1747

 

 

Jan 20

[4th Earl of Shaftesbury to James Harris]

 

London, 20 January 1746/7.

Mr. Handel call’d on me to’ther day.  He is now in perfect health;

and I really think grown young again.  There is a most absurd and

ridiculous opera going forward, at present, and as it is not likely to

meet with success he is delighted.  We shall have a little music in Lent.[1]

 

 

 

 

January

The SYMPATHY of SOUND and SENSE.

(Alter’d from SHAKESPEAR.)

To SAVILLETTA.

 

IF Musick and sweet Poetry agree,

As they must so (the Sister and the Brother)

How great, my Love! ‘twixt us the Sympathy!

Since you admire the one, and I the other.

 

Handel to you is dear, whose heav’nly Touch

Upon the Organ, charms all human Sense;

Pope’s dear to me, whose poignant Wit is such,

Beyond the Critick’s Rage, needs no Defence.

 

You’re lost to hear the sweet melodious Sound,

Which Handel’s Hand (the God of Musick) makes;

And I am lost in Extasies profound,

When Pope (the God of Verse to Satire takes.) [sic]

One God is God of both, as Poets feign;

I worship both, since both in you remain.[2]

 

 

 

 

Feb 26

[Thomas Harris in London to James Harris, 26 February 1747]

 

§I believe there is some alteration in Handels scheme of performances: I am informed by Lord Guernsey & Mr Jennens that he does not intend to begin till Wednesday seenight on account of Lord Lovats tryal which begins this day seenight, & so might prevent company coming, if he began as he proposed on Friday the 6th of March. They tell me also that he begins with Belshazzar & afterwards performs Sampson, before his new one. But all this may not be true, and therefore I called this morning on Walsh, who could not give me any better information, but promised to call this afternoon on Handel & learn all particulars […][3]

 

 

 

PRINCE WILLIAM,

DUKE OF CUMBERLAND,

THIS FAINT PORTRAITURE

OF A

Truly Wise, Valiant, and Virtuous COMMANDER,

As to the Possessor of the like Noble Qualities,

IS,

With most profound Respect and Veneration,

INSCRIBED,

By His ROYAL HIGHNESS’S

Most obedient, and

most devoted Servant,

The AUTHOR.[4]

 

 

 

Mar 2

                  We hear, by the Desire of several of the Nobility and Gentry, that Mr. Handel, will exhibit in Lent some Musical Performances, in Order thereto he has compos’d a New Oratorio.[5]

 

 

 

Mar 6

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, March 6, will be perform’d

The OCCASIONAL ORATORIO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

[l]ery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock, [sic][6]

 

 

 

 

Mar 9

BATH.

To be Sold,

TWO or Three Good VIOLINS, (one of the famous Duburgh’s) and a very good ton’d SPINNET; as also a small Collection of Musick, by Corelle [sic], Handell, and others; and likewise a Collection of Ball Dances, in Characters, for the Use of Masters, both in French and English.

Enquire of Mr. Stagg in King’s-Mead; who continues to teach at his House, and at the Lodging-Houses in Town.

N. B.  His House, with the Furniture, to be Lett for a School.[7]

 

 

 

Mar 11

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d

The OCCASIONAL ORATORIO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

[l]ery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock, [sic][8]

 

 

 

 

Mar 13

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

To-morrow, will be perform’d

The OCCASIONAL ORATORIO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

[l]ery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock, [sic][9]

 

 

 

 

Mar 16

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

on Wednesday next, will be perform’d an Oratorio, call’d

JOSEPH, AND His BRETHREN.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered that Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock, [sic][10]

 

 

 

 

Mar 18

                  The Oratorio of Joseph and His Brethren, which was to have been performed this Night, at the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden, is put off, upon Account of the Trial of Lord Lovat.[11]

 

 

 

Mar 20

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d an Oratorio, call’d

JOSEPH, and His BRETHREN.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[12]

 

 

 

 

Mar 25

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d an Oratorio, call’d

JOSEPH, and His BRETHREN.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[13]

 

 

 

 

Apr 1

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[14]

 

 

 

 

Apr 1

William Jackson, “A Short Sketch of my own Life (1802)”

 

