May 11-13, 2007
Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA)
CCRMA Stage: The Knoll
660 Lomita Drive
Stanford, CA

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SYMPOSIUM PARTICIPANTS

RESEARCH AND LINKS

TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATIONS

DIRECTIONS TO CCRMA AND SLAC

REGISTRATION

CONTACTS

2006 MUSIC AND BRAIN SYMPOSIUM


DISCUSSION FORUM


MAY 11TH EVENTS @ UCDAVIS


Judith Becker, Ph.D.

Jonathan Berger, Ph.D.

Thomas Budzynski, Ph.D.

Thomas F. Collura, Ph.D., P.E

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Ph.D.

Gamo Da Paz

Peter Desain, Ph.D.

Sridhar Devarajan

Robert Gatchel, Ph.D., ABPP

Aleta Hayes

William B. Hurlbut, M.D.

Stanford Hwimori

Petr Janata, Ph.D.

James Lane, Ph.D.

Edward W. Large, Ph.D.

Dan Levitin, Ph.D.

Scott Makeig, Ph.D.

Vinod Menon, Ph.D.

Harold Russell, Ph.D.

Rebecca Schaefer, M.S.

Dave Siever, C.E.T.

Matt Wright

The SICA Center for Arts, Science, and Technology's Symposium on Music, Rhythm and the Brain will present current research on the physiological and psychophysical effects of musical rhythm. Understanding the neuroscience of rhythm is key to understanding the centrality of music in ritual, dance, and other aspects of human behavior and human consciousness. Advances in research on the effects of musical rhythm on the regulation of brain functioning may lead to significant therapeutic applications. Scholars from the fields of music theory, music cognition, psychology, neuroscience, medicine, and anthropology will come together to present and discuss the convergence of these fields.

The Symposium is held in collaboration with Rhythmic Music and the Regulation of Brain Function - at The Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, Davis.

Format

The Stanford Symposium will commence on Friday evening with a keynote address by Daniel Levitin, author of the recent bestseller, This is Your Brain on Music. This presentation, to be held in the Clark Center Auditorium at 7:30PM is open to the general public and no tickets or registration is required.

The weekend sessions will focus on the relationship between rhythmic music and states of meditation, flow, and trance. Work on rhythmic auditory stimulation for the treatment of ADD, anxiety, depression, and dementia will also be reviewed. Day two will focus on state of the art approaches to understanding how the brain imagines, categorizes and responds to music structures from theoretical, experimental and clinical perspectives.

The symposium will combine presentations, panel discussions, and musical and dance performances, with time for discussion among the participants. All Saturday and Sunday sessions and performances will take place at Stanford's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA).

Registration

Registration for the symposium is required, but there is no fee for attendance. Please fill out our Online Registration Form. For your own records, you may wish to print out your registration information.

CAST Advisory committee

Jonathan Berger, Associate Professor, Music
Christopher Chafe, Professor, Music
John C. Chowning, Professor, Music (Emeritus)
William Hurlbut, Consulting Professor, Neurology
Clete Kushida, Associate Professor, Psychiatry
Vinod Menon, Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Eleanor Selfridge-Field, Consulting Professor, Music
David Spiegel, Professor, Psychiatry
Patrick Suppes, Professor, Philosophy (Emeritus)

Conference organizing committee

Jonathan Berger, Co-Director, SICA
Michael Gubman, Stanford Lively Arts
Gabe Turow, CCRMA

Funded in part by the Drs. Ben and A. Jess Shenson Fund, and from the Office of the President.
The symposium is co-sponsored by the Department of Music, and the School of Medicine.