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A Study of Japanese Clause Linkage cover

A Study of Japanese Clause Linkage

The Connective TE in Japanese

Yoko Hasegawa

Employing a hybrid theoretical framework of Role and Reference Grammar and Construction Grammar, this volume investigates the syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic properties of the diverse families of Japanese constructions in which the verbal suffix TE (approximately English 'and') is a linking device. The TE suffix is the most frequent and versatile connective in Japanese, able to link all three types of verbal constituents. Because the semantic relations obtainable between the conjuncts are heterogeneous, the prevailing view is that TE-linkage is a mere syntactic device with no semantic content; and the interpreter must infer intended semantic relations based on extralinguistic knowledge. However, closer examination reveals clear correlations between its syntax and semantics that have been obscured in previous studies which did not investigate TE-constructions as pairings of form and meaning. Detailed analysis of TE-linkage is of special significance to linguistic theory because it inevitably involves the search for an adequate descriptive framework for representing connectives.

Yoko Hasegawa, Assistant Professor of Japanese Linguistics in the Department of East Asian Languages at the University of California, Berkeley, received her Ph.D. in Linguistics from UC Berkeley in 1992. She has taught at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and currently teaches Japanese Linguistics at both undergraduate and graduate levels and coordinates the UC Berkeley Japanese Language Program.

Contents

  • Preface
  • Notes on Transcriptions
  • 1 Introduction
    • 1 Objectives and Outline
    • 2 Morphosyntactic Characteristics TE-Linkage
      • 2.1 Verbal Suffix TE
      • 2.2 Conventional Categorization of TE-Constructions
      • 2.3 Coordination-Subordination
        • 2.3.1 Definitions
        • 2.3.2 Problems
        • 2.3.3 Coordination-Subordination-Continuum
        • 2.3.4 Seven Parameters
        • 2.3.5 Coordination-Subordination-Cosubordination
    • 3 Meaning of Connectives
      • 3.1 Independent and Dependent Semantic Aspects
      • 3.2 Implicature
      • 3.3 Constraints on TE-Linkage
        • 3.3.1 TEMPORAL SEQUENCE Relation and TE-Linkage
        • 3.3.2 ADDITIVE Relation and TE-Linkage
        • 3.3.3 CAUSE Relation and TE-Linkage
      • 3.4 Imai and Suto's Experiment
    • 4 Decoding and Encoding Idioms
    • 5 Grammatical Constructions
    • 6 Summary

  • 2 Basic Concepts in Role and Reference Grammar of Japanese
    • 1 The Layered Structure of the Clause
    • 2 Focus Structures
    • 3 Operators
    • 4 Juncture and Nexus
    • 5 Linkage Types
      • 5.1 Clausal Subordination
      • 5.2 Clausal Coordination
      • 5.3 Clausal Cosubordination
      • 5.4 Core Subodination
      • 5.5 Core Coordination
      • 5.6 Core Cosubordination
      • 5.7 Nuclear Juncture
    • 6 Lexical Representation of Verbals
      • 6.1 Vendler-Dowty Verb Classes
      • 6.2 Thematic Relations
      • 6.3 Macroroles
      • 6.4 The Actor-Undergoer Hierarchy

  • 3 TE-Linkage with Nuclear Juncture: Part I
    • 1 Nuclear vs. Core/Clausal Juncture
      • 1.1 Diagnostic Tests
      • 1.2 Propositionality
    • 2 TE SIMAW-Construction
      • 2.1 Nuclear Subordination
      • 2.2 Makiuchi's Analysis
      • 2.3 Nuclear-Layer Modification: Operator Construction
      • 2.4 Contextual Effects
      • 2.5 Modality of Regret/Surprise
      • 2.6 Obligatory Modality Interpretation
        • 2.6.1 Punctual Achievements
        • 2.6.2 Statives
      • 2.7 Obligatory Absence of Modality Interpretation
      • 2.8 Interpretation and Accomplishments
      • 2.9 TE-Predicates Which Permit [±Perfective]
      • 2.10 How Many TE SIMAW-Constructions?
    • 3 TE AR-Constructions
      • 3.1 Verbs of Existence
      • 3.2 Valence-Maintaining vs. Valence-Changing Construction
      • 3.3 Nuclear Subordination vs. Nuclear Coordination
      • 3.4 Argument Selections in Nuclear Condition: Macroroles
      • 3.5 Perfect vs. Resultatives
      • 3.6 Monovalent-Nonlocational vs. Bivalent-Locational Resultative
      • 3.7 Assertion vs. Implication of the Past Event
    • 4 Summary

  • 4 TE-Linkage with Nuclear Juncture: Part II
    • 1 Prototype Semantics
    • 2 The Verbs K- and IK-
      • 2.1 Concepts Involved in K- and IK-
      • 2.2 Canonical Usages in K- and IK-
      • 2.3 Metaphorical Extensions of K- and IK-
      • 2.4 Interpretation of Tense Markers
    • 3 Aktionsart of TE-Predicates
    • 4 Deictic THERE-Constructions
    • 5 General Remarks on TE- Constructions
    • 6 Physical-Space TE K-/IK-Constructions
      • 6.1 Prototype: Physical-Motion TE-Constructions
      • 6.2 Point-of-View TE-Constructions
        • 6.2.1 Subtype: Moving-Scenery TE-Construction
      • 6.3 Transfer TE-Construction
        • 6.3.1 Subject-Centered TE-Predicates
      • 6.4 Summary of Physical-Space TE-Constructions
    • 7 Cognitive TE-Constructions
    • 8 Moving-World TE-Constructions
    • 9 Moving-TIme TE-Construction
    • 10 Syntax of the TE K-/IK-Constructions
      • 10.1 Nuclear Subordination
      • 10.2 Nuclea Coordination
    • 11 Summary

  • 5 TE-Linkcage with Core Juncture
    • 1 Core Subordination
    • 2 Non-Embedded NexusTypes
    • 3 Semantic Relations in Non-Embedded Core Juncture
      • 3.1 Core Coordination
      • 3.2 Core Cosubordination
    • 4 Summary

  • 6 TE-Linkage with Clausal Juncture
    • 1 Clausal vs. Core Juncture with Non-Embedded
    • 2 Nexus Types
    • 3 CAUSE Relation
      • 3.1 TEMPORAL SEQUENCE
      • 3.2 Causation
      • 3.3 Causes and Reasons
    • 4 Inferred Intention
    • 5 Kuno's Controllability Constraint
    • 6 Abductive Interpretation of Reality and CONTRASTIVE Relation
      • 6.1 Abductive Reasoning
      • 6.2 CONTRASTIVE Relation
    • 7 SETTING and the Adclausal Nature of the First Conjunct
      • 7.1 Topic-Worthiness
      • 7.2 SETTING Relation
    • 8 Summary

  • 7 Concluding Remarks
    • 1 Nuclear Juncture
    • 2 Core Juncture
    • 3 Clausal Juncture
    • 4 TE-Linkage Interpreation Principle

  • References
  • Index

4/1/1996

ISBN (Paperback): 1575860260 (9781575860268)
ISBN (Cloth): 1575860279 (9781575860275)
Subject: Linguistics; Japanese Language--Connectives

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