Calendar

Aug
23
Fri
2019
Canary CREST Program Ends: Ice Cream Social
Canary CREST Program Ends: Ice Cream Social
Aug 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Oct
23
Wed
2019
Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series - Michael Shen, Ph.D.
Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series – Michael Shen, Ph.D.
Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series - Michael Shen, Ph.D.

Cancer Early Detection Seminar

“Best Practices in Hip Imaging”

Michael Shen, PhD
Professor of Medicine, Genetics and Development, Urology and Systems Biology
Columbia University Medical Center

ABSTRACT
TBD

_____________________________________________
Hosted by
Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD<https://med.stanford.edu/profiles/sanjiv-gambhir>

Sponsored by
The Canary Center and the Stanford Cancer Institute
Stanford University

If you would like to be included on the email distribution list for weekly reminders, contact Ashley Williams (ashleylw.at.stanford.edu)

RSVP and more info at: https://www.onlineregistrationcenter.com/register/222/page1.asp?m=298&c=41

Jan
23
Thu
2020
Early Detection Seminar Series - Victoria Seewaldt, M.D. @ Beckman Center, Munzer Auditorium (B060)
Early Detection Seminar Series – Victoria Seewaldt, M.D.
Jan 23 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm Beckman Center, Munzer Auditorium (B060)
Early Detection Seminar Series - Victoria Seewaldt, M.D. @ Beckman Center, Munzer Auditorium (B060)

CEDSS: “Strategies to Identify Aggressive Breast Cancer Biology in Black and Latina Women”

Victoria Seewaldt, MD
Ruth Ziegler Professor and Chair, Department of Population Sciences
Associate Director for Population Sciences Research, Comprehensive Cancer Center
City of Hope

Beckman Center, Munzer Auditorium (B060)
11:00am – 12:00pm Seminar & Discussion
12:00pm – 12:15pm Reception & Light Refreshments
RSVP here: https://www.onlineregistrationcenter.com/VictoriaSeewaldt

ABSTRACT

Over 90% of breast cancer is cured; yet there remain highly aggressive breast cancers that develop rapidly and are extremely difficult to treat, much less prevent. Examples are triple-negative breast cancer in Black/African American women and luminal B breast cancers in Black/African Americans and Latinas. Breast cancers that rapidly develop between breast imaging are called “interval cancers”. Here we aim to investigate biologically aggressive precancerous breast lesions and their matched invasive breast cancers in women of diverse race and ethnicity. Our team has the unique ability to perform single cell in situ transcriptional profiling in combination with dynamic and spatial genomics/proteomics; this allows us to identify multi-dimensional spatial and temporal relationships that drive the transition from biologically aggressive pre-cancer to interval breast cancer.

 

ABOUT

Victoria Seewaldt, M.D., is an accomplished clinician and researcher who’s devoted to improving the lives of her patients and the community at large. She has led community outreach education efforts on cancer prevention through personal wellbeing and directed research aimed at finding biomarkers that can be used for early cancer detection, particularly triple-negative breast cancers that are especially resistant to treatment.

At City of Hope, Dr. Seewaldt will direct efforts to provide breast cancer education, free breast cancer screening and treatment, mentorship of young minority scholars, and a forum for community partnered trials. Clinically, Dr. Seewaldt aims to empower women at high breast cancer risk to be full partners in developing wellness strategies to promote personal health.

Dr. Seewaldt received her medical degree from the University of California, Davis, and completed her residency and clinical fellowship at the University of Washington in Seattle. She then pursued a medical oncology fellowship with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and then became an assistant professor at Ohio State University. Afterwards, she transferred to Duke University, where she held various clinical, academic and leadership roles in its School of Medicine and Comprehensive Cancer Center — most recently as a professor, co-leader of the breast and ovarian cancer program and head of the cancer breast prevention program — before joining City of Hope.

Jan
29
Wed
2020
SCIT Seminar: Muna Aryal Rizal, PhD and Eduardo Somoza, MD @ Glazer Learning Center (Lucas P083)
SCIT Seminar: Muna Aryal Rizal, PhD and Eduardo Somoza, MD
Jan 29 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am Glazer Learning Center (Lucas P083)
SCIT Seminar: Muna Aryal Rizal, PhD and Eduardo Somoza, MD @ Glazer Learning Center (Lucas P083)

Muna Aryal Rizal, PhD
Mentor: Jeremy Dahl, PhD and Raag Airan, MD, PhD

Noninvasive Focused Ultrasound Accelerates Glymphatic Transport to Bypass the Blood-Brain Barrier

