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Doctor of Philosophy in Environment and Resources

E-IPER's Ph.D. requirements, updated annually at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/resources.academic.php, lay out a scaffold of advising meetings, core courses, program activities, and milestones to guide students' progress. Each student works with a faculty advising team, comprising at least two faculty from different disciplines, to design a course of study that allows the student to develop and exhibit: a) familiarity with analytical tools and research approaches for interdisciplinary problem solving, and a mastery of those tools and approaches central to the student's thesis work; b) interdisciplinary breadth in each of four focal areas: culture and institutions; economics and policy analysis; engineering and technology; and natural sciences; and c) depth in at least two distinct fields of inquiry.

Program specific Ph.D. requirements are outlined in detail in the current year requirements and are summarized below:

  1. Completion of the Ph.D. core course sequence: ENVRES 310, Environmental Forum Seminar; ENVRES 315, Environmental Research Design Seminar; ENVRES 320, Designing Environmental Research; and ENVRES 330, Research Approaches for Environmental Problem Solving, taken concurrently with ENVRES 398. Directed Individual Study in Environment and Resources, each with a letter grade of 'B' or higher. E-IPER Ph.D. students are also required to take EARTHSCI 300, Earth Sciences Seminar, which is required of all incoming School of Earth Sciences graduate students.
  2. Completion of the breadth requirement in all four focal areas (culture and institutions; economics and policy analysis; engineering and technology; and natural sciences) through a sequence of courses, independent study, and/or demonstration of proficiency through prior course work or experience. Specific requirements and approved courses that satisfy breadth in each of the four focal areas as of July 2010 are listed below and in the current Ph.D. requirements document. Updated course lists are available at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.phd.curriculum.php. Fulfillment of the breadth requirement must be certified by the student's two lead faculty advisers and the E-IPER faculty director.
  3. Fulfillment of depth in the student's chosen fields of inquiry through additional courses, research, and/or independent studies. The student's two lead faculty advisers must certify that a) the two fields of inquiry are sufficiently distinct such that work integrating the two is interdisciplinary; and b) the student's course work and independent study has provided the substantial depth of understanding normally expected at the Ph.D. level.
  4. Completion of quarterly meetings with advisers during the first year, culminating in the Spring Quarter first-year big picture advising meeting; and at minimum, annual meetings thereafter, including the Spring Quarter Second Year Meeting of the Minds, prior to which students must formally identify their two lead advisers and two distinct fields of inquiry.
  5. Submission of a candidacy plan by end of Spring Quarter of the second year, for review at the Second Year Meeting of the Minds and subject to the approval of E-IPER's faculty director. The candidacy plan should document how the student has fulfilled the program requirements to date and include a summary of research ideas and a list of faculty who might serve as qualifying exam committee members.
  6. Completion of the oral qualifying exam and completion of the requirements for candidacy, including at least 25 graded graduate course units (200 level and above) with at least a 'B' average, by the end of Winter Quarter of the third year. The oral qualifying exam committee should include the student's two lead advisers and 2-3 other faculty with expertise in the student's research area. The majority of the oral qualifying exam committee should be members of the Academic Council; the chair of the committee must be an Academic Council member and may not be one of the student's two lead advisers. In exceptional cases, the committee may include a member-at-large who is not a Stanford faculty member as a fourth or fifth member.
  7. Completion of a written dissertation, approved by the student's dissertation reading committee consisting of the student's lead advisers and at least one other member, and passage of the University oral examination in defense of the dissertation following the guidelines outlined in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. The University oral examination committee comprises the student's two lead advisers, at least two additional members, and a chair who is outside of the departments of the lead advisers, all of whom are normally Academic Council members. Appointment of a non-Academic Council member must be justified and approved by the faculty director.

