Pritchard Lab Data



We are committed to public data release. Please let us know if there is anything you can't find.

  • eQTL Web Site. This website includes data from our projects on QTL mapping in human lymphoblastoid cells using RNA-seq, DNase-seq and other techniques [Pickrell et al 2010], as well as a browser summarizing results from a collection of published eQTL studies. It also includes some scripts for RNA-seq analysis.

  • SDS is an approach for studying very recent changes in allele frequencies within a population, using whole genome sequence data. Applied to data from the UK10K Project (3000 individuals) we estimate that SDS reflects frequency changes during the past 2,000 years. Large changes in frequencies imply adaptive events. The software was developed by Yair Field, and the paper was jointly written by Yair, Evan Boyle, and Natalie Telis. [software] [preprint] [SDS values in UK10K]

  • Duplicate gene data. Summary data from the paper by Lan and Pritchard (2016) on the evolution of expression in duplicate genes are available here: [data].

  • Centipede Web Site. CENTIPEDE is a method developed by Roger Pique-Regi and Jacob Degner that uses PWM information plus experimental data such as DNase1, histone marks or FAIRE to infer transcription factor binding sites with high specificity.

  • Haplotter Web Site. A web-browser for checking for signals of selection in the human genome based on the Phase II HapMap data. See Voight et al (2006) PLoS Biology. A map of recent positive selection in the human genome. [PDF]
  • HGDP Selection Web Site. A web-browser for checking for signals of selection in the human genome based on SNP data collected by Li et al (2008) in the 53 populations that constitute the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The website also includes scripts for computing iHS and XP-EHH. This work was reported by Pickrell et al (2009) and Coop et al (2009).
  • Conserved Non-Coding Elements (CNC) Data used by Kim and Pritchard (2007) PloS Genetics. Adaptive evolution of conserved non-coding elements in mammals. [PDF]
  • SNP data (2834 sites, 52 worldwide populations) used by Conrad et al (2006) Nature Genetics. A worldwide survey of haplotype variation and linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. [PDF] [Rosenberg diversity panel website]

  • Microsatellite data (377 loci, 52 worldwide populations) used by Rosenberg, Pritchard et al (2002) Science. Genetic Structure of Human Populations [PDF]

  • Y Chromosome Microsatellite Data used by Pritchard et al (1999) MBE. Population growth of human Y chromosomes: a study of Y chromosome microsatellites [PDF]

    Plots of linkage disequilibrium for several early human data sets. These are expanded versions of figures found in a review by Wall and Pritchard (2003) [August issue of Nature Reviews Genetics].


    Additional recombination rate estimates for Conrad et al. (2006) A worldwide survey of haplotype variation and linkage disequilibrium in the human genome. Nature Genetics