I squeezed in among the Chorus-singers, and was remarked by

Handel, when he entered, as a Stranger – “Who are You? says he, can

you play? can you sing? if not, open your Mouth, and pretend to sing,

for there must be no idle Persons in my Band” – He was right –

However, in the course of the Evening, by turning his Leaf and some

other little Attentions, there became some sort of Acquaintance

between us, so that I gained Admittance to the frequent Repetitions

of his Oratorio; in which are more fine Parts than in any other of his

Compositions.[15]

 

 

 

Apr 3

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[16]

 

 

 

 

Apr 4

                  A few Days since, the celebrated Mrs. Storer, arriv’d from Dublin, and we hear she will perform next Week, in Mr. Handel’s Oratorio.[17]

 

 

 

Apr 8

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With ADDITIONS.

And a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[18]

 

 

 

 

Apr 10

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With ADDITIONS.

And a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[19]

 

 

 

 

Apr 10

                  Last Night their Royal Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Wales, Princess Amelia, and two of the young Princesses, were at the Theatre in Covent Garden, to see the Oratorio composed by Mr. Handell.[20]

 

 

 

Apr 13

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day,, [sic] will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With ADDITIONS.

And a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.[21]

 

 

 

 

Apr 15

COVENT-GARDEN.

AT the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden,

this Day, will be perform’d a New Oratorio, call’d

JUDAS MACCHABAEUS.

With ADDITIONS.

And a New CONCERTO.

Pit and Boxes to be put together, and no Person to be admitted

without Tickets, which will be delivered this Day, at the Office

at Covent-Garden Theatre, at Half a Guinea each.  First Gal-

lery 5 s.  Second Gallery 3 s. 6 d.

The Galleries to be Open’d at Half an Hour after Four o’Clock.

Pit and Boxes at Five.

To begin at Half an Hour after Six o’Clock.

[(]Being the Last Time of performing this Year.)[22]

 

 

 

 

Apr 30

[manuscript list of libretti]

 

Messiah (Extrait du).  Dans le livret d’un concert de l’Académie

d’ancienne musique, donné le 30 Avril, 1747.  Il est à noter qu’entre

1745 et 1749 Handel ne donna pas lui-même le Messiah une seule fois.

Les extraits exécutés par l’Académie en 1747 ne sont pas indiqués

comme étant tirés du Messiah, ils ne portent pas même le nom de

Handel.[23]

 

 

 

April

NEW BOOKS.

[...]

                  Judas Maccabaeus, a sacred Drama performed at Covent Garden, Musick by Mr Handel.[24]

 

 

 

May 7

290. Lewis Lawrence was indicted for stealing

three Prints, one Carpet, and seven Cups and Saucers,

the Good of Abraham Brown, May the 7th. [211]

Elizabeth Brown, we lost a Carpet, seven Cups and

Saucers, and three Prints; all lost the 7th Day of

May.  There was the Print of the Duke of Cumberland,

another of Mr Handel, the other of Mr Hebden.

I lost these Things that Night the Fire was at

our House.  I have nothing to say against the

Prisoner, but I found the Goods in his Apartment the

13th of June.

Q.  Where is his Apartment?

Brown.  In Prince’s-street, Cavendish square.

Q.  How came you to go to his Apartment.

Brown.  Because I had a Servant that went into the

same House to lodge, and she told me she saw our

Carpet upon his Floor; so I got a Search-Warrant,

and found the Things there.  The Carpet was on the

Ground, two of the Prints were on the Chest of

Drawers.  The Cups and Saucers were set out in the

Closet.

Eliz. Seal.  I saw the Carpet in his Lodgings.  I

can’t say directly the Day.

Q.  Did you live with Mr Abraham Brown?

Seal.  Yes, Sir, I liv’d there almost two Years.  I

saw the Carpet through the Door, and I told my

Mistress of it.

Q.  Did you see any other Thing?

Seal.  No, Sir, not till they had a Justice’s

Warrant, then I saw the Prints and the other Things. 

My Mistress ask’d Mrs Laurence, how she came by

the Things?  And she did not know any Thing of

them.  When we came before the Justice he said, he

went out of Town, and he desired his Wife to

inquire about the Things, and deliver them.  Part of

one of the Frames was left in my Master’s House.

Q.  Did he say any Thing before the Justice, how

he came by those Things?