In addition to the requirements listed above, all Ph.D. students must:

  1. Serve as a teaching assistant for at least one quarter in a course with a discussion section or with an opportunity to lecture in at least two class sessions, in any department or program, including ENVRES 320 or ENVRES 330. Seminars, including Introductory Seminars, may not be used to fulfill this requirement. Students should fulfill the teaching requirement by the end of the third year unless they obtain a firm commitment from a faculty member to TA a future course.
  2. On an ongoing basis, submit grant proposals for external funding, defined as fellowship and/or research funds provided by a government agency, a private foundation, or a University entity other than E-IPER or the School of Earth Sciences.
  3. Participate each year in a Spring Quarter annual review in which the student and lead advisers submit progress reports to the E-IPER executive committee.

The following courses may be taken to satisfy the breadth requirement in E-IPER's four focal areas. Updated lists are available at http://e-iper.stanford.edu/academic.phd.curriculum.php. Students should consult the Stanford Bulletin's Explore Courses web site to determine the course schedule, location, eligibility, and prerequisites.

CULTURE AND INSTITUTIONS BREADTH COURSES

At least two courses are required. Students may choose a course not listed below provided it meets the criteria for this focal area's subject knowledge. Students are advised to seek approval from their lead advisers in advance and are required to obtain their advisers' signatures on the breadth certification form as verification that they have met this requirement.

ANTHRO 247. Nature, Culture, Heritage

ANTHRO 262. Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems

CEE 265D. Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries

CEE 275 A. Law and Science of California Coastal Policy

CEE 277C. Environmental Governance

EARTHSYS 112. Human Society and Global Change

EARTHSYS 224. Environmental Justice: Local, National, and International Dimensions

ECON 228. Institutions and Organizations in Historical Perspective

EDUC 332X. Theory and Practice of Environmental Education

EDUC 371X. Social Psychology and Social Change

HISTORY 376. Modern Brazil

LAW 280. Toxic Harms

LAW 281. Natural Resources Law and Policy

LAW 306. Law, Economics and Politics of International Trade

LAW 338. Land Use

LAW 437. Water Law

LAW 455. Energy Law

LAW 603. Environmental Law and Policy

LAW 604. Environmental Law Workshop

LAW 656. International Conflict: Management and Resolution

MS&E 252. Decision Analysis I

MS&E 383. Doctoral Seminar on Ethnographic Research

POLISCI 351A. Foundations of Political Economy

POLISCI 362. New Economics of Organizations

POLISCI 364. Theories of Political Institutions

POLISCI 436. Rational Choice

POLISCI 440A. Theories in Comparative Politics

POLISCI 440B. Comparative Political Economy

POLISCI 440C. Methods in Comparative Politics

POLISCI 444. Comparative Political Economy: Advanced Industrial Societies

PSYCH 223. Social Norms

PUBLPOL 102. Organizations and Public Policy

PUBLPOL 194. Technology Policy

PUBPOL 202. Organizations and Public Policy

SOC 260. Formal Organizations

SOC 314. Economic Sociology

SOC 318. Social Movement and Collective Action

SOC 320. Foundations of Social Psychology

SOC 362. Organization and Environment

SOC 363. Social and Political Processes in Organizations

SOC 363A. Seminar on Organizational Theory

SOC 363B. Seminar on Organizational Theory: Institutional Analysis

SOC 364. Social Psychology of Organizations

SOC 366. Organization Studies: Theories and Analysis

SOC 367. Perspectives on Organization and Environment

SOC 377. Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private, and Nonprofit

ECONOMICS AND POLICY ANALYSIS BREADTH COURSES

One of the course sequences listed below, culminating in ENVRES 243 (same as MS&E 243), satisfies the minimum breadth requirement. Students are advised to seek approval from their lead advisers in advance and are required to obtain their advisers' signatures on the breadth certification form as verification that they have met this requirement.

