afflictions, and Sunk under them, to re-

turn to God by repentance, then on these Exhortation

having their effect, The wicked man to address him-

self to God, Confess his guilt, beg pardon & forgiveniss.

The Psalms commonly Call’d the Penitential Psalms

will furnish variety of fine passages for this. Lastly

to conclude with the joy of the Penitent on his

prayers being heard, and the Good man & He joyn

in Celebrating ye. mercy & goodness of God, who par-

dons Sinners on Sincer Repentance & Reformation.

This to be further carried on into the Grand Chorus.

 

[Handel’s note in J. C. Smith’s writing]

I send you this Sr. only to show you how zealous they are

in Ireland for Oratorio’s. I could send you a number of Instances

more from others in Print and in writing.[61]

 

 

 

Oct 8

[Richard Dovey in Bath to James Harris, 8 October 1742]

 

I promis’d Lord Guernsey to give him some account of you. I was at Packington not long before I left Birmingham […] Your acquaintance Mr Jennings was there & we drank your health constantly.[62]

 

 

 

Oct 29

[Charles Jennens in Gopsall to Edward Holdsworth]

 

[…] You was misinform’d about Mr. Handel, who does not return to Ireland till next Winter; so that I hope to have some very agreeable Entertainments from him this Season. His Messiah by all accounts is his Masterpiece.[63]

 

 

 

[Nov 23/] Dec 4

[Edward Holdsworth in Angers to Charles Jennens]

 

Dear Sr.

[…] I am glad to hear yt I was misinform’d about Mr Handel; since He is to stay in London I need not fear yr spending yr winter to yr satisfaction. The agreable entertainments He will give you, will I hope divert you from giving yr self the trouble of a 2d edition of Philippi, especially before the first is half sold. […] I hope your Musick books & all the others will be found right according to the Catalogue. I am satisfied yt you have not any expectation of the Musick proving good, and therefore cannot be much disappointed; but I hope you will find some of it at least worth 3d pr pound, wch is not much more than the price of wast paper. Many of the authors, as I have been inform’d, were celebrated amongst the Italians, therefore pray be merciful, and don’t put such an affront upon Italy as to condemn them all to the flames.[64]

 

 

 

[List of Subscribers]

 

Mr. Handell

 

[list is not paginated.]

 

On the LORD Viscount DUNCANNON.

[…]

He serves the Publick, and assists the State;

Actions humane adorn him in his Place,

And claim our Praises with becoming Grace.

Such is the character the Muse would sing,

Worthy of Handell’s Notes, and Dubourg’s String;[65]

 

 

 

Would you the Sister-Arts improve in Schools?

In Sculpture follow RYSBRACK’s chosen Rules;

In Portrait seek for AMICONI’s Force:

Humour in HOGARTH: WOOTEN for a Horse:

In Landscape, LAMBERT; or in Crayons, see

The Charms of Colours flowing from GOUPEE.

In Eloquence, you see young MURRAY shine;

In Musick, HANDEL’s Graces are divine.[66]

 

 

 

WING, wing away, no Muse we need invoke,

For F—l---t---d ev’ry Muse’s Heart hath broke,

Unstrung the Lyre, with common Sense made War,

Ev’n Handel’s Notes at his Appearance jar,[67]

 



[1] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 75, f. 1r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 108–109.

[2] Townsend, 54.

[3] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1625, Tuesday 5 – Saturday 9 January 174[2], [3]; repr., no. 1626, Saturday 9 – Tuesday 12 January 174[2], [2].

[4] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1627, Tuesday 12 – Saturday 16 January 174[2], [2]; repr., no. 1628, Saturday 16 – Tuesday 19 January 174[2], [2]; without the “NB” section, no. 1629, Tuesday 19 – Saturday 25 January 174[2], [2]; also in no. 1630, Saturday 23 – Tuesday 26 January 174[2], [2]; Townsend, 53.

[5] Deutsch, 535.

[6] Townsend, 54-55; Deutsch, 536.

[7] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1631, Tuesday 26 – Saturday 30 January 174[2], [2]; repr., no. 1632, Saturday 30 January – Tuesday 2 February 174[2], [2]; partly repr., Townsend, 58-59.

[8] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1631, Tuesday 26 – Saturday 30 January 174[2], [2].

