Michael Flynn

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Contact

  • Product Realization lab
    Stanford University
    447 Santa Teresa Street
    Stanford, CA 94305-2232
  • flynn@stanford.edu

About

Hello! I am a PhD student in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. My academic interest lie at the intersection of mechanical engineering and education. Within mechanical engineering, I'm most passionate about mechanical design, design for manufacture, and solid mechanics. Within the domain of education, I'm most drawn to curriculum development and educational psychology. For my dissertation, I would like to explore how different types of problems mechanical engineering students solve as practice impact what they learn (content), how they learn (process), their ability to transfer these experiences (application) and how they view themselves (identity). Specifically, I would like to unpack the role of open-ended and/or ambiguous mechanical engineering school work in its relation to transfer.


In addition to my role as a student I also have had a number of amazing opportunities to teach. This year I am involved with three classes at Stanford: (1)I developed the curriculum for and teach ME181 "Deliverables", a course where students solve representative industry design challenges using modern mechanical design methods;(2) ME324 "Precision Engineering", I redesigned the curriculum for and co-teach this course in conjunction with my advisor, Dave Beach, and (3) ME103D "Engineering Drawing and Design" which I co-teach with Craig Milroy. Prior to teaching and working towards my PhD, I was a teaching assistant in the Product Realization Lab while pursuing my masters in Mechanical Engineering - a formative experience which laid the foundation for the classes I teach now and the research I am interested in.

Education

  • PhD, Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University (expected graduation 2018)
  • M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 2012
  • B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 2010
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