DesignXSpring2010

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''Functionally diverse team members bring a unique set of cognitive skills to team interaction; it is less clear how these differences affect the exchange of critical mutually-required team information. This cognitive diversity in new product design (NPD) teams increases the likelihood that individual team members will perceive the team’s task differently, leading to “cognitive representational gaps” between teammates’ interpretations of both the task and potential solution. This research will test the hypothesis that cognitively diverse NPD teams develop representational gaps based on individual cognitive preferences between convergent and divergent information types and these cognitive preferences influence both task definition and solution. It will also test the hypothesis that this limiting behavior can be overcome by team leadership that bridges cognitive preferences, with a technique “pivot thinking.” Understanding how these general mechanisms work should deepen our understanding of information processing and conflict in diverse NPD teams. ''  
''Functionally diverse team members bring a unique set of cognitive skills to team interaction; it is less clear how these differences affect the exchange of critical mutually-required team information. This cognitive diversity in new product design (NPD) teams increases the likelihood that individual team members will perceive the team’s task differently, leading to “cognitive representational gaps” between teammates’ interpretations of both the task and potential solution. This research will test the hypothesis that cognitively diverse NPD teams develop representational gaps based on individual cognitive preferences between convergent and divergent information types and these cognitive preferences influence both task definition and solution. It will also test the hypothesis that this limiting behavior can be overcome by team leadership that bridges cognitive preferences, with a technique “pivot thinking.” Understanding how these general mechanisms work should deepen our understanding of information processing and conflict in diverse NPD teams. ''  
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''Download'' : [https://www.stanford.edu/group/designx_lab/cgi-bin/mainwiki/index.php/Image:Pivot_Thinking_Research_Overview.pdf Paper (PDF)&nbsp];: Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)  
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''Download'' : [https://www.stanford.edu/group/designx_lab/cgi-bin/mainwiki/index.php/Image:Pivot_Thinking_Research_Overview.pdf Paper (PDF)];: Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)  
''Facilitated by [mailto:karl@cdr.stanford.edu Karl Gumerlock]''  
''Facilitated by [mailto:karl@cdr.stanford.edu Karl Gumerlock]''  

Revision as of 07:42, 17 March 2010

Contents

31 March 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by David Sirkin


07 April 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Jonathan Edelman


14 April 2010 : Mark Schar : "Quals Presentation: Pivot Thinking"

Functionally diverse team members bring a unique set of cognitive skills to team interaction; it is less clear how these differences affect the exchange of critical mutually-required team information. This cognitive diversity in new product design (NPD) teams increases the likelihood that individual team members will perceive the team’s task differently, leading to “cognitive representational gaps” between teammates’ interpretations of both the task and potential solution. This research will test the hypothesis that cognitively diverse NPD teams develop representational gaps based on individual cognitive preferences between convergent and divergent information types and these cognitive preferences influence both task definition and solution. It will also test the hypothesis that this limiting behavior can be overcome by team leadership that bridges cognitive preferences, with a technique “pivot thinking.” Understanding how these general mechanisms work should deepen our understanding of information processing and conflict in diverse NPD teams.

Download : Paper (PDF);: Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Karl Gumerlock


21 April 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Neeraj Sonalkar


28 April 2010 : Greg Kress and Mark Schar : "Teamology"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Noah Kim


05 May 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Lauren Aquino Shluzas


12 May 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Micah Lande


19 May 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Rebecca Currano


26 May 2010 : (Open Slot) Presenter Name : "Presentation Title"

No abstract available for this talk.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Michael Helms


02 June 2010 : Forrest Glick : "Designing Presentations/Visualizing Information"

Forrest Glick is the Director of Educational Technology at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program.

Download : Paper (PDF) : Presentation (PPT/PDF) : Video (MP4)

Facilitated by Bettina Maisch

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