ECON 50 and 51. Economic Analysis I and II; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

ECON 50. Economic Analysis I and ECON 155. Environmental Economics and Policy; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

ECON 202 or ECON 202N and ECON 203 or ECON 203N. Core Economics; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

ECON 106. World Food Economy; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

MS&E 241. Economic Analysis; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

MS&E 248. Economics of Natural Resources; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

PUBLPOL 301A. Microeconomics; and MS&E/ENVRES 243

Possible substitutes for ENVRES 243:

ECON 250. Environmental Economics

ECON 251. Natural Resources and Energy

PUBLPOL 301B. Cost-Benefit Analysis and Evaluation

The same prerequisites listed above apply to PUBLPOL 301B, ECON 250, and ECON 251. PUBLPOL 301B focuses less on environmental issues than ENVRES 243. Ph.D. students choosing economics and policy analysis as one of their fields of inquiry are encouraged to take ECON 202 or ECON 202N and ECON 203 or ECON 203N, in addition to ENVRES 243, ECON 250, and/or ECON 251.

ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY BREADTH COURSES

At least one course is required; this list represents examples of appropriate courses only. Students may choose a course not listed below provided it meets the criteria for this focal area's subject knowledge. Students are advised to seek approval from their lead advisers in advance and are required to obtain their advisers' signatures on the breadth certification form as verification that they have met this requirement.

CEE 101B. Mechanics of Fluids

CEE 161A. Rivers, Streams, and Canals

CEE 172. Air Quality Management

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency

CEE 177. Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

CEE 201D. Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering

CEE 207A. Energy Resources

CEE 215. Goals and Methods of Sustainable Building Projects

CEE 260A. Physical Hydrogeology

CEE 262B. Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows

CEE 263A. Air Pollution Modeling

CEE 264A. Rivers, Streams, and Canals

CEE 265A. Sustainable Water Resources Development

CEE 266B. Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts

CEE 270. Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Surface Waters and Groundwater

CEE 275A. Law and Science of California Coastal Policy

EE 293A. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

EE 293B. Fundamentals of Energy Processes

MS&E 250A. Engineering Risk Analysis

NATURAL SCIENCES BREADTH COURSES

At least two courses are required. Students may choose a course not listed below provided it meets the criteria for this focal area's subject knowledge. Students are advised to seek approval from their lead advisers in advanced and are required to obtain their advisers' signatures on the breadth certification form as verification that they have met this requirement.

BIO 101. Ecology

BIO 102. Demography: Health, Development, Environment

BIO 106. Human Origins

BIO 117. Biology and Global Change

BIO 121. Biogeography

BIO 136. Evolutionary Paleobiology

BIO 139. Biology of Birds

BIO 144. Conservation Biology

BIO 175. Tropical Ecology and Conservation

BIO 216. Terrestrial Biogeochemistry

BIO 247. Controlling Climate Change in the 21st Century

BIO 264. Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions

BIO 280. Fundamentals of Sustainable Agriculture

BIOHOPK 263H. Oceanic Biology

BIOHOPK 266H. Molecular Ecology

BIOHOPK 272H. Marine Ecology

CEE 164. Introduction to Physical Oceanography

CEE 266A. Watersheds and Wetlands

CEE 272. Coastal Contaminants

CEE 274A,B. Environmental Microbiology I,II

CEE 274P. Environmental Health Microbiology

CEE 275A. Law and Science of California Coastal Policy

EARTHSYS 208. Coastal Wetlands

EARTHSYS 242. Remote Sensing of Land Use and Land Cover

EESS 143. Marine Biogeochemistry

EESS 155. Science of Soils

EESS 162. Remote Sensing of Land Use and Land Cover

EESS 164. Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS)

EESS 215. Earth Systems Dynamics

EESS 220. Physical Hydrogeology

EESS 240. Advanced Oceanography

EESS 241. Remote Sensing of the Oceans

EESS 246A. Atmosphere, Ocean and Climate Dynamics

EESS 256 Soil and Water Chemistry

EESS 258. Geomicrobiology

EESS 259. Environmental Microbial Genomics

EESS 266. Soil Chemistry

EESS 284. Climate and Agriculture

ENERGY 260. Groundwater Pollution and Oil Slicks

GEOPHYS 104. The Water Course

GEOPHYS 130. Biological Oceanography

GES 170. Environmental Geochemistry

GES 259. Marine Chemistry

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