Calendar

Apr
20
Mon
2020
Mini-Grand Rounds - Colin Kahl, PhD @ Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds – Colin Kahl, PhD
Apr 20 @ 7:00 am – 7:30 am Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds - Colin Kahl, PhD @ Zoom

Mini-Grand Rounds: Aftershocks: The Coronavirus Pandemic and The New World Disorder

Colin H. Kahl
Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation
Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science
Co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation

7:00am – 7:30am, Zoom

The Stanford Radiology Mini-Grand Round live session events are by invitation only. Invites with link to Zoom video will be sent via email to Department faculty and staff only. Recordings will be made available to the public shortly after the event.

Apr
22
Wed
2020
Mini-Grand Rounds - Nicholas Bloom, PhD @ Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds – Nicholas Bloom, PhD
Apr 22 @ 7:00 am – 7:30 am Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds - Nicholas Bloom, PhD @ Zoom

Mini-Grand Rounds: The short-run challenges and long-run opportunities of working from home

Nicholas Bloom, PhD
Professor (by courtesy), Economics
Senior Fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

7:00am – 7:30am, Zoom

The Stanford Radiology Mini-Grand Round live session events are by invitation only. Invites with link to Zoom video will be sent via email to Department faculty and staff only. Recordings will be made available to the public shortly after the event.

SCIT Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
SCIT Quarterly Seminar
Apr 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
SCIT Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
“Tumor-Immune Interactions in TNBC Brain Metastases”
Maxine Umeh Garcia, PhD

ABSTRACT: It is estimated that metastasis is responsible for 90% of cancer deaths, with 1 in every 2 advanced staged triple-negative breast cancer patients developing brain metastases – surviving as little as 4.9 months after metastatic diagnosis. My project hypothesizes that the spatial architecture of the tumor microenvironment reflects distinct tumor-immune interactions that are driven by receptor-ligand pairing; and that these interactions not only impact tumor progression in the brain, but also prime the immune system (early on) to be tolerant of disseminated cancer cells permitting brain metastases. The main goal of my project is to build a model that recapitulates tumor-immune interactions in brain-metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, and use this model to identify novel druggable targets to improve survival outcomes in patients with devastating brain metastases.

“Classification of Malignant and Benign Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors With An Open Source Feature Selection Platform”
Michael Zhang, MD

ABSTRACT: Radiographic differentiation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from benign PNSTs is a diagnostic challenge. The former is associated with a five-year survival rate of 30-50%, and definitive management requires gross total surgical with wide negative margins in areas of sensitive neurologic function. This presentation describes a radiomics approach to pre-operatively identifying a diagnosis, thereby possibly avoiding surgical complexity and debilitating symptoms. Using an open-source, feature extraction platform and machine learning, we produce a radiographic signature for MPNSTs based on routine MRI.

IBIIS/AIMI Seminar - Tiwari @ ZOOM - See Description for Zoom link
IBIIS/AIMI Seminar – Tiwari
Apr 22 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm ZOOM - See Description for Zoom link
IBIIS/AIMI Seminar - Tiwari @ ZOOM - See Description for Zoom link

Radiomics and Radio-Genomics: Opportunities for Precision Medicine

Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/99904033216?pwd=U2tTdUp0YWtneTNUb1E4V2x0OTFMQT09 

Pallavi Tiwari, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Associate Member, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center
Director of Brain Image Computing Laboratory
School of Medicine | Case Western Reserve University


Abstract:
In this talk, Dr. Tiwari will focus on her lab’s recent efforts in developing radiomic (extracting computerized sub-visual features from radiologic imaging), radiogenomic (identifying radiologic features associated with molecular phenotypes), and radiopathomic (radiologic features associated with pathologic phenotypes) techniques to capture insights into the underlying tumor biology as observed on non-invasive routine imaging. She will focus on clinical applications of this work for predicting disease outcome, recurrence, progression and response to therapy specifically in the context of brain tumors. She will also discuss current efforts in developing new radiomic features for post-treatment evaluation and predicting response to chemo-radiation treatment. Dr. Tiwari will conclude with a discussion on her lab’s findings in AI + experts, in the context of a clinically challenging problem of post-treatment response assessment on routine MRI scans.

Apr
24
Fri
2020
Mini-Grand Rounds - Ann Leung, MD @ Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds – Ann Leung, MD
Apr 24 @ 7:00 am – 7:30 am Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds - Ann Leung, MD @ Zoom

Mini-Grand Rounds: Stanford University Medical Center and COVID-19: A Chest Radiologist’s Perspective

Ann Leung, MD
Associate Chair, Clinical Affairs
Professor, Radiology

7:00am – 7:30am, Zoom

The Stanford Radiology Mini-Grand Round live session events are by invitation only. Invites with link to Zoom video will be sent via email to Department faculty and staff only. Recordings will be made available to the public shortly after the event.

Apr
27
Mon
2020
Mini-Grand Rounds - David Larson, MD, MBA @ Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds – David Larson, MD, MBA
Apr 27 @ 7:00 am – 7:30 am Zoom
Mini-Grand Rounds - David Larson, MD, MBA @ Zoom

Mini-Grand Rounds: The Outlook for Radiology in the Next Phases of the Pandemic and Beyond

David Larson, MD, MBA
Vice Chair, Education and Clinical Operations
Associate Professor, Radiology

7:00am – 7:30am, Zoom

The Stanford Radiology Mini-Grand Round live session events are by invitation only. Invites with link to Zoom video will be sent via email to Department faculty and staff only. Recordings will be made available to the public shortly after the event.

