Instructions for Authors
  • MANUSCRIPTS. Manuscripts should be submitted to the editor, preferably as e-mail attachments. By mail or fax is also fine. Contact information:

Karen Rondestvedt, 1112 S. Delaware St., San Mateo, CA 94402-2142 USA  rondest@stanford.edu        fax: (650) 725-1068

It is not necessary to send material by registered mail [recommandé] to the U.S. However, if you feel more comfortable sending it by registered mail, please send it to my work address: Green Library - IASRG, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-6004 USA.

I will also be glad to discuss preliminary proposals with potential contributors.

  • ORIGINAL ARTICLES ONLY. Submission of a manuscript to this journal represents a certification on the part of the author(s) that it is an original work, and that neither this manuscript nor a version of it has been published elsewhere, nor is it being considered for publication elsewhere.
  • ACCEPTANCE FOR PUBLICATION. Upon acceptance of the manuscript for publication, you will be asked to send the editor a final, revised copy of the article in digital form.  It is strongly preferred that you use Microsoft Word for Windows for the text and send all files as e-mail attachments. If you cannot send the final version of your article as attachments, do not send it in text-only format in the body of the message; the result requires too much reformatting. Send disks or a CD by mail. If you send disks or a CD, please indicate on the labels: 1) the word-processing program you used, and the type of computer (PC or Macintosh); 2) the title of the article; and 3) your name. When the editor submits your article to the publisher, you will receive an e-mail that includes a request to send two forms related to copyright.  Print the forms from the e-mail, fill them out completely, sign them, and print your name.  The publisher needs signatures from all authors, on a single form or on multiple ones.  Fax or mail forms directly to the publisher: Taylor & Francis, 325 Chestnut Street, Suite 800, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA; or fax: 215-625-8563.
  • MANUSCRIPT LENGTH. Your manuscript may be approximately 5-50 typed pages, double-spaced (including references and abstract). Lengthier manuscripts may be considered but only at the the discretion of the editor. Lengthier manuscripts will be considered more favorably if they can be divided into sections for publication in successive issues. Typical peer-reviewed articles are 12-35 pages in length; column pieces tend to be shorter.
  • MANUSCRIPT STYLE. Submissions must be written in standard English. Non-Roman alphabet material should be transliterated in accordance with Library of Congress transliteration tables, without diacritics. Tables for many languages, including those written Cyrillic, can be found here: http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/roman.html.
    The general style of manuscripts for this journal should follow the 16th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style (online version available if you or your library subscribes). Examples of notes for many different types of material can be found at  http://www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/DocChicago.html. Notes and other references, if any, should be double-spaced and placed at the end of the paper.
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  • MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION. Please follow these specifications, whether you submit by mail or by e-mail.

    • Beginning of article should include, in addition to the title: (1) authors' names; (2) an abstract of about 100 words; (3) 3-10 key words for indexing purposes; (4) an introductory footnote containing authors' academic degrees, job titles, affiliations, mailing and e-mail addresses, and any desired acknowledgment of research support or other credit.
    • All text, including author footnote and endnotes, should be double-spaced.
    • Margins: Leave at least a one-inch margin on all four sides.
    • Pagination: Paginate the manuscript continuously in one section, ending with the last page of endnotes. Tables, figures, illustrations and the like should not be paginated.
    • Paper: If submitting by mail, use clean, white, 8-1/2 x 11" or A-4 paper.
    • Number of copies: 1
  • SPELLING, GRAMMAR, PUNCTUATION, ETC. You are responsible for preparing manuscript copy that is clearly written in standard, scholarly English. Authors whose native language is not English are strongly encouraged to have their manuscripts edited by a person experienced in writing for English-language professional journals. Articles should contain no errors of spelling, grammar or punctuation. Neither the editor nor the publisher will be responsible for correcting such errors, and manuscripts containing a large number of them will be returned unedited. In addition, please check the accuracy of all arithmetic calculations, statistics, numerical data, text citations, references and URLs.

    Please capitalize the word Internet. Include the proper diacritics for languages that are written in Roman alphabet. Do not use diacritics with transliterated text.

  • CONSISTENCY. Be sure you are consistent in your use of abbreviations and terminology, as well as in citing references, from one part of your paper to another.
  • REFERENCES. When an article, book, or report is cited, a superscript number should be placed at the end of the reference sentence, clause, or quotation. Number such citations sequentially as the paper continues, and list all references at the end of the article, numbered in the same order in which they are cited in the text. Use the form of the author's name that is on the article or the title page of book you are using; do not shorten all first names to just an initial. Use the short-title form for subsequent references, not ibid. The reference section, like the text, should be double-spaced throughout. It should conform to the style below. (Note that some details have changed since the publication of the 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style.)

    1. John W. Graham, "Special Issues: What, When and How," The Serials Librarian 27, no. 4 (1995): 53.

      Josette Anne Lyders, Journal and Newspaper Editing (Englewood, Colo.: Libraries Unlimited, 1993), 79.

      Glenn Farrell, "The Development of Virtual Education: A Global Perspective," Commonwealth of Learning (1999), http://www.col.org/virtualed/index.htm.

      Bahá’ís of the United States, "History," The Bahá’í Faith, http://www.us.bahai.org/history/index.html.

      Encyclopedia Britannica Online, s.v. "Sibelius, Jean," http://search.eb.com/bol/topic?eu=69347&sctn=1.

      Beth Daley, "A Tale of a Whale: Scientists, Museum Are Eager to Study, Display Rare Creature," Boston Globe, June 11, 2002, third edition, http://www.lexis-nexis.com/.

      Graham, "Special Issues," 59.

      Farrell, "The Development of Virtual Education."

      Bahá’ís of the United States, "History."

  • Do not abbreviate journal titles. Include both volume and issue number, issue date and inclusive pagination of journal articles. Consult The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed., Chapter 14, for further information on references. This journal generally does not use the author-date system for references.
  • ALTERATIONS REQUIRED BY REFEREES AND REVIEWERS. Many times a paper is accepted by the editor contingent upon changes that are mandated by anonymous specialist referees and members of the editorial board. If the editor asks you to revise your manuscript, you are responsible for doing so.
  • ACCEPTANCE FOR PUBLICATION. Upon acceptance of the manuscript for publication, you will be asked to send the editor a final, revised copy of the article, either on-disk or as one or more e-mail attachments. If you send a disk, please indicate on the label: 1) the word-processing program you used, and the type of computer (PC or Macintosh); 2) the title of the article; and 3) your name. If you send an e-mail attachment, please indicate in the accompanying message the word-processing program you used, and the type of computer.

    If you cannot send the final version of your article as an attachment, do not send it in text-only format in the body of the message; the result requires too much reformatting. Send a disk by mail.

  • TYPESETTING. The publisher will ask you to review galley proofs of your article online. No editorial revisions can be made at that point. Editorial revisions, if any, must be made before your article is submitted for publication. Typesetting errors will generally be corrected by the production staff of Taylor & Francis, but authors are expected to submit manuscripts, machine-readable files and art that are free from error.  Please assume that production staff do not know languages other than English.

  • Column pieces are generally reviewed only by the column editor, and can be submitted a month later unless that editor specifies otherwise.

     

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