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Theoretical Aspects of Kashaya Phonology and
  Morphology cover

Theoretical Aspects of Kashaya Phonology and Morphology

Eugene Buckley

This study discusses a wide range of phonological and morphological phenomena in Kashaya, a Pomoan language of northern California, and considers their implications for current theories of generative grammar. Issues raised in feature theory include the single-segment status of glottalized and aspirited sonorants, the consonantal nature of glides, the manipulation of laryngeal features, the loss of place features through dissimilation and coda interactions, and vowel harmony. Prosodic analysis supports the licensing. of segments by the mora, a limitedform of final consonant extraprosidicity, and the use of prespecified moraic structure to encode exceptionality. The complex stress system gives evidence that extrametricality is persistent (from early in the lexicon to the postlexical component), and cumulative (present simultaneously on a syllable and foot at the left edge of the stress domain). An overall organization of the lexicon into five levels is posited. Numerous morphological patterns are also discussed, including complex rules of allomorphy, as well as the nature of templates, reduplication, and compounding.

Eugene Buckley is assistant professor of linguistics at the University of Pennsylvania.

Contents

  • Preface
  • 1 Introduction
    • 1.1 Theoretical Assumptions
    • 1.2 Background and Previous Work
    • 1.3 Notation and Abbreviations

  • 2 Segmental Representations
    • 2.1 Segment Inventory
    • 2.2 Underlying Representations
      • 2.2.1 Feature Geometry
      • 2.2.2 Consonant Underspecification: Place Features
      • 2.2.3 Consonant Underspecification: Manner Features
      • 2.2.4 Vowel Underspecification
    • 2.3 Glottalized and Aspirated Sonorants
      • 2.3.1 General Considerations
      • 2.3.2 Phonological Evidence
    • 2.4 The Status of Glides

  • 3 Segmental Processes
    • 3.1 Rules Targeting Laryngeal Features
      • 3.1.1 Glottal Merger
      • 3.1.2 Onset Simplification
      • 3.1.3 Desonorization
      • 3.1.4 Glottal Transfer
      • 3.1.5 Aspirate Dissimilation
      • 3.1.6 Cluster Deaspiration
      • 3.1.7 Coda Asperation
    • 3.2 Place Node Delinking
      • 3.2.1 Coronal Debuccalization
      • 3.2.2 Uvular Debuccalization
      • 3.2.3 Debuccalization of Word-Final Stops
    • 3.3 Vowel-Consonant Interactions
      • 3.3.1 The Epenthetic Vowel
      • 3.3.2 Uvular Assimilation
      • 3.3.3 [+back] Insertion
      • 3.3.4 [+round] Insertion
      • 3.3.5 Uvular Raising
      • 3.3.6 /e/Raising
    • 3.4 Vowel Harmony
      • 3.4.1 Translaryngeal Harmony
      • 3.4.2 Height Harmony
    • 3.5 Other Rules
      • 3.5.1 Sonorization
      • 3.5.2 Palatalization
      • 3.5.3 Gemination
    • 3.6 Summary

  • 4 Constraint-Triggered Rules
    • 4.1 Review of Rules
    • 4.2 Background
      • 4.2.1 Previous Approaches
      • 4.2.2 Assumptions
    • 4.3 Application to the Kashaya Data
      • 4.3.1 Place Delinking
      • 4.3.2 Laryngeal Delinking
      • 4.3.3 Sonorization
      • 4.3.3 Addition of Laryngeal Features
    • 4.4 Conclusion

  • 5 Metrical Phonology
    • 5.1 Basic Prosody
    • 5.2 Persistence
      • 5.2.1 Extrametricality of Initial Syllables
      • 5.2.2 Persistence to the Postlexical Component
      • 5.2.3 Theoretical Considerations
    • 5.3 The Special Status of Long Vowels
      • 5.3.1 Foot Flipping and Stess Shift
      • 5.3.2 Stress Shift Alone
    • 5.4 Summary
    • 5.5 Analysis
      • 5.5.1 Level Ordering
      • 5.5.2 Creation of an Anti-Iamb
      • 5.5.3 Stress Shift as Extrameticality
      • 5.5.4 Foot Flipping as a Rule
      • 5.5.5 Stress Shift, Literally?
    • 5.6 Cumulavity and Peripherality
    • 5.7 Further Issues
      • 5.7.1 Presuffixal Lengthening
      • 5.7.2 ‘Blocking’ of Syllable Extrametricality

  • 6 Mora and Syllable Structure
    • 6.1 Basic Prosodic Structure
      • 6.1.1 Morification
      • 6.1.2 Syllabification
      • 6.1.3 Exceptional Superheavy Syllables
  • 6.2 Close-Syllable Shortening
  • 6.3 Final-Consonant Extraprosodicity
    • 6.3.1 Epenthesis
    • 6.3.2 Distribution of Superheavy Syllables
    • 6.3.3 Shotening in Word-Final CVVC
    • 6.3.4 Sensitivity to Extraprosodicity
    • 6.3.5 Resyllabification
  • 6.4 Laryngeal Increments
    • 6.4.1 The Phenomenon
    • 6.4.2 Represebtations
    • 6.4.3 Resyllabification
  • 6.5 The Decrement
    • 6.5.1 Examples
    • 6.5.2 The Form of the Rule
    • 6.5.3 Blocking of the Decrement
  • 6.6 Elision
  • 6.7 Glide Deletion
  • 6.8 Morphological Shortening

  • 7 Organization of the Phonology and Morphology
    • 7.1 Traditional Position Classes
    • 7.2 An Analysis in Terms of Levels
      • 7.2.1 Prefixes
      • 7.2.2 The Inner Group Suffixes
      • 7.2.3 The Middle Group Suffixes
      • 7.2.4 The Outer Group Suffixes
    • 7.3 Level Ordering

  • 8 Morphological Details
    • 8.1 Template Morphology
    • 8.2 Infixation
    • 8.3 Reduplication
      • 8.3.1 CV Reduplication
      • 8.3.2 Stem Reduplication
    • 8.4 Aphesis
    • 8.5 Compounding
    • 8.6 The Kinship System

  • 9 Conclusions
  • Appendix
    List of Verb Suffixes
    References

    12/10/93

    ISBN (Paperback): 188152602X (9781881526025)
    ISBN (Cloth): 1881526038 (9781881526032)

    Subject: Linguistics; Kashaya Language--Phonology; Kashaya Language--Morphology

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