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Bulletin Archive

This archived information is dated to the 2008-09 academic year only and may no longer be current.

For currently applicable policies and information, see the current Stanford Bulletin.

Graduate courses in Music

Primarily for graduate students; undergraduates may enroll with consent of instructor.

MUSIC 200. Graduate Proseminar

Required of first-year graduate students in music. Introduction to research in music, bibliographical materials, major issues in the field, philosophy, and methods in music history. Guest lecturers and individual research topics.

4 units, Aut (Berger, K; McBride, J)

MUSIC 220A. Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound

Techniques for digital sound synthesis, effects, and reverberation. Topics: summary of digital synthesis techniques (additive, subtractive, nonlinear, wavetable, spectral-modeling, and physical-modeling); digital effects algorithms (phasing, flanging, chorus, pitch-shifting, and vocoding); and techniques for digital reverberation. Majors (undergraduate or graduate) must take for 4 units. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.

2-4 units, Aut (Wang, G)

MUSIC 220B. Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Spatial Processing

The use of high-level programming language as a compositional aid in creating musical structures. Advanced study of sound synthesis techniques. Simulation of a reverberant space and control of the position of sound within the space. Majors (undergraduate or graduate) must take for 4 units. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. Prerequisite: 220A.

2-4 units, Win (Wang, G)

MUSIC 220C. Research Seminar in Computer-Generated Music

Individual projects in composition, psychoacoustics, or signal processing. Majors (undergraduate or graduate) must take for 4 units. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 220B.

2-4 units, Spr (Caceres, J)

MUSIC 220D. Research in Computer-Generated Music

Independent research projects in composition, psychoacoustics, or signal processing. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 220C.

1-10 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 221. Topics in the History of Theory

The intersection of music theory and compositional practice in different eras of Western music history. Primary sources in music theory and issues such as notation, rhythm, mode, dissonance treatment, counterpoint, tonality, form, rhetoric, affect and imitation, expression, linear analysis, 12-tone and set theory, in light of relevant repertoire and modern scholarship. May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.

3-5 units, alternate years, not given this year

MUSIC 230. Advanced Orchestral Conducting

May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times. Prerequisite: 130B.

2-4 units, Aut (Cai, J), Win (Cai, J), Spr (Cai, J)

MUSIC 231. Advanced Choral Conducting

May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times. Prerequisite: 130C.

2-4 units, Aut (Sano, S), Win (Sano, S), Spr (Sano, S)

MUSIC 240. Studies in Medieval Music

(Same as MUSIC 140.) May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23

3-4 units, alternate years, not given this year

MUSIC 241. Studies in Renaissance Music

(Same as MUSIC 141.) May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23.

3-4 units, not given this year

MUSIC 242. Studies in Baroque Music

(Same as MUSIC 142.) May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23.

3-4 units, not given this year

MUSIC 243. Studies in Classic Music

(Same as MUSIC 143.) May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23.

3-4 units, Spr (Hadlock, H)

MUSIC 244. Studies in Romantic Music

(Same as MUSIC 144.) May be repeated for credit. Pre or corequisite: 23.

3-4 units, not given this year

MUSIC 245. Studies in Modern Music

(Same as MUSIC 145.) May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23.

3-4 units, not given this year

MUSIC 249. Reactions to the Record: Early Recordings, Lost Styles, and Music's Future

(Same as MUSIC 149.) Seminar. The transformation of musical style, audience expectations, the composer-performer relationship, and the musical score from the late 1800s to the present. Sources include: recordings from Stanford's Archive of Recorded Sound; recordings of (Brahms, Debussy, Rachmaninoff, Saint-SaŽns, Prokofiev, Bartůk; concert programs; interviews; and reviews. Readings include Hamilton's After the Golden Age and Philip's Performing Music in the Age of Recording. Emphasis is on voice, strings, piano, chamber music, and orchestra. Guest residencies in conjunction with January 2009 symposium; see http://music.stanford.edu/Events/StanfordMusicSymposium/. May be repeated for credit. Pre- or corequisite: 23 or consent of instructor.

3-4 units, Aut (Barth, G; Arul, K)

MUSIC 250A. HCI Theory and Practice

HCI issues as they relate to music applications in composition and performance. Project-oriented, examining issues from the technical and theoretical perspectives of computer science, haptics, and music theory. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.

3-4 units, Aut (Ju, W)

MUSIC 250B. HCI Performance Systems

Continuation of 250A, concentrating on interactive computer-music performance systems. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/250b/. Prerequisite: 250A.

1-4 units, Win (Ju, W)

MUSIC 251. Music, the Brain, and Human Behavior

The perception, cognition, and neuroscience of music. Prerequisite: MUSIC 151 or consent of instructors.

1-5 units, Win (Berger, J; Menon, V)

MUSIC 253. Musical Information: An Introduction

The kinds of musical information used in sound, graphical, and analytical applications. Emphasis is on independent concepts and principles in music representation and research objectives (repertory analysis, performance analysis, theoretical models, similarity, and stylistic simulation). Examples from Western art music. Prerequisites: one year of music theory or equivalent; methods courses in fields such as musical analysis, symbolic systems, information processing, sound engineering, or intellectual property issues.

