Bonnie Krejci
Graduating Students 2016

Mentor TA

This is my second year as the Mentor TA for the Linguistics Department. I serve as a liason between teaching assistants, faculty, and the Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning. I support TAs by finding workshops, courses, and events across the university so that they can develop their teaching skills.

This Fall, I am co-instructing the TA Training Workshop with Beth Levin. New TAs will learn strategies for leading productive discussion sections, incorporating activities into their sections, and providing student feedback. In order to gain experience with course design, TAs will also develop a syllabus and course materials for a course that they want to teach.

Food Talks

In Spring of 2016, I was a Teaching Fellow for Food Talks, a course at the intersection of language, food, and culture. As part of the Thinking Matters program for freshmen, the course served as an introduction to liberal education, with a focus on developing critical thinking skills in writing and discussion.

I led my students into explorations of language and thought, linguistic metaphor, the relationship between food, gender, and social class, and the history of global food migrations. My students completed the quarter by designing and carrying out original research projects, each one offering insight into how we talk, how we eat, and how we live.

Field Methods Workshop

In Spring of 2015, Kate Lindsey and I co-taught a ten-week interactive field methods workshop. We met with our ten students once a week for 90 minutes, including 30 minutes of planning and a 60 minute elicitation with a native Czech speaker. The workshop focused on software, tools, and methods for gathering novel linguistic data, analyzing and organizing the data, producing linguistic and theoretical descriptions of the language, and compiling a dictionary. The workshop provided hands-on experience with language description and documentation, and benefited not only prospective field workers, but also students of linguistics interested in working with primary data other than their own native speaker intuitions.

You can find the syllabus here.

Voices of California TA

During 2014-2015, I served as the Voices of California TA for the Linguistics Department. The Voices of California Project is a department-wide collaboration aimed at documenting the speech and stories of communities of English speakers in California, particularly as-yet-unrepresented speakers in rural, inland areas of the state. We conduct audio-recorded informal interviews with native Californians, transcribe the speech, time-align the text transcript to the audio, and use the annotated data in our sociolinguistic research. I trained and managed undergraduate transcribers and aligners, maintained and organized the existing corpus, prepared data sets for researchers, and made sure researchers were up-to-date with their CITI training. I have conducted interviews at two of our field sites, and I helped plan a week-long retreat where we analyzed the newest data.

Teaching Assistantships

My favorite part of of teaching is encouraging my students to re-examine their assumptions about the nature of language and how one goes about studying it. I especially like teaching writing intensive courses where students learn how to construct a linguistic argument; it is so satisfying to watch their writing go from zero to syntactician over the course of the ten weeks.

In 2017, I was awarded the Centennial Teaching Assistant Award from Stanford for service and dedication to teaching.

  1. The Syntax of English, with Prof. Vera Gribanova. Stanford University, Spring 2017. (Section leader.)
  2. Introduction to Linguistics, with Prof. Asya Pereltsvaig. Stanford University, Spring 2015. (Section leader.)
  3. Crosslinguistic Syntax, with Prof. Vera Gribanova. Stanford University, Spring 2014. (Section leader.)
  4. Introduction to Cognitive Science, with Prof. Colin Bannard. University of Texas, Spring 2012.
  5. Introduction to the Study of Language, with Prof. Anthony Woodbury. University of Texas, Fall 2011.
  6. Language and Thought, with Prof. Patience Epps. University of Texas, Spring 2011.
  7. Doing Ethnography, with Prof. Tina Harris. Texas Tech University, Spring 2010.

Guest lectures

  1. First Conjunct Agreement in Russian, in Foundations of Syntactic Theory I, with Prof. Vera Gribanova. Stanford University, Fall 2016.
  2. Research in Syntax, in Introduction to Research for Undergraduates with Instructor Lelia Glass. Stanford University, Fall 2015.
  3. Lexical Semantics, in Introduction to Linguistics with Prof. Asya Pereltsvaig. Stanford University, Spring 2015.
  4. Weather Predicates Crosslinguistically, in Lexical Semantics with Prof. Beth Levin. Stanford University, Fall 2014.
  5. A Case Study of Hindi, an Indo-Aryan Language, in Languages of the World with Prof. Asya Pereltsvaig. Stanford University, Winter 2014.
  6. Lexical Semantics, in Introduction to the Study of Language with Prof. Anthony Woodbury. University of Texas, Fall 2011.
  7. The Encyclopedic View of Word Meaning, in Language and Thought with Prof. Patience Epps. University of Texas, Spring 2011.
  8. Native Anthropology, in Doing Ethnography with Prof. Tina Harris. Texas Tech University, Spring 2010.

Splash!

Splash! is a program that brings high school and middle school students to Stanford's campus for a two-day learning extravaganza. I've taught three classes so far, and found it to be a great opportunity to introduce younger students to the study of language.

Course descriptions can be found here.

  1. Linguistic Taboo, Spring 2015.
  2. Language Myths, Language Truths, co-taught with Kate Lindsey, Fall 2014.
  3. Language Around the World: Introduction to Linguistic Typology, Spring 2014.