Course Description

An introduction to the concepts and applications in computer vision. Topics include: cameras and projection models, low-level image processing methods such as filtering and edge detection; mid-level vision topics such as segmentation and clustering; shape reconstruction from stereo, as well as high-level vision tasks such as object recognition, scene recognition, face detection and human motion categorization. Prerequisites: linear algebra, basic probability and statistics..

Class Time and Location

Spring quarter (April - June, 2017).
Lecture: Monday, Wednesday 3:00pm-4:20pm
Skilling Auditorium (map)
Section: Friday 3:30pm-~4:20pm Gates B01

Office Hours

Kenji: Mon 4:30-6:30pm, Gates 200
JunYoung: Tue 9:00am-11:00am, Gates 200
Boris: Tue 1:30pm-3:30pm, Gates 200
Helen: Wed 12:30pm-2:30pm, Gates 259
Trevor: Wed 4:30pm-6:30pm, Gates 200
Jingwei: Thu 2:00pm-4:00pm, Gates 200
Amir: Fri 10:00am-12:00pm, Gates 259
Silvio: Fri 1:00pm-2:00pm, Gates 154

Grading Policy

See the Grading Page for more details on grading.

Course Discussions

Stanford students: Piazza

Assignment Details

See the Assignment Page for more details on how to hand in your assignments.

Course Project Details

See the Project Page for more details on the course project.

Prerequisites

FAQ

Can I take this course on credit/no credit basis?
Yes. Credit will be given to those who would have otherwise earned a C- or above.
Can I audit or sit in?
In general we are very open to sitting-in guests if you are a member of the Stanford community (registered student, staff, and/or faculty). Out of courtesy, we would appreciate that you first email us or talk to the instructor after the first class you attend. If the class is too full and we're running out of space, we would ask that you please allow registered students to attend.
Is there a textbook for this course?
This year we are trying to make our own self-contained course notes. However, we do recommend some some textbooks for this course, and they usually can be found at Stanford Libraries. The recommended textbooks are
  • D. A. Forsyth and J. Ponce. Computer Vision: A Modern Approach (2nd Edition). Prentice Hall, 2011. link
  • R. Hartley and A. Zisserman. Multiple View Geometry in Computer Vision. Cambridge University Press, 2003. link
Can I work in groups for the Final Project?
Yes, in groups of up to three people.
I have a question about the class. What is the best way to reach the course staff?
Stanford students please use an internal class forum on Piazza so that other students may benefit from your questions and our answers. If you have a personal matter, email us at the class mailing list cs231a-spr1617-staff@lists.stanford.edu.
Can I combine the Final Project with another course?
Yes, you may. There are a couple of courses concurrently offered with CS231A that are natural choices, such as CS231N (Convolutional Neural Networks, by Prof. Fei-Fei Li). Speak to the instructors if you want to combine your final project with another course.