Seal.  He said a Person brought them.  Mrs

Laurence was before the Justice first; and when he came

home and heard where she was gone he went before

the Justice; so the Justice took him and discharg’d his

Wife.

Court to the Prisoner.  Now is your Time to make

your Defence.

Laurence.  I was at my Lord Harcourt’s to dress a

Dinner, and stay’d late that Night the Fire was; as

I was coming Home a Gentleman’s Servant came to

my Door; for God’s sake, says he, a Fire is at our

House, take these Things, and I’ll call To-morow. [sic]

I says, do you know me?  My Name is Laurence.

Q. to Col. Talbot.  How long have you known

the Prisoner?

Talbot.  I have known the Prisoner at the Bar for

several Years.  I know not only his Character in

general to be as honest, industrious Man as ever liv’d,

but have known him and his Family, and entrusted him

in my House, and Relations, these twenty Years. 

I know he is a Man of much Probity and Honesty[.] 

I know him to be a Man of that Character, that

there are very few of that Probity, and take that Care

of their Children, as he does of his.

Thomas Crosdell.  I have known the Prisoner about

sixteen Years; he liv’d with my Lord Archer.  At

that Time he had an extraordinary good Character,

and his Wife too.  This Charge against the Prisoner

came within the Limits of the Act of Grace; but the

Prisoner chose to have it try’d to clear up his Character,

and he had a very good one.  He was honourably

acquitted.[25]

 

 

 

Sep 4

[William Sherborne to [the Duchess of Montagu]]

 

[“1747, Sept. 4.”]

 

“I did myself the honour to write to her Grace the Duchess of

Beaufort—the divorced Duchess—this last post . . . ; intending for

Pembridge, the place of my nativity, and proposing to wait on some of

the company that the town of Hereford is pretty full of at present,

occasioned by a Concert of Music that is performed here every third

year [...]”[26]

 

 

 

Nov 3

To the AUTHOR, &c.

                  SIR,

YOUR known Readiness to assist Englishmen in Distress, will, I doubt not, induce you to give this (or in better Words) a Place in your Paper, when you have room.  I have always been a Lover of Musick, and chiefly of the Italian:  This led me to the Rehearsal of the Opera in the Haymarket.  I was much pleased with the Choice of Mr. Handel’s Airs, but much surprized to see that scarce one English Performer was thought worthy of a Place in the Musick Room, tho’ they had been there for many Years past.

                  In the Time of the Royal Academy, many of our Nation were employ’d, and young Lads had Leave to practice there, and on Vacancies were taken into Pay.  Mr. Handel had always the same Regard for them; the Honourable Directors afterwards followed the same Plan; and even under the late Managers, though more influenced by the Italians, they still had some Favour and Justice shewn them.  The present Undertaker is a Foreigner, a Man of Merit in his own Profession, but ignorant in the Musical Way; therefore must be guided by others.

                  I had the Curiosity to enquire why these Changes were made, and particularly why the first Violin was removed, I was told by an odd-looking Fellow who speaks a Jargon (for I can give no Name to his Language) that he was grown old, was too timorous, and other Nonsense I could hardly understand; that they had endeavoured formerly to remove him, but then he was too strongly protected by his Patron; at last I found the great and only Objection was, that this Person had some Years since left their blind superstitious Worship, was become a good Subject to the Government he lives under, and, in a Word, may be esteemed an Englishman; Crimes great enough for a Priest-ridden Set of Wretches never to pardon!  Though they have neither Faith or Charity for Hereticks, they can take their Money, live and batten in the Houses of those they in themselves esteem little better than the vilest Brute:  It is however by this Nation they live, move, and have their Being.  I well know, had they staid at home, with all their Merit, they could not hope for more than to be a Valet de Chamber to one of their petty Nobility, or ride behind their Master’s Coach, if he could keep one.

                  They have shewn their Resentment to those belonging to the Guards who are now discarded; their Love to their Church will not suffer a Member of any other, unless a Countryman; that breaks no Squares; for the Chief of their Basses is a Jew, and the first Violin the most honest pious Gentleman, well known for his upright Dealings at Ranelagh last Season.  It is hoped the Case of several English Musicians, Housekeepers, who chearfully contribute their Mite to the Publick, will have some Favour, and not be sent toe seek new Employment, to make room for this ungrateful bigotted People.