May
7
Thu
2020
SMIS Quarterly Seminar
May 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Zoom:

Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) Program
Quarterly Seminar

Andrew Groll, PhD
Mentor: Craig Levin, PhD
“Initial Experimental Images from a CZT Preclinical PET System”

Brian Lee, PhD
Mentors: Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD; Craig Levin, PhD
“Precision Health Toilet for Cancer Screening”

 

Aug
4
Tue
2020
SMIS Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom:
SMIS Quarterly Seminar
Aug 4 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Zoom:
SMIS Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom:

Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) Program Quarterly Seminar

Zoom meeting: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/99117388314?pwd=R29OSjlTdUt0a3pLaG5Zc1BFNTJIUT09
Password: 922183

Guolan Lu, PhD
Mentor: Eben Rosenthal, MD; Garry Nolan, PhD
“Co-administered Antibody Improves the Penetration of Antibody-Dye Conjugates into Human Cancers: Implications for AntibodyDrug Conjugates”

Dianna Jeong, PhD
Mentors: Craig Levin, PhD; Shan Wang, PhD
“Novel Detection Approaches for Achieving Ultra-fast time resolution for PET”

 

Oct
21
Wed
2020
SCIT Quarterly Seminar @ See description for ZOOM link
SCIT Quarterly Seminar
Oct 21 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am See description for ZOOM link

ZOOM LINK HERE

“High Resolution Breast Diffusion Weighted Imaging”
Jessica McKay, PhD

ABSTRACT: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a quantitative MRI method that measures the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water molecules, which reflects cell density and serves as an indication of malignancy. Unfortunately, however, the clinical value of DWI is severely limited by the undesirable features in images that common clinical methods produce, including large geometric distortions, ghosting and chemical shift artifacts, and insufficient spatial resolution. Thus, in order to exploit information encoded in diffusion characteristics and fully assess the clinical value of ADC measurements, it is first imperative to achieve technical advancements of DWI.

In this talk, I will largely focus on the background of breast DWI, providing the clinical motivation for this work and explaining the current standard in breast DWI and alternatives proposed throughout the literature. I will also present my PhD dissertation work in which a novel strategy for high resolution breast DWI was developed. The purpose of this work is to improve DWI methods for breast imaging at 3 Tesla to robustly provide diffusion-weighted images and ADC maps with anatomical quality and resolution. This project has two major parts: Nyquist ghost correction and the use of simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) to achieve high resolution. Exploratory work was completed to characterize the Nyquist ghost in breast DWI, showing that, although the ghost is mostly linear, the three-line navigator is unreliable, especially in the presence of fat. A novel referenceless ghost correction, Ghost/Object minimization was developed that reduced the ghost in standard SE-EPI and advanced SMS. An advanced SMS method with axial reformatting (AR) is presented for high resolution breast DWI. In a reader study, AR-SMS was preferred by three breast radiologists compared to the standard SE-EPI and readout-segmented-EPI.


“Machine-learning Approach to Differentiation of Benign and Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors: A Multicenter Study”

Michael Zhang, MD

ABSTRACT: Clinicoradiologic differentiation between benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs) is a diagnostic challenge with important management implications. We sought to develop a radiomics classifier based on 900 features extracted from gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted MRI, using the Quantitative Imaging Feature Pipeline and the PyRadiomics package. Additional patient-specific clinical variables were recorded. A radiomic signature was derived from least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, followed by gradient boost machine learning. A training and test set were selected randomly in a 70:30 ratio. We further evaluated the performance of radiomics-based classifier models against human readers of varying medical-training backgrounds. Following image pre-processing, 95 malignant and 171 benign PNSTs were available. The final classifier included 21 features and achieved a sensitivity 0.676, specificity 0.882, and area under the curve (AUC) 0.845. Collectively, human readers achieved sensitivity 0.684, specificity 0.742, and AUC 0.704. We concluded that radiomics using routine gadolinium enhanced, T1-weighted MRI sequences and clinical features can aid in the evaluation of PNSTs, particularly by increasing specificity for diagnosing malignancy. Further improvement may be achieved with incorporation of additional imaging sequences.

Nov
18
Wed
2020
IBIIS & AIMI Seminar: Deep Tomographic Imaging @ Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/96731559276?pwd=WG5zcEFwSGlPcDRsOUFkVlRhcEs2Zz09
IBIIS & AIMI Seminar: Deep Tomographic Imaging
Nov 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/96731559276?pwd=WG5zcEFwSGlPcDRsOUFkVlRhcEs2Zz09

Ge Wang, PhD
Clark & Crossan Endowed Chair Professor
Director of the Biomedical Imaging Center
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Troy, New York

Abstract:
AI-based tomography is an important application and a new frontier of machine learning. AI, especially deep learning, has been widely used in computer vision and image analysis, which deal with existing images, improve them, and produce features. Since 2016, deep learning techniques are actively researched for tomography in the context of medicine. Tomographic reconstruction produces images of multi-dimensional structures from externally measured “encoded” data in the form of various transforms (integrals, harmonics, and so on). In this presentation, we provide a general background, highlight representative results, and discuss key issues that need to be addressed in this emerging field.

About:
AI-based X-ray Imaging System (AXIS) lab is led by Dr. Ge Wang, affiliated with the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies in the Biomedical Imaging Center. AXIS lab focuses on innovation and translation of x-ray computed tomography, optical molecular tomography, multi-scale and multi-modality imaging, and AI/machine learning for image reconstruction and analysis, and has been continuously well funded by federal agencies and leading companies. AXIS group collaborates with Stanford, Harvard, Cornell, MSK, UTSW, Yale, GE, Hologic, and others, to develop theories, methods, software, systems, applications, and workflows.