[9] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 77, ff. 1, 3, 4v; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 109–111; (‘I gave Handel … or care.’ ‘A little piece … Moderatissimo.’) Autograph Letters of George Frideric Handel and Charles Jennens (auction catalog, Christie, Manson & Woods, July 4, 1973), 22; (second paragraph except last three sentences, fourth paragraph, ‘A little piece … Moderatissimo.’) Händel Handbuch, 344.

[10] Pue’s Occurrences, vol. 39, no. 11, Tuesday 2 – Saturday 6 February 1741-2, [3]; repr., Townsend, 29.

[11] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, 2-6 February 1742: Townsend, 59.

[12] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1634, Saturday 6 – Tuesday 9 February 174[2], [1]; partly repr., Townsend, 59-60.

[13] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal: Townsend, 61.

[14] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 163[5], Tuesday 9 – Saturday 13 February 1741-2, [2-3]; repr. with minor modifications, no. 1635 [sic], Saturday 13 – Tuesday 16 February 1741-2, [3]; no. 1636, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 20 February 1741-2, [3].

[15] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1635, Saturday 13 – Tuesday 16 February 174[2], [3].

[16] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1636, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 20 February 1741-2, [3].

[17] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1637, Saturday 20 – Tuesday 23 February 1741-2, [2]; partly repr., Townsend, 62.

[18] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1638, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 February 1741-2, [2]; partly repr., Townsend, 62.

* N. B. There are but Seven Notes in Musick.

| Orpheus in Sylvis, inter Delphinas Arion.

                                                Virg. Eclog. 8.

* The Harpsicord [sic], or Spinnet.

[19] Laurence Whyte, Original Poems on Various Subjects, Serious, Moral, and Diverting...To this Edition, are added the following Poems never before published, viz. I. On the general Effect and Excellencies of Musick, but more particularly on the Famous Mr. Handel’s Compositions and Performance ..., 2nd edition (Dublin: S. Powell, 1742), 1-6 (separate pagination); Chrissochoidis, 755-58.

[20] Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann I, ed. W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith, and George L. Lam (New Haven: Yale University Press / London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1954), 352-59.

[21] Townsend, 66.

[22] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1640, Tuesday 2 – Saturday 6 March 1741-2, [3]; repr., Townsend, 67-68.

[23] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1641, Saturday 6 – Tuesday 9 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., Townsend, 68.

[24] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1642, Tuesday 9 – Saturday 13 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., Townsend, 69.

[25] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1643, Saturday 13 – Tuesday 16 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., Townsend, 69.

[26] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1644, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 20 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., no. 1645, Saturday 20 – Tuesday 23 March 1741-2, [2].

[27] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1644, Tuesday 16 – Saturday 20 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., no. 1646, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 March 1741-2, [2]; no. 1647, Saturday 27 – Tuesday 30 March 1741-2, [2].

[28] Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 134.

[29] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1646, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 March 1741-2, [2]; repr., no. 1647, Saturday 27 –Saturday 30 1741-2, [2]; repr. (second paragraph), Townsend, 69-70.

[30] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1646, Tuesday 23 – Saturday 27 March 1741-2, [2]; repr. with slight modifications (“...new Grand Sacred Oratorio...”), no. 1647, Saturday 27 – Tuesday 30 March 1741-2, [2]; no. 1648, Tuesday 30 March – Saturday 3 April 1742, [2]; no. 1648, Saturday 3 – Tuesday 6 April 1742, [2].

[31] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1648, Tuesday 30 March – Saturday 3 April 1742, [2]; repr., no. 1648 [sic], Saturday 3 – Tuesday 6 April 1742, [2]; repr., Townsend, 70-71.

[32] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1649, Tuesday 6 – Saturday 10 April 1742, [2]; repr., Townsend, 86-87.

[33] The Daily Advertiser, no. 3503, Monday 12 April 1742, [1].

[34] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, 13 April: Townsend, 87-88.

[35] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1650, Saturday 10 – Tuesday 13 April 1742, [2].

[36] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1651, Tuesday 13 – Saturday 17 April 1742, [2]; partly repr., Pue’s Occurrences, vol. 39, no. 31, Tuesday 13 – Saturday 17 April 1742, [3]; repr. Townsend, 88.