                                                                        I am, your humble Servant,

                                                                                          Not a Professor, but Lover of true Musick.[27]

 

 

 

Nov 12

                  Yesterday was Rehears’d, at the King’s Theatre in the Haymarket, the Opera of LUCIUS VERUS:  This Drama Consists of Airs, borrow’d entirely from Mr. Handel’s favourite Operas; and so may (probably) be justly styl’d the most exquisite Composition of Harmony, ever offer’d to the Publick.  Those Lovers of Musick among us, whose Ears have been charm’d with Farinello, Faustina, Senesino, Cuzzoni, and other great Performers will now have an Opportunity of Reviving their former Delight; which, if not so transporting as then, may yet prove a very high Entertainment.  Mr. Handel is acknowledged (universally) so great a Master of the Lyre; that nothing urg’d in Favour of his Capital Performances, can reasonably be considered as a Puff.[28]

 

 

 

[mid-November]

[4th Countess of Shaftesbury to Elizabeth Harris]

 

I am afraid Handel will be under some difficulties if it is true that Galli is

dead which we heard from a lady who lives in the same street and

opposite to her lodgings in town. [...][29]

 

 

 

 

The Establishment of their Royal Highnesses the Princess Amelia, and the Princess Caroline.

[…]

Musick Master,

Mr. Handel[30]

 

 

 

The Establishment of their Royal Highnesses, the Princess Amelia and the Princess Carolina.

[… 97 ...]

Musick-master,

Mr Handel, Sal. 200 l. a Y[ear].[31]

 

 

 

                  THE next great Business of the Age is Musick; of our Taste in which I need say no more, to give you an adequate Idea, than barely to inform you we have Operas, in which Mr. Handel is totally silent.[32]

 

 

 

When I arrived at London, Farinelli, whom you have heard at Paris, was the delight of the court, and I then saw the Italian opera in all its splendor.  At present, it is fallen from its glory; Farinelli is in Spain, and though most of the judges are very well content with the performer that succeeds him, these entertainments are not relished.  Mr. HANDEL’s efforts to call back the publick taste are ineffectual: the house is deserted, the undertakers are ruin’d. [188]

                  The best performers are all sent away,

                  Confounded, supperless, and without pay.

In a word, the fall of the Italian opera in England, which has been so long predicted, is at last come to pass, and it has been my fortune to be an eye-witness of this great revolution.  The English accuse us [i.e. the French] of a great deal of inconstancy and fickleness in our taste; but it is not for them to cast this reproach, who are in many respects more variable than the French.  We continue to see with the same pleasure the fine operas of Lully, which have been composed now above sixty years.

                  To what can be attributed this general disgust for a kind of spectacle, of which the English seem’d lately so fond, if not to the great disproportion that was found between the prodigious expence it cost them, and the little pleasure they received in it?

[... 189 ...]

                  The Italian opera, to speak properly, is nothing but a concert; and a concert of three hours is too long for those who do not understand the language.  The charms of music are not made for the ear only; the heart should have its share in the entertainment.  The impression which sound gives to words cannot be properly felt in any other tongue, but that which is natural to us.  We may judge of this by LULLY’s recitative, which conveys such ravishing delight to us Frenchmen, but makes an Englishman or an Italian fall a laughing.  These foreigners do not consider, that it is not enough to know all the words of a tongue; and that it is necessary to speak and understand it easily, to make it as it were their own, in order to be affected with the musick that expresses it. [...]

[... 192 ...]

Is it surprizing that the English are grown tired of the Italian opera?  Three quarters of the spectators did not comprehend what was sung, and it was natural for Farinelli himself to set them a yawning, when he passed from an air to recitative.  If it be true that the Italians excel in musick all the other people of Europe, it would be most becoming of a wise nation to form their taste upon that of the Italians, and to avail themselves of their beauties, as Lully did, as Rameau does at this day with so much success; and not to renounced their own language, to sing in that of Italy, as the English have done. [193]

[...]

