CURRICULUM VITAE

Michael Vincent Wilcox
33 Peter Coutts Circle
Stanford, CA 94305
mwilcox@stanford.edu
650-576-5663

 

Employment

Associate Professor (Teaching), Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, (2012-present)

Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, (2001-2012)

Resident Fellow, Murray House, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, (2003-2013)

Education

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, MA
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Ph.D. ANTHROPOLOGY, June 2001
Thesis Title:  The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680: A   Contextual   Study of Ethnicity, Conflict and Indigenous Resistance in Colonial New Mexico

HARVARD UNIVERSITY, Cambridge, MA
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
MASTER OF ARTS, ANTHROPOLOGY, June 1995
High Pass awarded upon General Examination

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Santa Barbara
BACHELOR OF ARTS, ANTHROPOLOGY, Magna Cum Laude, 1993
Departmental Distinction in Major
Dean’s Award: Certificate of Academic Excellence
Advanced College Honors Curriculum  

National Professional Positions Held

Founding Member Harvard University Native Program Leadership Circle, (March 2016 – Present)

American Antiquity Editorial Board Member, (2015 – Present)

Co-Founder and Chair: Bay Area Cultural Landscapes Research Group, (2014 – Present)

Founder: Coalition of Indigenous Archaeologists, (2008 – Present)

Series Editor: Archaeology of Colonialism in North America: University of Arizona Press, (2009 – Present)

Chair: Society for American Archaeology, Indigenous Persons Interest Group, Chair, (2006 – 2010)

Amerind Foundation, Board Committee Member, (2005 – 2008)

Chair: Society for American Archaeology, Committee on Native American Relations, (2005 – 2006)

Ford Fellow: National Science Foundation, (2005 – 2006)

Journal of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Reviewer, (2014 – Present)

American Historical Review Reviewer, (2009 – Present)

American Anthropologist Reviewer, (2008 – Present)

University of Arizona Press Reviewer, (2005 – Present)

Journal of Social Archaeology Reviewer, (2004 – Present)

Awards and Grants

Mid-Peninsula Regional Open Space District Archaeological and Historical Research Grant, (2013 – Present)

Stanford University Award, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity Award for Outstanding Mentorship 2010

Pueblo of Jemez, Indigenous Archaeology Field Project, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (VPUE), Research Grant, Stanford University (2006-2012)

Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (VPUE), Research Grant, Stanford University Archaeological Field School at Abó, New Mexico (2003-04, 2004-05)  

National Academies of Science, Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of California at Berkeley, 2004-05

Anne Medicine Mentorship Award Stanford University 2004

Outstanding Mentor for Native American Student Award 2006-2016, Stanford University

Outstanding Mentor for Native American Student Award 2002, Stanford University

Mellon Foundation Dissertation Completion Award 1999-2000

Harvard Native American Program Doctoral Research Fellowship 2000-2001

Harvard University, Graduate School Prize Fellowship Admissions Award 1993-1999

Harvard University Certificate of Distinction in Teaching 1996, 1997, 1998

Mellon Foundation Dissertation Fieldwork Award 1996-1999

Derek Bok Center Graduate Writing Fellows Program 1997, Harvard University

William Jones 1900 Fund for Native American Students at Harvard 1993-1999

Recent Research

My most current research applies the basic tenets of Indigenous Archaeology to the colonial history of California, specifically in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a variety of reasons some institutional, some methodological and some theoretical, the early colonial history of California has emphasized the missions as the center of scholarship, intellectual debate, fieldwork and historically speaking, supported a pervasive mythology of extinction for many California Indians. Using previously untranslated documents (currently over 600) from the Pueblo of San Jose California (among other databases), archaeological data from two and a half years of survey and excavation in the Santa Cruz Mountains, this recent scholarship details a reversal of the traditional narrative of California Indians- particularly in the Bay Area. Historical documents extending from the late eighteenth and mid-nineteenth century expose a series of rebellions within the missions in which Native peoples used the foothills of the San Francisco Bay Area as a place of escape, refuge and eventually, employment. There are also several references to Native Peoples who never entered the missions. The scale and the length of time of this activity and movement has been poorly documented. I am hopeful that this research will help local tribes in their efforts to achieve public and possibly Federal recognition.

Unfortunately for archaeologists, most of this “hinterlands” landscape had been privately held and unavailable for study. Over the past 30 years, the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District has purchased much of this land (60,000 acres extending 70 miles). Recognizing the scale of this research, in 2013, I founded the Bay Area Cultural Landscape Research Group. Working in partnership with local tribes, the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, California State Park Archaeologists as well as scholars from UC Berkeley, UC Santa Cruz, San Jose State, Santa Clara University and local community colleges, an integrated working group has been created that studies this period with a new sense of collaboration, giving rise to a new set of questions. This research project will serve as the basis for a monograph as well as several journal articles. This is an extension to my previous research areas that include the following research interests:

Research Interests

Indigenous archaeology, colonization and violence, ethnohistory of Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest, The Pueblo Revolt of 1680, archaeological approaches to ethnicity, ancient DNA and identity, the construction of race in America (blood quantum), contact period and colonial archaeologies, Hawaiian archaeology, Indigenous subsistence technologies; San Francisco Bay Area Native American historical archaeology, Chaco Canyon, political and historical relationships between Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, anthropologists and archaeologists, ethnic identity and conflict, colonization of Hawaii, Hawaiian systems of indigenous resource management.