1-4 units, Win (Selfridge-Field, E)

MUSIC 254. Applications of Musical Information: Query, Analysis, and Style Simulation

Participants explore the issues introduced in 253 in greater depth and take initiative for research projects related to a theoretical or methodological issue, a software project, or a significant analytical result. Prerequisite: 253 or consent of instructor.

1-4 units, Spr (Selfridge-Field, E)

MUSIC 256. Music, Computing, and Design

Topics include interactive software system design for computer music, implementation strategies and best practices, software interface design and visualization, and real-time audio systems. Open-source, software re-use, and the intersection of audio and graphics. Crafting software systems for computer music and multimedia. Programming projects in C++ and the ChucK programming language. Prerequisite: a programming course in C++/Java or equivalent experience. May be repeated once for credit.

1-4 units, Aut (Wang, G)

MUSIC 269A. Seminar in Performance Practices

(Same as MUSIC 169A.) Performance techniques, theoretical principles, aesthetics, and musical resources of various historical periods.

1-4 units, alternate years, not given this year

MUSIC 269B. Research in Performance Practices

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.

1-5 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 272A. Advanced Piano

Private lessons and group masterclass weekly. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 272B. Advanced Organ

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Morgan, R), Win (Morgan, R), Spr (Morgan, R)

MUSIC 272C. Advanced Harpsichord

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Thornburgh, E), Win (Thornburgh, E), Spr (Thornburgh, E)

MUSIC 272D. Advanced Jazz Piano

By invitation only; priority to majors and jazz-ensemble participants. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Low, M), Win (Low, M), Spr (Low, M)

MUSIC 272E. Advanced Fortepiano

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Barth, G), Win (Barth, G), Spr (Barth, G)

MUSIC 272F. Advanced Carillon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Zerlang, T), Win (Zerlang, T), Spr (Zerlang, T)

MUSIC 273. Advanced Voice

May be repeated for credit.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 274A. Advanced Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 274B. Advanced Viola

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 274C. Advanced Violoncello

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 274D. Advanced Contrabass

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Moyer, B), Win (Moyer, B), Spr (Moyer, B)

MUSIC 274E. Advanced Viola da Gamba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Dornenburg, J), Win (Dornenburg, J), Spr (Dornenburg, J)

MUSIC 274F. Advanced Classical Guitar

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Ferguson, C), Win (Ferguson, C), Spr (Ferguson, C)

MUSIC 274G. Advanced Harp

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Chauvel, M), Win (Chauvel, M), Spr (Chauvel, M)

MUSIC 274H. Advanced Baroque Violin

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Martin, A), Win (Martin, A), Spr (Martin, A)

MUSIC 274I. Early Plucked Strings

(Same as MUSIC 174I.)

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 275A. Advanced Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 275B. Advanced Oboe

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Hubbard, R), Win (Matheson, J), Spr (Matheson, J)

MUSIC 275C. Advanced Clarinet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 275D. Advanced Bassoon

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Olivier, R), Win (Olivier, R), Spr (Olivier, R)

MUSIC 275E. Advanced Recorder/Renaissance Wind Instruments

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Myers, H), Win (Myers, H), Spr (Myers, H)

MUSIC 275F. Advanced Saxophone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 275G. Advanced Baroque Flute

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 276A. Advanced French Horn

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Ragent, L), Win (Ragent, L), Spr (Ragent, L)

MUSIC 276B. Advanced Trumpet

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff)

MUSIC 276C. Advanced Trombone

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Kenley, M), Win (Kenley, M), Spr (Kenley, M)

MUSIC 276D. Advanced Tuba

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Clements, A), Win (Clements, A), Spr (Clements, A)

MUSIC 277. Advanced Percussion

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Veregge, M), Win (Veregge, M), Spr (Veregge, M)

MUSIC 280. TA Training Course

Required for doctoral students serving as teaching assistants. Orientation to resources at Stanford, guest presentations on the principles of common teaching activities, supervised teaching experience. Students who entered in the Autumn should take 280 in the Spring prior to the Autumn they begin teaching.

1 unit, Spr (Ruviaro, B; Heel, K)

MUSIC 300A. Medieval Notation

Western notation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance: principles, purposes, and transcription.

4 units, alternate years, not given this year

MUSIC 300B. Renaissance Notation

Western notation of the Middle Ages and Renaissance: principles, purposes, and transcription.

4 units, Aut (Mahrt, W), alternate years, not given next year

MUSIC 301A. Analysis of Music: Modal

4 units, Win (Mahrt, W)

MUSIC 301B. Analysis of Music: Tonal

4 units, Aut (Grey, T)

MUSIC 301C. Analysis of Music: Post-Tonal

Current analytical trends, issues, and methods.

4 units, Spr (Ulman, E)

MUSIC 302. Research in Musicology

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 7 times.

1-5 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 310. Research Seminar in Musicology

For graduate students. Topics vary each quarter. May be repeated for credit a total of 8 times.