                  The Italians have the glory of being the inventors of this spectacle; but the honour of having brought it to perfection cannot be denyed [sic] to the French.  The dances and chorusses, which give such a variety and gaiety to the French opera, are wanting at London as well as in Italy; and bad as their operas are, it gives me pain to see them performed by actors, whose voices indeed are always just, often fine, and sometimes even admirable; but who have neither action, grace, nor countenance; who by their restrained gestures and shocking attitudes, make the eyes often pay dear for the pleasure of the ears.  Though Farinelli was a tolerable good figure, I never saw a man have less nobleness and grace in his manner than he, except his successor.  The grimaces and contortions of the celebrated Strada were [194] insupportable: whenever she sung, she had the air of a Pythoness, and it was absolutely necessary not to see her, if you were desirous of hearing her with pleasure.[33]

 

 

 

[portrait of the coxcomb]

 

                  AT the Opera or Play-house, one would think no Body had a Right to acquit or condemn but he; before the Curtain draws up, he gathers a little Circle about him to hear his Skill in Criticism, his long Acquaintance with the Stage, and a short History of the numberless Pieces, that, like the Ghosts in the What-d’ye-call-it, owe their Deaths to him; talks of Handel as his Right Hand Man, calls Pope by his Christian Name, and speaks [14] of Shakespear as a good pretty Writer, considering the Times he liv’d in.[34]

 

 

 

[satirical portraits of fashionable people]

 

[...] let us hasten to the polite Harmodio.  It is he who seems to be dissolved in an extasy, at hearing that Concerto they are now playing.  He is one of the principal Subscribers to the present Operas, and a violent enemy of the great and inimitable Handel.  He has no ear for music, and cannot distinguish a Gig from an Adagio, yet affects to be in raptures at the tasteless unaffecting compositions, or rather musical rhapsodies of Gluck.  He has a greater esteem for the first fiddle at the Haymarket, than for Chesterfield or [24] Lyttelton, or the greatest Patriot that ever adorned History.[35]

 

 

 

“ODE On the Approach of Winter in the Year 1747”

[...]

To what new scenes shall I repair?

To shun the busy phamtom Care?

  What gay amusements try?

Shall music’s soothing charms delight?

Or shall I dedicate the night

  To mirth, and social joy?

 

No, no, ’twere mad to think on these,

When lovely Daphne, form’d to please,

  Such pow’r to charm enjoys;

To the soft music of whose tongue

Ev’n Handel’s airs, and Frasi’s song,

  Are discord all, and noise.[36]

 

 

 

 

[a call for Chesterfield to save the nation]

 

[…]

YE sacred Shades! who through th’ Elysian Grove,

With Rome’s fam’d Chiefs, and Grecian Sages rove,

Blush, to behold what Arts your Offspring grace:

Each fopling Heir now marks his Sire’s Disgrace;

An Embryo Breed! of such a doubtful Frame,

You scarce could know the Sex, but by her Name:

Fraught with the native Follies of his Home,

Torn from the Nurse, the Babe of Birth must roam;

Through foreign Climes exotic Vice explore,

And cull each Weed, regardless of the Flow’r.

Proud of thy Spoils, O Italy and France!

The soft enervate Strain, and cap’ring Dance;

From Sequan’s Streams, and winding Banks of Po,

He comes, ye Gods! an all-accomplish’d Beau!

Unhumaniz’d in Dress, with Cheek so wan,

He mocks GOD’s Image in the mimic Man:

Great Judge of Arts! o’er Toilets now presides,

Corrects our Fashions, or an Opera guides;

From Tyrant HANDEL rends th’ Imperial Bay,

And guards the Magna Charta of --- Sol-fa.

SICK of a Land where Virtue dwells no more,

See LIBERTY prepar’d to quit our Shore;

[…][37]

 

 



[1] Betty Matthews, “Handel – More Unpublished Letters,” Music and Letters 42 (1961), 127-31: 127; Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 233.

[2] The Newcastle General Magazine (Newcastle upon Tyne: John Gooding, 1747), 16; Chrissochoidis, 777.

[3] Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 235.

[4] Thomas Morell, Judas Macchabaeus.  A Sacred Drama.  As it is Perform’d at the Theatre-Royal in Covent-Garden.  The Musick by Mr. Handel (London: John Watts, 1747), dedication page; Chrissochoidis, 777.

[5] The General Advertiser, no. 3853, Monday 2 March 1746-7, [1].

[6] The General Advertiser, no. 3857, Friday 6 March 1746-7, [2]; partly repr. Deutsch 637.

[7] The Bath Journal 3 (nr. 51, Monday 9 March 1747), 202; (nr. 52, Monday 16 March 1747), 206; (nr. 53, Monday 23 March 1747), 210; and others.

