2013/2014

Fall: not teaching

Winter: EE141. Engineering Electromagnetics

I    Introduction to electromagnetism and Maxwell’s equation. A very basic introduction to vector calculus, Stokes and divergence theorem.   Maxwell’s equations in the static case: Electrostatics and magnetostatics. Electric and magnetic potentials. Electrostatics: Gauss’s law, Coulomb’s law, Faraday’s law for electrostatics . Magnetostatics:  Ampere’s law . Boundary conditions. Maxwell’s equations in the dynamic case: Electrodynamics . Wave equation . Electromagnetic waves . Phasors. Solutions of the wave equation (1D free space). Wavelength, wave-vector, forward and backward propagating plane waves . Solutions of the wave equation in 1D free space with boundary conditions – standing waves . Poynting’s theorem . Solutions of wave equation for various interesting problems: Electromagnetic resonators; Waveguides; Periodic media – photonic crystals.  Electromagnetics of transmission lines (1D electromagnetic wave propagation) .

Spring: EE136

EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

2012/2013

Fall: EE340. Optical micro- and nano-cavities (formerly known as: Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics). Optical micro- and nano-cavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

Winter: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class website 

Spring: sabbatical

2011/2012

 

Fall: sabbatical

Winter: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class website 

Spring: EE340. Optical micro- and nano-cavities (formerly known as: Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics). Optical micro- and nano-cavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

 

2008/2009, 2009/2010, and 2010/2011

Fall: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class website 

Winter: EE234.  Photonics laboratory. Photonics and fiber optics with a focus on communication and sensing. Experimental characterization of semiconductor lasers, optical fibers, photodetectors, receiver circuitry, fiber optic links, optical amplifiers, and optical sensors and photonic crystals. Prerequisite: EE 142 or equivalent.  

EE234 class website

Spring: EE340. Optical micro- and nano-cavities (formerly known as: Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics). Optical micro- and nano-cavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

 

2007/2008

Fall: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class web site 

Spring: EE340. Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics. This year's topic is optical microcavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

 

 

2006/2007

Fall: EE222/APPHYS222. Applied Quantum Mechanics I. Emphasis is on applications in modern devices and systems. Topics include: Schrödinger's equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, operator approach to quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, solutions of simple problems including quantum wells and tunneling. Quantum harmonic oscillator, annihilation and creation operators, coherent states. Two-particle states, entanglement, and Bell states. Quantum key distribution and teleportation. Calculation techniques including matrix diagonalization, perturbation theory, and variational method. Time-dependent perturbation theory, applications to optical absorption, nonlinear optical coefficients, and Fermi's golden rule. Methods for one-dimensional problems: transfer matrix method and WKB method. Quantum mechanics in crystalline materials. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 65 (or PHYSICS 45 and 47) and MATH 43, or by permission of the instructor. 3 units.

EE222 class web site 

Winter: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class web site 

Spring: EE340. Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics. This year's topic is optical microcavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

 

2005/2006

Fall: EE016N. (Freshman Seminar) From science fiction to science and engineering. Stanford Introductory Seminar. Preference to freshmen. A number of science and engineering topics will be discussed, while making references to their coverage in the science fiction literature and film. Topics could include nanotechnology, teleportation, solar sails, applications of lasers, various ideas related to computers and communications, etc. We may also discuss “bad science” in science fiction.  Prerequisites: high-school math and physics. 3 units. Vuckovic  

EE16 class website 

Winter: EE136.  Introduction to nanophotonics and nanostructures. Introduction to a number of interesting topics in nanophotonics and nanostructures and their applications. After a basic review of waves (electromagnetic and quantum mechanical) and semiconductors, we will discuss various approaches to confine these waves and devices employing such confinement.  Localization of light and applications: metallic mirrors, photonic crystals, optical waveguides, microresonators, plasmonics. Localization of quantum mechanical waves: quantum wells, wires and dots. Generation of light in semiconductors: spontaneous and stimulated emission, lasers, and light emitting diodes. Devices incorporating localization of both electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, such as resonant cavity quantum well lasers and microcavity-based single photon sources. System-level applications of the introduced concepts, such as optical communications, biochemical sensing, and quantum cryptography. Prerequisites: basic familiarity with electromagnetic and quantum mechanical waves, and semiconductors, at the level of EE41 or equivalent.  

EE136 class web site 

Spring: EE340. Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics. This year's topic is optical microcavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE340 class website 

 

Spring: APPPHYS483. Optics and Electronics Seminar. Current research topics in lasers, quantum electronics, optics, and photonics by faculty, students, and invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. 1unit. Instructor: Vuckovicc

 

AP483 website 

 

2003/2004 and 2004/2005

Fall: EE222/APPHYS222. Applied Quantum Mechanics I. Emphasis is on applications in modern devices and systems. Topics include: Schrödinger's equation, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, operator approach to quantum mechanics, Dirac notation, solutions of simple problems including quantum wells and tunneling. Quantum harmonic oscillator, annihilation and creation operators, coherent states. Two-particle states, entanglement, and Bell states. Quantum key distribution and teleportation. Calculation techniques including matrix diagonalization, perturbation theory, and variational method. Time-dependent perturbation theory, applications to optical absorption, nonlinear optical coefficients, and Fermi's golden rule. Methods for one-dimensional problems: transfer matrix method and WKB method. Quantum mechanics in crystalline materials. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 65 (or PHYSICS 45 and 47) and MATH 43, or by permission of the instructor. 3 units.

EE222 class web site 

Winter: EE223/APPHYS223/PHYSICS223. Applied Quantum Mechanics II. Continuation of 222, including more advanced topics: angular momentum in quantum mechanics, spin, hydrogen atom, systems of identical particles (bosons and fermions), quantum interference, introductory quantum optics (electromagnetic field quantization, Fock states, coherent states, squeezed states), fermion annihilation and creation operators, interaction of different kinds of particles, and other topics in electronics, optoelectronics, optics, and quantum information. Prerequisites: EE/APPHYS 222, or by permission of the instructor. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic

EE223 class web site 

Spring: EE340. Advanced topics in optics and quantum optics. This year's topic is optical microcavities and their device applications. Introduction to various types of optical microcavities (microdisks, microspheres, and photonic crystal cavities), their electromagnetic properties, design and fabrication techniques. Fundamentals of cavity quantum electrodynamics: strong and weak-coupling regime, Purcell factor, spontaneous emission control. Applications of optical microcavities, including low-threshold lasers, resonant cavity light emitting diodes, and single-photon sources. Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate or basic graduate level knowledge of electromagnetics, quantum mechanics, and physics of semiconductors. 3 units. Instructor: Vuckovic


EE340 class web site 

Homepage of Jelena Vuckovic

Homepage of the Quantum Photonics Lab