Publications

Monographs and Books

(In Prep) Claiming Home, Reclaiming History: Rebellion, Mobility and the Narratives of Invisibility Among California’s Bay Area Natives. (Monograph- press to be determined).

2015 Rethinking Colonial Pasts Through Archaeology, co-edited with Rodney Harrison and Neal Ferris. Oxford University Press. Oxford, United Kingdom.

2009 The Pueblo Revolt and the Mythology of Conquest: An Indigenous Archaeology of Contact. University of California Press. Berkeley, California.

Articles

(In Prep) Reversing the Terminal Narrative: Rethinking Conquest from The Pueblo Revolt to the Indigenous Rebellions of California. (American Antiquity).

(In Prep) When is a conquest? Rethinking the Early Colonial and Indigenous History of the San Francisco Bay Area: Documentary and Archaeological Evidence From The Hinterlands (Journal of Field Archaeology).

(In Press) “Questioning Conquest in The Pueblo World.” In Contesting the Borderlands. Edited by Deborah and Jon Lawrence. University of Oklahoma Press.

2015 Indigenous Archaeology and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680: Social Mobility and Boundary Maintenance in Colonial Contexts. In From The Margins: The Archaeology of the Colonized. Edited by Rodney Harrison, Neal Ferris and Michael Wilcox. Oxford University Press.

2014 Book Review: Pueblo Indians and Spanish Colonial Authority in Eighteenth-Century New Mexico. Tracy L. Brown. American Historical Review, Oxford Journals. Volume 119, Issue 5: 1685-1687.

2012 Colonizing The Genome: DNA and The New Raciology In American Archaeology. Scientific Discourses and Cultural Difference. Edited by Gesa Mackenthun. Waxmann Verlag, Berlin.

2010    Saving Indigenous Peoples from Ourselves: Separate but Equal Archaeology is not Scientific Archaeology. American Antiquity, Volume 75, Number 2, 221-228.

2010    Marketing Conquest and the Vanishing Indian: An Indigenous Response to Jared Diamond’s Guns, Germs and Steel and Collapse. Journal of Social Archaeology. Volume 10, Number 1, 93-117.

2009    Marketing Conquest and the Vanishing Indian: An Indigenous Response to Jared Diamond’s Guns Germs and Steel and Collapse. In Questioning Collapse. Edited by Norm Yoffee and Patricia McAnany. Cambridge University Press. 113-142.

2009    NAGPRA and Indigenous Peoples: The Social Context and Controversies, and the Transformation of American Archaeology. In Voices in American Archaeology: Society for American Archaeology 75th Anniversary Special Volume. Society for American Archaeology Press. 178-192.

2005    Schizophrenia on the Frontier. In Native American Voices on Identity, Art, & Culture: Objects of Everlasting Esteem. Edited by Lucy Fowler Williams, William Wierzbowski, & Robert W. Preucel. University of Pennsylvania Press. 95-96.

2002    Social Memory and the Pueblo Revolt: A Postcolonial Perspective. In Archaeologies of the Pueblo Revolt: Identity, Meaning, and Renewal in the Pueblo World. Edited by Robert W. Preucel. University of New Mexico Press. 167-180.

2001    ‘Now the God of the Spaniards is Dead’: Ethnogenesis and Community Formation in the Aftermath of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. Robert W. Preucel, Loa Traxler and Michael Wilcox co-authors. Traditions, Transitions and Technologies. Proceedings of the 2000 Southwest Symposium. 71-93.

2000    Dialogue or Diatribe? Indians and Archaeologists in the Post-NAGPRA Era. In Spirit Wars: Native North American Religions in the Age of Nation Building. Edited by Ronald Niezen. University of California Press. 190-193.

Conference Papers

2016 “Native Americans, Anthropologists, and Filmmakers” Invited Speaker. Wittenberg University Colloquium. Springfield, Ohio.

2015 “Cubism, History and Narrative in Archaeology: Shifting Borders and Disciplinary Boundaries from New Mexico to California.” Invited Speaker, Frixell Award Presented to David Hurst Thomas. Society For American Archaeology Annual Meeting, San Francisco California.

2014 “Franciscan Florida In a Pan-Borderlands Perspective: Adaptation, Negotiation and Resistance Language and Rebellion” Invited Speaker. Flagler Conference on Colonial History. Saint Augustine, Florida.

2014 “Collaboration 101: Practical Tips and Cautionary Tales In Community Based Archaeology” Discussant. Society For American Archaeology Annual Meeting. Austin Texas.

2014 “The Consequences of Social Violence in the Pueblo World.” Invited Speaker, Society for Anthropological Sciences Annual Meeting, Albuquerque New Mexico.

