Biking through Glacier National Park

Mary Cameron

PhD Candidate
Atmosphere/Energy
Stanford University

Education

Research

Mary Cameron's research investigates the effects of aircraft exhaust on atmospheric composition. Aviation is an expanding industry, experiencing continued growth and playing an increasingly noticed role in air pollution and climate change. The standard method of modeling the effects of aviation on tropospheric/lower-stratospheric chemistry is to add such emissions to the background air at the model grid scale. Such treatment, however, places emissions into grid cells that can be several orders of magnitude larger in volume than an early aircraft plume, thus greatly diluting the emissions. Mary's research investigates the effects of solving aircraft gas-phase chemistry within an expanding plume versus solving it at the grid scale, in order to more accurately quantify its role in our changing atmosphere. Her current research examines the effects of aircraft emissions in the Arctic environment.

Posters and Publications

Paper. Cameron, M.A., M.Z. Jacobson, A.D. Naiman, and S.K. Lele (2013), Effects of plume-scale versus grid-scale treatment of aircraft exhaust photochemistry, Geophysical Research Letters, 40, 5815–5820. (PDF)

Poster. Cameron, M.A., M.Z. Jacobson, A.D. Naiman, and S.K. Lele, The photochemical effects of treating aircraft emissions from multiple flights at the subgrid scale, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, California, 9-13 December 2013. (PDF)

Poster. Cameron, M.A., M.Z. Jacobson, A.D. Naiman, and S.K. Lele, Modeling the effects of aircraft emissions on atmospheric photochemistry using layered plume dynamics, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, California, 3-7 December 2012.

Poster. Cameron, M.A., A.D. Naiman, M.Z. Jacobson, and S.K. Lele, Comparing the chemical effects of treating aviation gas emissions in an expanding plume versus at the grid scale, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, California, 5-9 December 2011.

Undergraduate Thesis. Cameron, M.A. and Davis, A.L., A mathematical model of angiogenesis in glioblastoma multiforme, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Arizona State University, May 2009 (PDF).

Oral Presentations

Seminar. Modeling aircraft emissions from multiple flights at the subgrid scale, Atmosphere/Energy Seminar, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, 19 November 2013.

Presentation. Studying the effects of aircraft exhaust on global and regional climate, FAA/PARTNER Meeting, Alexandria, Virginia, 16 October 2013 (connected remotely).

Seminar. Subgrid-scale treatment of aircraft emissions over the Arctic, Ph.D. Qualifying exam public seminar, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, 11 July 2013.

Presentation and Panel Discussion. Effects of aviation on atmospheric chemistry, Aviation Emissions Characterization Roadmap, 11th Meeting of Primary Contributors, Washington, DC, 14 May 2013 (connected remotely).

Presentation. Studying the effects of aircraft exhaust on global and regional climate, FAA/PARTNER Meeting, Costa Mesa, California, 27 February 2013 (connected remotely).

Presentation. Effects of plume versus grid-scale treatment of aircraft exhaust photochemistry, ACCRI Symposium, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 27 November 2012 (connected remotely).

Presentation. Examining the effects of aircraft emissions on contrails and global climate, FAA/PARTNER Meeting, Washington, D.C., 27 March 2012 (connected remotely).

Seminar. Subgrid plume modeling of chemical aviation emissions, Atmosphere/Energy Seminar, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, 1 November 2011.

Presentation. Analysis of a mathematical model of early brain tumor growth, SIAM Conference on Computational Science & Engineering, Miami, Florida, 5 March 2009.

Teaching

Teaching assistant at Stanford University for:

Personal

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