Symmetry, STS, Archaeology (Part 2)

. . .continued from Part 1 of 2. Temporality The ethnographic examination of archaeological practice has become an established sub-domain (Edgeworth 2006, 2010; Yarrow 2003), although this reflexive platform has not developed in explicit contact with STS ethnographies of science (Knorr-Cetina and Mulkay 1983; Latour and Woolgar 1986; Lynch 1985). The characterization of scientific activity…

Time, Material Memory, and Public Sites: Part Two

Last week, I discussed time and how it relates to public sites, most especially churches. At churches, material memory takes the form of gravestones, architectural fabric, and the props of religious worship. To begin to think about these issues at St. Peter’s church let us consider the gravestones in the churchyard. Figure One: Sinking Stone…

Time, Material Memory, and Public Sites: Part One

Figure One. St Peter’s church Southern Façade (Image: Author) In this two-part piece I want to think about time and how it relates to public sites. In Part One I will discuss time and how it relates to public sites, and in Part Two I will contextualize these ideas through my work at St. Peter’s…

A Review of: Archaeologies of Placemaking: Monuments, memories and engagement in Native North America. Edited by Patricia Rubertone, One World Archaeology Series 59. Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press, 2009.

Archaeologies of Placemaking is the outcome of a WAC-5 session at Washington, D.C. in 2003. The following review of this volume is divided into two parts. The first part provides a summary of the nine chapters, and the second offers critical commentary on its content. Archaeologies of Placemaking contains an introduction and eight case studies…

The Earth After Us

Ever wondered what will survive, millions of years hence, of our railway networks, skyscrapers, motorways and rubbish dumps? What about trains and cars, or smaller artefacts like mobile phones and ballpoint pens? Such are the questions which the book poses. In this review of The Earth After Us by Jan Zalasiewicz I consider briefly some of the implications this book has for contemporary archaeology.