[8] The General Advertiser, no. 3861, Wednesday 11 March 1746-7, [2].

[9] The General Advertiser, no. 3862, Thursday 12 March 1746-7, [2].

[10] The General Advertiser, no. 3865, Monday 16 March 1746-7, [2]; partly repr. Deutsch, 637.

[11] The General Advertiser, no. 3867, Wednesday 18 March 1746-7, [1].

[12] The General Advertiser, no. 3869, Friday 20 March 1746-7, [2].

[13] The General Advertiser, no. 3871, Wednesday 25 March 1746-7, [2].

[14] The General Advertiser, no. 3878, Wednesday 1 April 1747, [2]; partly repr. Deutsch 638.

[15] William Jackson, “A Short Sketch of my own Life (1802),” ed. Amal Asfour and Paul Williamson, Gainsborough’s House Review 1996/1997 (Sudbury, 1998), 57-112: 60: H. Diack Johnstone, “Handel and his bellows-blower (Maurice Greene),” Göttinger Händel-Beiträge 7 (1998), 208-17: 209.

[16] The General Advertiser, no. 3880, Friday 3 April 1747, [2].

[17] The General Advertiser, no. 3880, Saturday 4 April 1747, [1].

[18] The General Advertiser, no. 3883, Wednesday 8 April 1747, [2].

[19] The General Advertiser, no. 3885, Friday 10 April 1747, [2].

[20] The Whitehall Evening-Post; Or, London Intelligencer, no. 181, Thursday 9 – Saturday 11 April 1747, [3].

[21] The General Advertiser, no. 3887, Monday 13 April 1747, [2].

[22] The General Advertiser, no. 3889, Wednesday 15 April 1747, [2].

[23] William C. Smith, “Handeliana,” Music & Letters 31 (1950), 125-32: 132.

[24] The Newcastle General Magazine (Newcastle upon Tyne: John Gooding, 1747), 116; Chrissochoidis, 777-78.

[25] The Proceedings on the King’s Commissions of the Peace, and Oyer and Termines held for the City of London and County of Middlesex, at Justice-Hall in the Old Baily, on Wednesday July 15, and Thursday July 16. In the 21st Year of His Majesty’s Reign. ... Number VI. (London: J. Hinton, 1747), 210-11.

[26] Report on the Manuscripts of the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry, K.G., K.T., preserved at Montagu House, Whitehall. Vol. 1 (London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, 1899), 412.

[27] The London Evening-Post, no. 3120, Saturday 31 October – Tuesday 3 November 1747, [4].

[28] The General Advertiser, no. 4071, Friday 13 November 1747, [1].

[29] Betty Matthews, “Handel – More Unpublished Letters,” Music and Letters 42 (1961), 127-31: 128; correctly attributed and dated in Donald Burrows and Rosemary Dunhill (eds.), Music and Theatre in Handel’s World: The Family Papers of James Harris (1732–1780) (Oxford and New York, 2002), 244.

[30] The Court Kalendar Compleat, for the Year 1747 (London: James Watson, 1747), [10]2; Chrissochoidis, 778.

[31] The Court and City Register for the Year 1747 (London: R. Amey et al., 1747), 96-97; Chrissochoidis, 778.

[32] [Sarah Fielding], Familiar Letters between the Principal Characters in David Simple, and some Others, 2 vols. (London: the author, 1747), 2:299; Chrissochoidis, 778.

[33] Jean Bernard Le Blanc, Letters on the English and French Nations, 2 vols. (London: J. Brindley et al., 1747), 2:187-89, 192-94; Chrissochoidis, 778-79.

[34] Henry Stonecastle, The Universal Spectator, 4 vols. (London: A. Ward, et al., [1747]), 13-14; Chrissochoidis, 779.

[35] [Joseph Warton], Ranelagh House: A Satire in Prose: In the Manner of Monsieur Le Sage (London: W. Owen, 1747), 23-24; Chrissochoidis, 779-80.

[36] The Gentleman’s Magazine 31 (1761): 472; Chrissochoidis, 780.

[37] [Paul] Whitehead, Honour.  A Satire (London [possibly Edinburgh]: M. Cooper, 1747), 15; Chrissochoidis, 780-81.