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Context and Binding in Japanese cover

Context and Binding in Japanese

Masayo Iida

In this book, Masayo Iida investigates the proper treatment of zibun-binding, reviewing the status of the syntactic subjecthood condition, She proposes a conjunctive theory of zibun-binding in which both a syntactic condition and a nonsyntactic condition apply to every instance of zibun-binding. This approach is contrasted with a disjunctive approach adopted in many theories of zibun-binding, which views the subjecthood condition as a fundemental licensing condition to account for nonsubject binding, when syntactic condition would be violated.

Observing the fact that zibun-binding is affected by or interacts with various kinds of discourse information, and that the syntactic subjecthood condition does not impose its constraint independently, contrary to expectation, Iida claims that zibun-binding should be captured by a conjunctive theory, where the syntactic constraint minimally refers to a coargument relation between zibun and its antecedent, but not to subjecthood, while the discourse factor of zibun-binding is identified, inspired by previously proposed factors, which are all related and often presented under the general term “point of view”. The discourse notion of deictic perspective.

The interpretation of so-called ‘zero-pronouns’ is also discussed. Like zibun-binding, zero pronoun binding is affected by a discourse factor, in this case attentional focus. The conjunctive approach in which a syntactic condition is minimally stated is also shown to be adequate in accounting for the interaction of syntax and discourse in zero pronoun binding

The approach of this book is supported by the uncontroversial assumption that syntactic binding ought to be available whenever the syntactic condition is met. Iida concludes that it is more plausable to think of grammar as providing some definite constraints, and what discourse factors do is apply disjunctively or conjunctively with respect to those constraints. Violation of any constraint, syntactic or discourse-based, will lead to unacceptability which cannot be “repaired” by another component

Masayo Iida was a senior research scientist at Fujitsu Software Corporation at the time of this publication.

Contents

  • Preface
  • Acknowledgements
  • Abbreviations
  • 1 Introduction
    • 1.1 Zibun-Binding
    • 1.2 Semantic Notions for Zibun-Binding
    • 1.3 Two Different Approaches to Anaphoric Binding

  • 2 Zibun Binding in Previous Studies
    • 2.1 Syntactic Approaches
      • 2.1.1 Subjecthood Condition
      • 2.1.2 Analysis in Government and Binding Theory
    • 2.2 Semantic Approaches
      • 2.2.1 Reportive vs. Nonreportive Style
      • 2.2.2 Direct-Discourse Analysis
      • 2.2.3 Empathy
      • 2.2.4 Logophoricity
      • 2.2.5 Dissection of Logophoricity: Source, Self, Pivot
      • 2.2.6 Point of View
      • 2.2.7 Semantic Role Hierarchy
    • 2.3 Summary

  • 3 Disjunctive Theory of Zibun-Binding
    • 3.1 Disjunctive Theory of Zibun-Binding
      • 3.1.1 Gunji's Syntactic and Discourse Controls
      • 3.1.2 Kameyama's [+sb/+log] Binding
    • 3.2 Problems with Disjunctive Theory
      • 3.2.1 Multiple Zibun-Binding
      • 3.2.2 Interaction with Deictic Expressions
      • 3.2.3 The Dilemma of the Subjecthood Condition
    • 3.3 Summary

  • 4 Toward a Unified Theory of Zibun-Binding
    • 4.1 A Syntactic Constraint in Zibun-Binding
      • 4.1.1 A Minimal Syntactic Constraint
      • 4.1.2 Commanding Relations
      • 4.1.3 The Syntactic Nature of the Constraint
    • 4.2 A Conjunctive Theory Zibun-Binding
      • 4.2.1 Speaker's Deictic Perspective as a Discourse Factor
      • 4.2.2 Subject-Binding and Speaker'Deictic Perspective
      • 4.2.3 The Problems Revisited
    • 4.3 Reflexive Binding in Other Languages
      • 4.3.1 Disjunctive Bindings
      • 4.3.2 Conjunctive Bindings
      • 4.3.3 The Problems Revisited
    • 4.4 Summary

  • 5 The Perspectival Nature of Zibun-Binding
    • 5.1 First Use of Zibun and Logophoricity
      • 5.1.1 Zibun-Binding to the Speaker
      • 5.1.2 Zibun-Binding in a Pure Logophoric Domain
    • 5.2 A Discourse Theory of Zibun-Binding
      • 5.2.1 The Nature of Zibun
      • 5.2.2 Perspectivity in Context
      • 5.2.3 The Relation between Zibunand Deictric Perspective
      • 5.2.4 Perspective Possibilities
      • 5.2.5 Speaker's Identification and Nonsubject Zibun-Binding
      • 5.2.6 Related Accounts on Perspective in Zibun-Binding
    • 5.3 Perspective Account for Various Zibun-Binding Phenomena
      • 5.3.1 Subjecthood
      • 5.3.2 Deitric Motion Verbs
      • 5.3.3 Psych-verbs
      • 5.3.4 Lexical Causitives
      • 5.3.5 Copula Constructions
    • 5.4 Summary

  • 6 Formal Representation of Zibun-Binding
    • 6.1 Head-Driven Phrase Structure Grammar
    • 6.2 Semantic Framework
    • 6.3 Zibun-Binding Mechanisms
    • 6.4 Context and Content
      • 6.4.1 Discourse Representation Theory
      • 6.4.2 Content and Context in HPSG Semantics
    • 6.5 Long Distance Zibun-Binding Phenomena
      • 6.5.1 Basic Facts
      • 6.5.2 Integration of Contextual Information
      • 6.5.3 Intersentential Zibun-Binding
    • 6.6 Summary

  • 7 Constraints on Zero Pronouns
    • 7.1 Zero Pronoun Building Phenomena
    • 7.2 Previous Syntactic Analysis
      • 7.2.1 Subject-Object Asymmetry
      • 7.2.2 Analyses in Government Binding Theory
    • 7.3 A New Approach toward the Resolution of Zero Pronouns
      • 7.3.1 Minimal Syntactic Constraint
      • 7.3.2 Interface of Syntax and Discourse
      • 7.3.3 Formal Representation
      • 7.3.4 Empty Constraint
    • 7.4 Summary

  • 8 Conclusions and Implications
    • 8.1 Conclusions
    • 8.2 Implications

  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index

10/1/95

ISBN (Paperback): 1881526747 (9781881526742)
ISBN (Cloth): 9781881526759

Subject: Linguistics; Japanese Language--Anaphora; Japanese Language--Grammar

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