2013 “Indigenous Archaeology: A view of Indigenous Histories from The Pueblo World to Hawaii.” Keynote Speaker, Society for Hawaiian Archaeology, Kona Hawaii.

2013 “Origins, Influences and the Future: Indigenous Archaeology and the Narratives of History”. Keynote Speaker Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting, Honolulu Hawaii.

2012 “North American Indigenous Borderlands History: A View From the Pueblo World” Invited Speaker, Native American and Indigenous Studies Conference, Mohegan Sun Connecticut.

2011   “Reversing the Terminal Narrative: Native American Histories and Indigenous Archaeology.” Invited Speaker, Plenary Session. Society for Historical Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2011    “The Archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt of 1680: Social Mobility and Boundary Maintenance on a Fragile Frontier.” Society for Historical Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2010    “The Life of the Project: Negotiating the Practical Ethics of Collaborative Research.” Chair, Forum Discussion. Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2009    “Culturally Unidentifiable Human Remains Policy: What is at Stake for Archaeologists and Native Peoples?” Chair, Forum (Sponsored by the Indigenous Populations Interest Group) Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2008    “Terminal Narratives and the Pueblo Revolt of 1680.” In Exploring Native American Concepts of Historical Archaeology. Discussant. Society for Historical Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2008    “Collaboration, Terminal Narratives and Continuity in the Pueblo World.” In Something For Everyone: Approaches to Collaboration With Native American And First Nations Communities. Plenary Session Speaker (sponsored by the SAA Committee on Native American Relations) Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2007    “Colonizing The Genome: DNA And The New Raciology In American       Archaeology.” Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting.

2006    “Colonization as Accident: Archaeology and the Creation of the ‘Invisible Indian.’” Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting.

2005    “Indigenous Archaeology, Postcolonial Studies and the Borderlands: A View From the American Southwest.” Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2005    “Archaeological Narratives and the ‘Invisible Indians’ Who Passed NAGPRA.” Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology annual Meeting.

2004    “Statement as Chair of the Committee for Indigenous Relations regarding the Kennewick Man Decision.” Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology annual Meeting.

2004    “Integrating Native American Perspectives: Working With Educational, Professional and Cultural Barriers to Multivocality.” Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

2004    “Culture Contact: The View from the American Southwest in a Post-NAGPRA Age.” Paper presented at the Culture Contact Conference (Co-Chair), Stanford University.

2003    “Kennewick Man and the Reaction: Abandoning the Spirit of NAGPRA.” Paper presented at the World Archaeological Congress, Washington D.C.

2003    “Politicizing Archaeology to make the point that Archaeology is Not Political: the Kennewick Debacle in the Press.” Paper presented at the World Archaeological Conference, Washington D.C.

2002    “Scratching the Surface: Implications of Indigenous Archaeology.” (Symposium Organizer and Chair). Sponsored by SAA Committee on Native American Relations Denver, Colorado.

1999    “Communities of Resistance: Ethnicity and The Pueblo Revolt of 1680.” Paper presented at a Special Session on the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting.

Media

Science, Grave Disputes
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6001/166.1.full

Science, Walking in Two Worlds
http://www.sciencemag.org/content/330/6001/168.full

NPR Interview, Our Times with Craig Barnes, Broadcast on KSFR Santa Fe
http://www.craig-barnes.com/radio/
http://www.craig-barnes.com/media/wilcox.mp3

Santa Fe New Mexican, New book explores Spanish conquest brutality
http://www.santafenewmexican.com/LocalNews/New-book-explores-Spanish-conquest-brutality

Albuquerque Journal, Conflict of the Conquest Continues to this Day http://www.abqjournal.com/north/28224017north03-28-10.htm

UC Press Blog, Indigenous Archaeology and the Pueblo Revolt
http://www.ucpress.edu/blog/5000/indigenous-archaeology-and-the-pueblo-revolt/

Fieldwork

Muwekma Ohlone Historic Research Project, 2012-Present

Principal Investigator: Preserving Cultural Heritage and Agricultural Technology in Ancient Hawaii: An Archaeological and Ethnobotanical Survey of the Breadfruit Economy, 2011-2013

Director, Stanford University Jemez Pueblo/Navajo Nation Archaeological Project 2005-2011

Principal Investigator, Abó Archaeological Research Project 2003-2004

Director, Salinas Pueblo at Abó Archaeological Field School, 2004

Cochiti Research Project: Project Assistant, 1996-1998.

Cultural Resource Management Youth Program Coordinator, Gila River Indian Community, Sacaton Arizona, summer 1995.

Additional Experience

Stanford University Repatriation Committee Chair, 2007-2013

Native American Program at Harvard: Faculty Advisory Board Member,

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 1996-2000

Peabody Museum Repatriation Committee: Native American Representative 1996-2000.

Graduate Student Representative to Anthropology Department Faculty, Harvard University, 1994-95.

Summer Youth Program Organizer, Department of Cultural Resource Management, Gila River Indian Community: Sacaton, Arizona, 1994

Summer Youth Internship Program: Pueblo of Cochiti, New Mexico, summer 1996-2000