[37] Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann I, ed. W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith, and George L. Lam (New Haven: Yale University Press / London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1954), 396-98.

[38] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, 17-20 April 1742: Townsend, 89-90.

[39] The Daily Advertiser, no. 3511, Wednesday 21 April 1742, [1].

[40] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 78, f. 1; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 111–112.

[41] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1654, Saturday 24 – Tuesday 27 April 1742, [2].

[42] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1658, Saturday 8 – Tuesday 11 May 1742, [2]; repr. with modifications, “The Rehearsal will begin at 12 at Noon, and the Performance at 7.” no. 1659, Tuesday 11 – Saturday 15 May 1742, [3]; same in no. 1660, Saturday 15 – Tuesday 18 May 1742, [2]; with addition “To begin at 7 o’clock.  Books to be had at the Musick-hall, price a British Sixpence.” no. 1661, Tuesday 18 – Saturday 22 May 1742, [2]; the same in no. 1662, Saturday 22 – Tuesday 25 May 1742, [2]; repr., Townsend, 94-95.

[43] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 79, f. 1r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 112; (except last two sentences) Händel Handbuch, 350.

[44] British Library, Add. Ms. 37934, f. 33r.

[45] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1661, Tuesday 18 – Saturday 22 May 1742, [2]; repr., Townsend, 95.

[46] Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann I, ed. W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith, and George L. Lam (New Haven: Yale University Press / London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1954), 434-35.

[47] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1663, Tuesday 25 – Saturday 29 May 1742, [2]; repr., no. 1664, Saturday 29 May – Tuesday 1 June 1742, [2]; repr., Townsend, 95-96.

[48] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1667, Tuesday 8 – Saturday 12 June 1742, [2].

[49] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1668, Saturday 12 – Tuesday 15 June 1742, [2].

[50] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 80, f. 2r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 113.

[51] George Faulkner.  The Dublin Journal, no. 1673, Tuesday 29 June – Saturday 3 July 1742, [2].

[52] Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 138.

[53] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 82, f. 2v; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 113.

[54] Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann, II (“The Yale Edition of Horace Walpole’s Correspondence, Vol. 18”), ed. W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith and George L. Lam (New Haven: Yale University Press / London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1954), 13.

[55] The Dublin Newsletter, 14 August 1742: Townsend, 101.

[56] Horace Walpole’s Correspondence with Sir Horace Mann, II (“The Yale Edition of Horace Walpole’s Correspondence, Vol. 18”), ed. W. S. Lewis, Warren Hunting Smith and George L. Lam (New Haven: Yale University Press / London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1954), 31.

[57] Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 140.

[58] The London Magazine: And Monthly Chronologer 11 (1742), 408; Chrissochoidis, 759.

[59] Autograph Letters of George Frideric Handel and Charles Jennens (auction catalog, Christie, Manson & Woods, July 4, 1973), 11; facsimile of first page, pp. 14/15.

[60] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 83, f. 2r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 113.

[61] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2379; repr. Händel Handbuch, 353-54.

[62] Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 142.

[63] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 84, f. 1v; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 114; Autograph Letters of George Frideric Handel and Charles Jennens (auction catalog, Christie, Manson & Woods, July 4, 1973), 22; Händel Handbuch, 354.

[64] Foundling Museum, Gerald Coke Handel Collection, accession no. 2702, “Jennens Holdsworth Letters 2,” item 85, f. 1r; repr. Amanda Babington and Ilias Chrissochoidis, “Musical References in the Jennens–Holdsworth Correspondence (1729–46),” Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle, 45:1 (2014), 76–129: 114.

[65] John Winstanley, Poems written occasionally by John Winstanley … interspers’d with many Others, by Several Ingenious Hands (London: the author, 1742), 12; Chrissochoidis, 759-60.

[66] [Robert Morris], The Art of Architecture, A Poem.  In Imitation of Horace’s Art of Poetry.  Humbly Inscribed to the Rt. Honble the Earl of --------- (London: R. Dodsley, 1742), 15; Chrissochoidis, 760.

[67] A Clear Stage, and no Favour: Or, Tragedy and Comedy at War.  Occasion’d by the Emulation of the two Theatric Heroes, David and Goliah.  Left to the Impartial Decision of the Town (London: J. Huggonson, [1742]), 4; Chrissochoidis, 760.