3-5 units, Aut (Kronengold, C), Win (Rodin, J), Spr (Mahrt, W)

MUSIC 312A. Aesthetics and Criticism of Music, Ancients and Moderns: Plato to Nietzsche

For graduate students. Primary texts focusing on the nature, purposes, and uses of music and other arts.

4 units, Win (Berger, K), alternate years, not given next year

MUSIC 312B. Aesthetics and Criticism of Music, Contemporaries: Heidegger to Today

For graduate students. Primary texts focusing on the nature, purposes, and uses of music and other arts.

4 units, Spr (Berger, K), alternate years, not given next year

MUSIC 318. Advanced Acoustics

Current topics. May be repeated for credit.

1-5 units, Win (Rossing, T)

MUSIC 319. Research Seminar on Computational Models of Sound Perception

All aspects of auditory perception, often with emphasis on computational models. Topics: music perception, signal processing, auditory models, pitch perception, speech, binaural hearing, auditory scene analysis, basic psychoacoustics, and neurophysiology. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

1-3 units, Aut (Slaney, M), Win (Slaney, M), Spr (Slaney, M)

MUSIC 320. Introduction to Digital Audio Signal Processing

Digital signal processing for music and audio research. Topics: complex numbers, sinusoids, spectrum representation, sampling and aliasing, digital filters, frequency response, z transforms, transfer-function analysis, and associated Matlab software. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/320/.

3-4 units, Aut (Abel, J; Berners, D)

MUSIC 321. Readings in Music Theory

Directed reading and research. May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.

1-5 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 323. Doctoral Seminar in Composition

Illustrated discussions of compositional issues and techniques. Students present their own work to the class, and individually to the instructor. May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times.

4 units, Aut (Applebaum, M), Win (Berger, J), Spr (Kapuscinski, J)

MUSIC 325. Individual Graduate Projects in Composition

May be repeated for credit.

1-5 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 341. Ph.D Dissertation

May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.

1-10 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 390. Practicum Internship

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.

1 unit, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 399. D.M.A. Final Project

May be repeated for credit a total of 5 times.

1-10 units, Aut (Staff), Win (Staff), Spr (Staff), Sum (Staff)

MUSIC 420. Signal Processing Models in Musical Acoustics

Computational methods in musical sound synthesis and digital audio effects based on acoustic physical models. Topics: acoustic simulation with delay lines, digital filters, and nonlinear elements; comb filters; allpass filters; artificial reverberation; delay-line interpolation and sampling-rate conversion; phasing, flanging, and chorus effects; efficient computational models of strings, woodwinds, brasses, and other musical instruments. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/420/. Prerequisites: 320 or equivalent; PHYSICS 21 or equivalent course applying Newton's laws of motion; and CS 106B or equivalent programming in C and C++.

3-4 units, Win (Smith, J)

MUSIC 421. Audio Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)

Spectrum analysis and signal processing using the FFT with emphasis on audio applications. Topics: Fourier theorems; FFT windows; spectrum analysis; spectrograms; sinusoidal modeling; spectral modeling synthesis; FFT convolution; FIR filter design and system identification; overlap-add and filter-bank-summation methods for short-time Fourier analysis, modification, and resynthesis. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/421/. Prerequisites: 420 or consent of instructor.

3-4 units, Spr (Smith, J)

MUSIC 422. Perceptual Audio Coding

History and basic principles: development of psychoacoustics-based data-compression techniques; perceptual-audio-coder applications (radio, television, film, multimedia/internet audio, DVD, EMD). In-class demonstrations: state-of-the-art audio coder implementations (such as AC-3, MPEG) at varying data rates; programming simple coders. Topics: audio signals representation; quantization; time to frequency mapping; introduction to psychoacoustics; bit allocation and basic building blocks of an audio codec; perceptual audio codecs evaluation; overview of MPEG-1, 2, 4 audio coding and other coding standards (such asAC-3). Prerequisites: knowledge of digital audio principles, familiarity with C programming. Recommended: 320, EE 261. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/.

3 units, Win (Bosi-Goldberg, M)

MUSIC 423. Signal Processing Research

Graduate research seminar. Problems in music and/or audio signal processing. Presentation of research-in-progress by graduate students, visiting scholars, and CCRMA faculty. See http://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/423/. May be repeated for credit a total of 11 times.

1-4 units, Aut (Abel, J; Berners, D), Win (Smith, J), Spr (Smith, J)

MUSIC 424. Signal Processing Techniques for Digital Audio Effects

Techniques for dynamic range compression, reverberation, equalization and filtering, panning and spatialization, digital emulation of analog processors, and implementation of time-varying effects. Single-band and multiband compressors, limiters, noise gates, de-essers, convolutional reverberators, parametric and linear-phase equalizers, wah-wah and envelope-following filters, and the Leslie. Students develop effects algorithms of their own design in labs. Prerequisites: digital signal processing, sampling theorem, digital filtering, and the Fourier transform at the level of 320 or EE 261; Matlab and modest C programming experience. Recommended: 420 or EE 264; audio effects in mixing and mastering at the level of 192.

3-4 units, Spr (Berners, D; Abel, J)

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