Jelena Obradovic

Dr. Jelena Obradović, Project Director

Jelena is an associate professor at Stanford University in the Developmental and Psychological Sciences program at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Jelena received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota, under the supervision of Dr. Ann Masten. She was a Killam Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of British Columbia, working with Dr. Tom Boyce at the Human Early Learning Partnership. She was a junior fellow in the Canadian Institute for Advanced Researchís Experience-based Brain and Biological Development Program. She is currently a William T. Grant Foundation Scholar and is a recipient of the Society for Research in Child Development Early Career Research Contribution Award. Together with her collaborators, Jelena studies processes that contribute to resilience in diverse groups of children, including immigrant youth, inner-city children from high-risk, low-income backgrounds, and children living in rural Pakistan.

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POST-DOCTORAL SCHOLARS

Michael Sulik

Michael Sulik

Michael is a postdoctoral scholar in the Stanford Graduate School of Education. He received his Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Arizona State University in 2013, under the supervision of Dr. Nancy Eisenberg. Prior to joining the SPARK lab, Michael was an assistant research scientist in the Institute of Human Development and Social Change at New York University, where he worked with Dr. Clancy Blair on the Family Life Project, a prospective longitudinal study of child development in non-urban contexts. Michael's research interests focus on the development of self-regulation and psychopathology in early and middle childhood.


GRADUATE STUDENTS

Sarah Bardack

Sarah Bardack

Sarah is a doctoral student in Developmental and Psychological Sciences at Stanford University and a recipient of the IES fellowship training grant. She holds a B.A in French and Comparative Literature from New York University and an M.P.P. from the Georgetown Public Policy Institute, where she wrote a masterís thesis examining the determinants of family participation in early childhood development programs in India. Prior to coming to Stanford, Sarah worked for four years as a research associate in the Education, Human Development and Workforce Division at American Institutes for Research. Her research interests include classroom-based interventions, social and emotional development, executive functioning and resilience in at-risk children.

Jenna Finch

Jenna Finch

Jenna is a doctoral student in Developmental and Psychological Sciences at the Stanford Graduate School of Education and is a recipient of the Stanford Graduate Fellowship. She holds a B.A. in Psychology and Mathematics from Georgetown University, where she completed an honorís thesis examining the impacts of child care quality on childrenís regulatory skills. Her research interests include early childhood education and social policy, executive functions, early achievement gaps, and how positive adult-child relationships can promote resilience in disadvantaged youth. Jennaís dissertation will focus on how childrenís experiences during the summer months explain changes in achievement gaps between low- and high-income children from spring to fall.


GRADUATE STUDENT AFFILIATES

Elisa Garcia

Elisa Garcia

Elisa is a doctoral student in the Developmental and Psychological Sciences program at the Stanford Graduate School of Education. Before coming to Stanford, Elisa worked at the Institute for Womenís Policy Research and the American Institutes for Research, non-profit organizations in Washington, D.C. There, she worked on research projects that assessed the economic impact of the early care and education sector, and evaluated the effects of a literacy professional development program for low-income, urban elementary schools. Elisaís current research interests center on early childhood education and the language and social-emotional development of low-income children and dual language learners. Elisa received her B.A. in psychology and Spanish language and literature from Kenyon College in 2008.


ALUMNI GRADUATE STUDENTS


SPARK UNDERGRADUATES & ALUMNI