ABSTRACT

Recent advancement in neuroscience revealed that the Central Nervous System (CNS) comprise glial-cell driven lymphatic system and coined the term called “Glymphatic pathway” by Neuroscientist, Maiden Nedergaard. Furthermore, it has been proven in rodent and non-human primate studies that the glymphatic exchange efficacy can decay in healthy aging, alzheimer’s disease models, traumatic brain injury, cerebral hemorrhage, and stroke. Studies in rodents have also shown that the glymphatic function can accelerate by doing easily-implemented, interventions like physical exercise, changes in body posture during sleep, intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and low dose alcohol (0.5 g/kg). Here, we proposed for the first time to accelerate the glymphatic function by manipulating the whole-brain ultrasonically using focused ultrasound, an emerging clinical technology that can noninvasively reach virtually throughout the brain. During this SCIT seminar, I will introduce the new ultrasonic approach to accelerates glymphatic transport and will share some preliminary findings.


Eduardo Somoza, MD
Mentor: Sandy Napel, PhD

Prediction of Clinical Outcomes in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) Utilizing Radiomic Features Derived from Pretreatment Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Scan

ABSTRACT

Diffuse Large B-Cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma, accounting for a third of cases worldwide. Despite advancements in treatment, the five-year percent survival for this patient population is around sixty percent. This indicates a clinical need for being able to predict outcomes before the initiation of standard treatment. The approach we will be employing to address this need is the creation of a prognostic model from pretreatment clinical data of DLBCL patients seen at Stanford University Medical Center. In particular, there will be a focus on the derivation of radiomic features from pretreatment positron emission tomography (PET) scans as this has not been thoroughly investigated in similar published research efforts. We will layout the framework for our approach, with an emphasis on the aspects of our design that will allow for the translation of our efforts to multiple clinical settings. More importantly, we will discuss the importance and challenges of assembling a quality clinical database for this type of research. Ultimately, we hope our efforts will lead to the development of a prognostic model that can be utilized to guide treatment in DLBCL patients with refractory disease and/or high risk of relapse after completion of standard treatment.

Mar
19
Thu
2020
CANCELLED - Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series - Azra Raza, M.D. @ CANCELLED
CANCELLED – Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series – Azra Raza, M.D.
Mar 19 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm CANCELLED
CANCELLED - Cancer Early Detection Seminar Series - Azra Raza, M.D. @ CANCELLED

Please note this seminar is now cancelled and will be rescheduled for a future date. Please contact Ashley Williams (ashleylw@stanford.edu) with any questions or concerns. Thank you for your understanding!

CEDSS: “The First Cell and the Human Cost of going after Cancer’s last”

Azra Raza, MD

Chan Soon-Shiong Professor of Medicine

Director, Myelodysplastic Syndrome Center

Columbia University Medical Center

Apr
22
Wed
2020
SCIT Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
SCIT Quarterly Seminar
Apr 22 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
SCIT Quarterly Seminar @ Zoom: https://stanford.zoom.us/j/98960758162?pwd=aHJJc3pDS3FONkZIc2FoZ0hqcXU1dz09
“Tumor-Immune Interactions in TNBC Brain Metastases”
Maxine Umeh Garcia, PhD

ABSTRACT: It is estimated that metastasis is responsible for 90% of cancer deaths, with 1 in every 2 advanced staged triple-negative breast cancer patients developing brain metastases – surviving as little as 4.9 months after metastatic diagnosis. My project hypothesizes that the spatial architecture of the tumor microenvironment reflects distinct tumor-immune interactions that are driven by receptor-ligand pairing; and that these interactions not only impact tumor progression in the brain, but also prime the immune system (early on) to be tolerant of disseminated cancer cells permitting brain metastases. The main goal of my project is to build a model that recapitulates tumor-immune interactions in brain-metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, and use this model to identify novel druggable targets to improve survival outcomes in patients with devastating brain metastases.

“Classification of Malignant and Benign Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors With An Open Source Feature Selection Platform”
Michael Zhang, MD

ABSTRACT: Radiographic differentiation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) from benign PNSTs is a diagnostic challenge. The former is associated with a five-year survival rate of 30-50%, and definitive management requires gross total surgical with wide negative margins in areas of sensitive neurologic function. This presentation describes a radiomics approach to pre-operatively identifying a diagnosis, thereby possibly avoiding surgical complexity and debilitating symptoms. Using an open-source, feature extraction platform and machine learning, we produce a radiographic signature for MPNSTs based on routine MRI.